Lubed Barrel


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Old 10-05-2007, 04:08 PM   #1
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Default Lubed Barrel

Do you think there is more force with a lubed barrel or with a dry one?

(If you were to have a small amount of lube coating your barrel)

Would the lube: A) make the bullet slide out faster and go faster
B) make the bullet not fit as perfectly and slow it down as it has to push the lube flat around the edges as it travels?



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Old 10-07-2007, 02:56 AM   #2
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In my experiences, a clean barrel is the only way to go. Granted I lube the barrel after cleaning but I remove any excess with a patch, a light coating is all that is needed. Accuracy can be effected by anything in the barrel, so take that into consideration. As far as velocity is concerned, well you'd need a chronograph to time the bullets with lube and without, so that's a project for someone with the equipment. I honestly cant see the bullet speed increasing from lube but I'm not an expert. I would be interested in the results though if anyone tries this experiment.



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Old 10-07-2007, 02:07 PM   #3
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My general understanding is that with lubrication in the barrel (wet), that pressures will increase . I do lube my barrel, to prevent rust, but before I shoot I take it out with a dry patch. I have found, when shooting at longer ranges, that the first shot will be off more, from a cold barrel with lube, than one without it. Now if you are shooting at 100m or so, I figure that it would be hard to tell.

Just my opinion. I have zero to back it up other than my experience with shooting targets at longer ranges, and trying it out. A chrono would be a good idea though..

-Bidah

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Old 10-07-2007, 07:48 PM   #4
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I go with the dry barrel too. I even run a patch through before hand (if I think of it) Oil will just collect dirt and dust and that will not help matters. A light coat after cleaning is the only time. Black powder is a different story though.

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Old 10-08-2007, 01:01 AM   #5
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all rimfire ammo as i have used in the past 45 years has some type of bullet lubricant, wax, or some simuliar substance that is supposed to prevent lead galling(leading) in the barrel. the best effect is that the bullets are assisted in their timely departure. just my .02. just gra brick and lite them up!!!

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Old 10-08-2007, 07:43 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by logistics View Post
all rimfire ammo as i have used in the past 45 years has some type of bullet lubricant, wax, or some simuliar substance that is supposed to prevent lead galling(leading) in the barrel. the best effect is that the bullets are assisted in their timely departure. just my .02. just gra brick and lite them up!!!
True about the lead jobbers,but the jacketed ones are dry. And all that gunk gums things up. Like you said, grab a brick and have fun.
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Old 10-09-2007, 03:29 PM   #7
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Default .22 Rimfire

Even the "jacketed" bullets have a lube on them. It is a dry lube that does not have as much build up. They are actually not truely jacketed but "copper washed", very thinly coated. You can actually scratch off the copper coating with your fingernail.

The first shot (cold bore) that produces the flier is generally prevented by our snipers by cleaning the barrel and firing one "fouling shot" before leaving the range. The cold bore shot is much closer to the grouping of the others shot later.

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Old 10-09-2007, 07:16 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robocop10mm View Post
Even the "jacketed" bullets have a lube on them. It is a dry lube that does not have as much build up. They are actually not truely jacketed but "copper washed", very thinly coated. You can actually scratch off the copper coating with your fingernail.

The first shot (cold bore) that produces the flier is generally prevented by our snipers by cleaning the barrel and firing one "fouling shot" before leaving the range. The cold bore shot is much closer to the grouping of the others shot later.
Thankyou robocop..I stand corrected. Do you know what 'kind' of dry lube it is? I rubbed my finger on them again and it still produces no kind of film.
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Old 10-09-2007, 07:17 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robocop10mm View Post
Even the "jacketed" bullets have a lube on them. It is a dry lube that does not have as much build up. They are actually not truely jacketed but "copper washed", very thinly coated. You can actually scratch off the copper coating with your fingernail.

The first shot (cold bore) that produces the flier is generally prevented by our snipers by cleaning the barrel and firing one "fouling shot" before leaving the range. The cold bore shot is much closer to the grouping of the others shot later.
Thankyou robocop..I guess I stand corrected. Do you know what 'kind' of dry lube it is? I rubbed my finger on them again and it still produces no kind of film.


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