Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Long Guns > Auto & Semi-Auto Discussion > AR-15 Discussion > Storing your AR with bolt open

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 07-02-2012, 06:25 PM   #21
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Quentin's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Idaho
Posts: 6,441
Liked 929 Times on 654 Posts
Likes Given: 908

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJK View Post
Do you need any more locks? I have a box full of them in the closet. Go down to Manards or Atwoods and get a locking cabinent for $200. That's no more than a days worth of ammunition. Hell you should be spending more than that a day for classes. You don't need a 500 sq ft digital, climate controlled safe.

Do you have kids?
I'm thinking of getting a locking cabinet for the basement living area. I have a 600 lb safe upstairs but don't relish the idea of getting something heavy down the stairs.

Guess I'd better look around and see what's out there, too.
__________________

______
The biggest issue with assembling an AR isn't so much getting the parts together right - it's getting the right parts together. You'll remember the quality of a gun long after you forget how much you paid for it.
________________________________________
US Army 1966-69, VFW Life Member, Retired Geek

Quentin is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-02-2012, 08:55 PM   #22
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,427
Liked 40 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 25

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jg3

Yeah, 2 girls ages 5 and 8. My monthly budget for ammo is less than $200, lol. Never heard of a "Manards" or "Atwoods". That's a good idea though...I will check Sportmans Warehouse. As far as classes go I have yet to take anything. But that's a whole different thread!!. The industry I work in took a big hit when the housing market collapsed (as I am sure many can relate to), so until that turns around, me and my family live on a very tight budget. My AR was something I had wanted to build for a VERY long time. I ended up saving for a year including selling off a few things from past hobbies to pay for the build. Unfortunately I just don't have the disposable income to invest $200-300 a month on this hobby. Thanks again for the advice guys!!
Understandable. You don't have to take a class every month. But a basic pistol and carbine will run around $70 plus 200 rounds. Well worth it.
__________________
MikeJK is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 12:46 AM   #23
jg3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
jg3's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 95
Liked 2 Times on 2 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJK

Understandable. You don't have to take a class every month. But a basic pistol and carbine will run around $70 plus 200 rounds. Well worth it.
That sounds very reasonable, I will have to look into some classes around here. Thanks again
__________________
jg3 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 02:35 AM   #24
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,427
Liked 40 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 25

Default

Not a problem. The return on taking a class is much higher than the cost.

Here's a link to a post I made about a class I took this past Sat. Armed Vehicle Operations
http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f55/one-day-armed-vehicle-class-67445/#post857093

__________________

Last edited by MikeJK; 07-03-2012 at 03:11 AM.
MikeJK is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 01:02 PM   #25
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
fsted2a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,038
Liked 201 Times on 158 Posts
Likes Given: 247

Default

Back to the original issue: I can't think of any real mechanical harm in leaving the bolt open for an extended time. I just don't think it is a good practice. I leave my bolt closed with the dustcover closed as well. If you have a shtf scenario come up, I just dont see any advantage with the bolt open. And if you need to be quiet until time to take your shot, having the bolt catch release unexpectedly before you have a chance to insert the mag can take away the element of surprise.

__________________

"Democracy is two wolves and one sheep voting on what to have for dinner.
Liberty is the well-armed lamb contesting the vote." - Benjamin Franklin

fsted2a is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 01:57 PM   #26
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
W. C. Quantrill's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Between Paradise and the Garden of Eden
Posts: 566
Liked 36 Times on 33 Posts
Likes Given: 17

Default

I read some time ago about a gun rack that was designed to store firearms barrel down. There has been a lot of discussion through the years about that, the thought being that after cleaning and oiling that, that way, if there were any excess oil it would run down the barrel and out, rather than collect in the action and get gummy.

Here, on the ranch, no small children, if I pick up a gun, the bolt will be closed, and the only thing I will need to do is flick the safety with my thumb. When I have need for a firearm, I dont have time to run all over the place finding mags or clips or whatever, and there will be no racking of an action and no warning shots. Ammo is expensive. My negotiations with trespassers is not going to go very deep into detail.

__________________

NRA Life
Whittington Center Life
Times are tough, ammo is expensive, there will be no warning shots.

W. C. Quantrill is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 02:34 PM   #27
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
fsted2a's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Posts: 1,038
Liked 201 Times on 158 Posts
Likes Given: 247

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tackleberry1 View Post
Spring fatigue used to be a concern with magazines as well. Would leaving pistol or rifle mags charged for long periods of time cause spring fatigue?

This has been debunked, today's general concensus is that springs wear out from usage, not storage, be they compressed or not so the answer to your question would be no. Storing your AR in a bolt open position should not effect the buffer springs life.

However, I would be concerned with the bolt being released and slamming closed on a foreign object, the cable lock. Personally, I'd use the lock but gently ride the bolt forward to rest on the cable and avoid it slamming forward into the cable.

Tack
I think spring fatigue may still be an issue with the military buying lowest bidder for replacement parts, not for original equipment on the rifle though. When stored in arms room, we have to put it on fire and pull the trigger.
__________________

"Democracy is two wolves and one sheep voting on what to have for dinner.
Liberty is the well-armed lamb contesting the vote." - Benjamin Franklin

fsted2a is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 09:57 PM   #28
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Tackleberry1's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Location: Vancouver,WA
Posts: 5,730
Liked 4430 Times on 2148 Posts
Likes Given: 1313

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by fsted2a View Post
I think spring fatigue may still be an issue with the military buying lowest bidder for replacement parts, not for original equipment on the rifle though. When stored in arms room, we have to put it on fire and pull the trigger.
I remember that, step up, clear, point into the barrel/trap and pull the trigger.

Pretty sure this had more to do with ensuring you were not handing the armorer a loaded weapon than with any concern about spring fatigue.

Tack
__________________
Tackleberry1 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2012, 11:59 PM   #29
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Posts: 1,427
Liked 40 Times on 39 Posts
Likes Given: 25

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tackleberry1 View Post
I remember that, step up, clear, point into the barrel/trap and pull the trigger.

Pretty sure this had more to do with ensuring you were not handing the armorer a loaded weapon than with any concern about spring fatigue.

Tack
It had to do w/ being stored in the safest way possible. The armorer checks the chamber, releases the hammer, then puts the rifle on the rack.
__________________
MikeJK is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2012, 12:06 AM   #30
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Chandler51's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: somewhere in....,Oklahoma
Posts: 2,185
Liked 62 Times on 51 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeJK

The 3 Gun and arms room example was to show it is a proven and widely excepted way to safely store a firearm.

Personal preference is great, don't get me wrong. I am a proponent of our individual rights and often speak my mind when I see them being infringed upon regardless if I agree w/ them or not.

The thing is there are reasons people do things. My first thought is speed. If you (anyone) can't get the first shot off in a defensive situation most likely you will loose that battle. I guess I would consider an armed defensive situation as a war. There probably won't be any living to fight.

An AR muzzle up, bolt open, and on safe is not fast. Think about the steps involved to get that weapon into the fight. Also remember you will more than likely be asleep. I don't know about you but the older I get the longer it takes me to wake up. Now back to thinking about the steps it takes to get your AR into the fight. First you have to grab it. I'm guessing you have a short hand guard and will grab it by the barrel until you can get your non support hand on the grip. Then you'll slide your support hand back to where you like to grab the hand guard. At this point you'll let the bolt go forward either w/ the BAD Lever or by grabbing the magwell and depressing the bolt release w/ your thumb. Now you'll have to slide your support hand back onto the hand guard. Next comes switching the selector from safe to semi. And you still don't know if a round chambered or not. Sounds like a lot of work not to be certain you'll get the bang and not a click.

Muzzle down was the standard for us and I still use it. Muzzle down is the safest way to store a firearm. A round in the dirt is harmless. A round floating around above is anything but. Remember that thing gravity?

If I need my AR I can grab it w/ my firing hand by the grip in a shooting position and bring it straight to my shoulder or even engage beforehand if need be. While bringing the stock into my shoulder my hand is firmly grasping the rail directly behind the front BUIS and more than likely the safety has already been placed into the semi position. All one fluid motion. No switching hands around or pressing anything other than the trigger if need be.

Do what you want, it's your family not mine. Do me a favor though and try it out. Not once or twice but get it down smooth. Then compare it to your current method.
I tend to keep my rifles well...WELL oiled while in the safe. Aside from all of the things you mentioned, one other reason I keep mine muzzle down is so I don't have to clean the buffer, tube, etcetera of the oil that would run down into it.
__________________
"Life's tough. It's tougher if you're stupid." -- John Wayne
Chandler51 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Ideas on how to convert a straight bolt Mauser 98k to curved bolt (sniper bolt) sharpshooter5647 General Rifle Discussion 20 11-18-2013 12:33 PM
10/22 bolt hold open jeremyx28 .22 Rifle/Rimfire Discussion 14 06-01-2012 04:49 PM
K98K Mauser loose open bolt? coltericksen The Club House 2 10-19-2011 08:52 AM
Yugo AK-47 Bolt Hold Open 30rd Mag $19.99 Cope's Distributing Sponsor Display 0 02-09-2011 01:44 PM
Firing From and Open Bolt? RL357Mag Auto & Semi-Auto Discussion 6 05-25-2008 01:53 PM



Newest Threads