Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com

Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/)
-   AR-15 Discussion (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f20/)
-   -   Rifle handguards--CHEAP (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f20/rifle-handguards-cheap-10587/)

dragunovsks 02-04-2009 07:05 PM

Rifle handguards--CHEAP
 
I just found this set of tactical handguards for the AR-15 with a 20" barrel. I got the monthly CDNN Sports catalog and found them and also found them online for $69.99. I've heard that sometimes you have to change out your barrel in order to use these types of handguards, Is there any truth to this?

AR-15 20" Quad Rail Handguard New UTG

If I buy them, will they go right on without gunsmith work or additional parts?
F.Y.I.- I have an AR-15A2, 20" barrel

hillbilly68 02-04-2009 10:59 PM

Looks like a two piece, so no real function other than looking like a free float. Would save a few extra bucks and get a YHM rifle length. Takes some work, but it is simple to swap out. And it fits the functionality bill. They run sales once in a while, can get them for around 120. And they are ROCK SOLID. Just my opinion though, its obviously up to you what ya want. Good luck

Dillinger 02-05-2009 02:54 AM

I am inclined to agree with hillbilly, and not just because he and his military friends could kick my ass. :D

If you are looking to swap out your handguard, I would go with a free float tube.

The reason is two fold:

1) Better Accuracy

2) Better Heat Dissappation

Both a benefit to the function of an AR.

Okay, a peak behind the curtain here that NO ONE who builds AR's wants you to know - don't tell anyone, okay? :p

The barrel of the standard AR has a relief lip cut into it, and a pin in place position. So when you dismantle an AR, and put one back together, you slide the barrel into the receiver up to the lip and align the pin, and you are good to go. It's quite easy.

HOWEVER - to correctly un-assemble an AR upper, it's best to have an upper receiver vise block and a handguard wrench. You don't HAVE to have them, but it's a smart idea.

Now, one of our members, infotech, ran into some SERIOUS issues trying to undo the handguard on his own upper - and it turns out that the Receiver Nut was put in bone dry, and it was cross threaded, which led to him having to ship it off and having it machined out by a gunsmith.

In addition, if your upper has a ramp front sight, the pins that go into holding it in place only go in, and come out, one way. Another member, truevil13, ran into a problem where his upper was put together, most likely by a dyslexic or a left hander, because his were in backward and he was pulling his hair out for a couple of days trying to get it off.

YHM ( Yankee Hill Machine ) makes some of the best quality, best warranteed products for AR's out there. They are a good company to deal with and their stuff ALWAYS fits like it's supposed too.

For my money - I would steer clear of a two piece clamshell style and would get a one piece that is free floated.

JD

dragunovsks 02-05-2009 03:31 AM

Thanks JD, I'm not sure if I'm going to spend the money on handguards right now, even the cheap ones, I'm just researching my options. Maybe I'll get a set after I get back to work in March.

Let me make sure I've got the whole thing straight. The handguards in question are two piece which allows a user to put them on like the standard handguards, first one and then the other (held on by the delta ring and the front sight tower).

The handguards you suggest are a single peice and require the barrel be removed from the upper in order to slide them on?

I assumed that they were all two piece, to allow easy installation. Well in the words of the mercenary guy in Under Seige 2, "Assumptions are the mother of all F-ups!"

Also, I in fact, don't have the tools that would make this change easy. However I do have roofing tools and just finished the roof of a friend who has the proper tools, we help each other out from time to time.:)

hillbilly68 02-05-2009 03:52 AM

Yes, need the proper tools for sure. But its not hard at all. Technically dont have to remove the barrel, just the barrel nut (but the bbl will just slide out after that anyway;)). The kits come with a new threaded bbl nut. All you do is remove the muzzle break, the front sight assembly and the gas tube then break the bbl nut loose and remove it. Replace the nut, torque it down (30-80 lbs) make sure the gas tube can get in aligned. Screw the new free float on and square it up and lock it in with the nut. Gas tube and sight back on, muzzle break on and you are up and running. Half hour job.
The two piece is just like regular handguards, no mod needed. But they will not be much tighter than the originals on your rifle. From what I remember seeing you have a carry handle upper so I assume you are not looking to add an optic and BUIS so it may not matter to you. But like JD said, the free float will help a good bit, 'specially with that 20in bbl of yours. For what its worth.

Jo da Plumbr 02-05-2009 04:26 AM

Is there anyone who would take a minute to help the curious new guy?
How does a free float tube give better accuracy over the standard grip? Aren't they both just a place to get a grip?
JdP

Dick Manley 02-05-2009 07:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dragunovsks (Post 68314)
I just found this set of tactical handguards for the AR-15 with a 20" barrel. I got the monthly CDNN Sports catalog and found them and also found them online for $69.99. I've heard that sometimes you have to change out your barrel in order to use these types of handguards, Is there any truth to this?

AR-15 20" Quad Rail Handguard New UTG

If I buy them, will they go right on without gunsmith work or additional parts?
F.Y.I.- I have an AR-15A2, 20" barrel

Stay away from UTG, it is just chicom airsoft ****! You would be better served by a Troy Industries MRF 12". Yes it does cost more, but it is a far superior prouduct, its made in AMERICA! To install all you need to do is cut off the the delta ring and the rail mounts on the factory barrel nut.

Here is a link for you
Troy Industries, Inc.

-DM-

Dick Manley 02-05-2009 08:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jo da Plumbr (Post 68508)
Is there anyone who would take a minute to help the curious new guy?
How does a free float tube give better accuracy over the standard two piece forearm? Aren't they both just a place to get a grip?
JdP

In theory a FF provied more accuracy because it doesn not put any pressure on the bbl. If you do not have a match rifle you really do not need one, you will not notice a difference at all. Besides most rails that claim to be FF are not true FF rails or tubes. Buy the one I provided a link for or you can also get a two piece one from Troy and you will be just as happy. Trust me I have a decent amount of Troy stuff and it is of very high quality and durability.

-DM-

slowryde45 02-05-2009 02:44 PM

Just another option...and priced right

midwest industries

slo

Dillinger 02-05-2009 03:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jo da Plumbr (Post 68508)
Is there anyone who would take a minute to help the curious new guy?
How does a free float tube give better accuracy over the standard grip? Aren't they both just a place to get a grip?
JdP

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dick Manley (Post 68547)
In theory a FF provied more accuracy because it doesn not put any pressure on the bbl. If you do not have a match rifle you really do not need one, you will not notice a difference at all. Besides most rails that claim to be FF are not true FF rails or tubes. Buy the one I provided a link for or you can also get a two piece one from Troy and you will be just as happy. Trust me I have a decent amount of Troy stuff and it is of very high quality and durability.

-DM-

Yes and No.

The actual reason the free float tube was originally proposed was to better vent the heat of the weapon in heavy, sustained fire. But, just like glass bedding an action on a bolt gun, having any less interaction with the barrel is a good thing.

The more outside influences that the barrel can be subjected to, the more it does not have the ability to react to the exact same harmonics of the previously fired round.

If you have a sling, and you wrap it tight for a couple of shots, but loosen it because you are losing blood circulation in your arm, the outside influence of the sling pulling on the front fore end will change, which will change the effects on the barrel.

If you are laying prone, and the weapon is on a sandbag or something, the stress will most likely be constant - but an AR isn't a lay prone weapon most of the time.

Dragunov has a 20" model, so he would benefit much more from a free floated fore end than your 17" model JdP, merely because his is built for "varmint" style shooting ( longer range, smaller targets ) and you are building yours for possible room clearing duties / CQB.

That said, I personally hate the plastic clamshell stock fore ends and ALWAYS change then out to YHM on my personal stuff.

We work on plenty of SWAT weapons in the shop and they all get a free float tube with rails so they can hang their lights and their forward vertical grip off the front end.

At close quarters, minute of bad guy, style of shooting - you are not needing that extra .25 inch of accuracy. At longer ranges, with outside influences like wind, mirage, smaller targets, etc - Yes, it can and does help.

Troy Industries is a great company - I don't have problems with their stuff, other than it's pretty expensive. They make a good product, but they charge accordingly.

In addition, Larue Tactical is the same way. Great stuff, heavy price tag.

The stuff from Yankee Hill Machine is just as good, cheaper ( usually ) and is also made in the US of A.

JD


All times are GMT. The time now is 01:59 PM.

Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.