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-   -   probs. with front sight. Question.. (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f20/probs-front-sight-question-21305/)

yesicarry 12-20-2009 08:08 AM

probs. with front sight. Question..
 
1 Attachment(s)
Hello,
New Bushmaster m4. Shoots nice and all but... Front sight is way too thick for me. Prefer thinner. Found these on Bushy's site..Hooded crosshair sights.

Now. With a round rear peep sight AND and round front sight, would that actually enhance the ability to "center up" correct sight picture ?

Any user reports appreciated as am thinking of giving "Wilma" a present for christmas.

hillbilly68 12-20-2009 01:44 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by yesicarry (Post 202064)
Hello,
New Bushmaster m4. Shoots nice and all but... Front sight is way too thick for me. Prefer thinner. Found these on Bushy's site..Hooded crosshair sights.

Now. With a round rear peep sight AND and round front sight, would that actually enhance the ability to "center up" correct sight picture ?.......


It wont help yopu center the sight, your eye naturally centers the front sight post in the rear sight aperture. IMO those "crosshair" sights are a straight up money transfer device. What is it you dont like about shooting with the front sight post? They are wider like you said, but for a reason. Carbines are designed to be fast... not precision rifles. Would advise against trying to solve a training issue with hardware (not meant as a condescending remark by any means). Once you get used to it, it is very accurate as it is configured. Throw an optic on it if you want to stretch it out beyond iron sight capability. Again, my opinion only.

Highpower 12-20-2009 03:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hillbilly68 (Post 202104)
IMO those "crosshair" sights are a straight up money transfer device.

Agreed. Go crazy:
KNS Sight Post Assortment AR-15 Matte Package of 7 - MidwayUSA

If all you need is a thinner front sight post, a few strokes with a fine file and some cold blue will do the trick.

FCross7 12-21-2009 12:32 AM

On post type front sights, when you sight it in, it should be sighted in so that your point of impact is directly on top the front sight post. Your sight post shouldn't ever cover your point of impact. Sighting it in so that your shooting just above your post is how guys can shoot accurately out to 2-300 yards with iron sights. Hope this helps.

-Fred

bkt 12-21-2009 10:22 AM

I understand what you're saying...the front site post top looks enormous relative to a small target 100 or more yards out. There's no substitute for practice, but I found a red-dot site did help my accuracy significantly. A new post probably isn't going to bankrupt anyone. Go for it.

yesicarry 12-22-2009 09:12 AM

Wow. Highpower found a great assortment.. Going to have to check them out.
BKT. Your right. Wont break the bank.. And besides, I might like that style of sight. Been shootin' for 40 years now and have never had a crosshair front sight. This 'ol dog might learn a new trick..:eek:

Hambone 12-30-2009 12:37 PM

If you want a quick fix.Try using the old stlye front sight from a older m16 or ar 15 the sights are round and look little smaller when sighting.

Highpower 01-03-2010 03:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bkt (Post 202565)
I understand what you're saying...the front site post top looks enormous relative to a small target 100 or more yards out.

I thin my front sight posts so that the width of the post equals the width of the aiming black on a target. In other words - when sighting on a target at 600 yards, the left and right edges of front sight post line up with the outer edges of the black "bullseye" on the target. If the front sight post isn't exactly centered under the bull, it is easily spotted vs. trying to judge how much 'overhang' you have on each side of the bull using the wider std post.

The drawbacks to this method are that the front sight is harder to acquire in quick sighting situations (CQB) and that the post is no longer 'square' but rectangular - more like a sight blade. What that means is that elevation adjustments to the front sight blade can only be made in full turn increments, in order to keep the thin part of the post aligned with the barrel. This isn't a problem for dedicated target rifle, but for a general multi-purpose rifle you are better off staying with a square post.

Another accuracy 'trick' is to lock down the front sight post. Try putting your finger on top of the front sight post of a standard AR15. Push down slightly and wiggle your finger around. Yes, the front sight post MOVES! :eek:

The movement of the spring loaded plunger and the clearance in the sight post threads will allow the front sight post to move between shots. Not a problem under most conditions, but it can cost points in a long range National Match. The common 'cure' is to remove the front sight post and then extend the thread in the front sight base all the way through and out the bottom. After reinstalling the front sight post you insert a socket head (hex) set screw from the bottom of the sight base and tighten it down against the bottom of the front sight post screw threads. The front sight post is now solid and will not move. :)

You just have to remember to loosen the set screw before trying to make elevation changes using the front sight post.....

For what it's worth.

p.s.
Round sight posts reflect more light (glare) vs. a flat surface as on the square sights posts. In either case, a sight 'smoker' is your friend when you want a nice BLACK non-reflective front sight.


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