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Old 02-14-2013, 07:07 AM   #61
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If it were really carbon fiber or some variant, it might be strong enough to give me comfort, but so many billy-jo-bob setups are out there making the stuff I am concerned some of them are just abs plastic someone found a way to produce cheap and quick by melting pvc pipe out of their mom's basement, without regard to the safety of the end user. Actual carbon fiber is stronger than steel, but is a buggar to work with, which is why it is so effing expensive.
Excellent point, fsted2a. I think there is a parallel in the tennis world. I'm old enough to have started out with wood racquets, then steel, then aluminum, then graphite. Graphite was excellent, so light but the increased racquet velocity really powered your serve and ground strokes. Unfortunately sooner or later it shattered, at first sooner. In time that was corrected but in the AR universe I'm convinced aluminum is still king. In time polymer or graphite receivers may excel but for now they're still the red-headed stepchild. To each their own, you can have it.

Even today, you pick up a 20 year-old aluminum racquet or a graphite one, which one is likely to get you though a season of big boy tennis? Rifles are lifetime investments so why not, in normal times at least, buy "the firearm" (lower receiver) made of a material that is proven to last 50+ years?
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Old 02-14-2013, 11:49 AM   #62
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Excellent point, fsted2a. I think there is a parallel in the tennis world. I'm old enough to have started out with wood racquets, then steel, then aluminum, then graphite. Graphite was excellent, so light but the increased racquet velocity really powered your serve and ground strokes. Unfortunately sooner or later it shattered, at first sooner. In time that was corrected but in the AR universe I'm convinced aluminum is still king. In time polymer or graphite receivers may excel but for now they're still the red-headed stepchild. To each their own, you can have it.

Even today, you pick up a 20 year-old aluminum racquet or a graphite one, which one is likely to get you though a season of big boy tennis? Rifles are lifetime investments so why not, in normal times at least, buy "the firearm" (lower receiver) made of a material that is proven to last 50+ years?
Not being sarcastic, but I have a serious question. What year did the Glocks hit the US? Have any of them come apart yet? The early years of poly are far behind us. Honestly, Im still waiting for one of mine to crap out. So far though my rifles are still going strong. I still have my first pc lower rifle and it has many years and thousands of rounds on it.
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Old 02-14-2013, 12:30 PM   #63
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Hey Fsted

If its a piece of crap it's only. 100 dollar mistake lord know ive made bigger . You have to be willing to try something new IMHO
Actually, I have tried what was advertised as carbon fiber, only to have it break on me trying to put a magazine in, as the mag well was too tight. I got an upper and lower, and since the lower was crap, I tossed the upper. Seen too many catastrophic failures on AR's to take a chance that one will blow up in my face.
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Old 02-14-2013, 12:36 PM   #64
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Not being sarcastic, but I have a serious question. What year did the Glocks hit the US? Have any of them come apart yet? The early years of poly are far behind us. Honestly, Im still waiting for one of mine to crap out. So far though my rifles are still going strong. I still have my first pc lower rifle and it has many years and thousands of rounds on it.
There are some brands out there that are putting quality polymer receivers out there: unfortunately we are being inundated with the cheap knockoffs that can break apart during use and you have shrapnel flying through your eyeball. If you choose anything other than aluminum for your upper or lower, choose wisely. I wouldn't recommend any that hadn't been doing it for at least 10 years.
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Old 02-14-2013, 12:42 PM   #65
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A lot has been made of the Glocks being polymer. Glock has been making quality pistols for a few decades. They have done the R&D (not just a google search) and know what will work and what won't. They have their own formula for the resin, and have spend a sizeable investment experimenting with the different suppliers of the fabric. Buying a non-metal receiver from some jackbag company that just opened their website a couple of years ago doesn't inspire confidence from me.

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Old 02-14-2013, 05:39 PM   #66
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Guys not to be a smart ass but poly will soon sweep the black rifle world just like it did the handgun world and you will be hard pressed to find a metal one. BUT, on the plus side, when major manufacturers get into the game, trusted names and brands will be available. The only polys I own are the early plumcrazy, when I bought my last one a couple of years ago they had a message on their website announcing the name change and the reasons why. NFA Is the same people with a different name because they were after law enforcement and military contracts. I have heard terrible things about the Oly Arms attempt at poly lowers but have never seen one. The PC15 however has been around for years. I could see where it would be easy to sell crap as poly so concerns are warranted, but NFA (Plumcrazy) have been here for years and have proven their quality. At least to Me.

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Old 02-14-2013, 05:53 PM   #67
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A lot has been made of the Glocks being polymer. Glock has been making quality pistols for a few decades. They have done the R&D (not just a google search) and know what will work and what won't. They have their own formula for the resin, and have spend a sizeable investment experimenting with the different suppliers of the fabric. Buying a non-metal receiver from some jackbag company that just opened their website a couple of years ago doesn't inspire confidence from me.
True enough, to a point.
1st of all, Glock hasn't been making polymer pistols for a few decades. Poly was new to everybody back then, even Glock.
2nd, Glocks then new "plastic" pistol was the first time I have ever heard of Glock and if I remember correctly wern't the early gen glocks riddled with problems? Thus the several later generations? Of all the early Glock issues I might add , none were associated with the poly. So much for Glocks high dollar R&D.
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Old 02-14-2013, 06:00 PM   #68
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Also, perhaps I am severely uneducated, but can someone please tell me what "quality" pistols has Glock made for decades before their plastic offering here in the US? I Don't doubt you just wondering .

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Old 02-14-2013, 07:49 PM   #69
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True enough, to a point.
1st of all, Glock hasn't been making polymer pistols for a few decades. Poly was new to everybody back then, even Glock.
2nd, Glocks then new "plastic" pistol was the first time I have ever heard of Glock and if I remember correctly wern't the early gen glocks riddled with problems? Thus the several later generations? Of all the early Glock issues I might add , none were associated with the poly. So much for Glocks high dollar R&D.
The Glock was introduced in the early '80s, 1982 I think, so it actually has been around for a few decades. Overall it came out of the gate reliable but as you said there have been nagging problems, even with the recent Gen4 models. Early on there were problems with some polymer frames until they got things resolved. The main thing though, the Glock from day one was designed around a polymer frame while the AR wasn't. No doubt polymer receivers will get better and good for you guys who like them. Myself, I already have four 7075 lowers so don't have an urge to grab just anything at panic pricing.

Now Glock is a different story for me, I'm a fan and have a 1992 G22 Gen2, 2004 G27 Gen3 and 2010 G23 Gen4. No problems with any of them.
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Old 02-14-2013, 07:52 PM   #70
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Also, perhaps I am severely uneducated, but can someone please tell me what "quality" pistols has Glock made for decades before their plastic offering here in the US? I Don't doubt you just wondering .
Sure, in the '70s they had a shower enclosure with a concealed Glock 1 Gen0 in a flip-top compartment next to the soap and toiletries. You could get matching towel racks too.
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