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-   -   Heavy barreled ar? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f20/heavy-barreled-ar-66461/)

Spad2137 06-15-2012 06:52 AM

Heavy barreled ar?
 
Ok guys I'm sure you've gotten a million of these and yes I have read through the forums gathering as much info as I can, but I'm going to ask anyway... With the abundance of AR configurations out there and the many manufactures I will be in the market for a heavy barreled ar soon and was hoping for some insight, I'm roughly looking to spend a 1k or less (yea I know that's pushin it) but I would like a total investment of 1200. Mainly I'm looking for an entry level, well balanced ar with reliable function, I'm quite new to the ar platform and this will be my first purchase of one. Many have said building one can be cost effective but my lack of knowledge about kinda strays me away... What are your thoughts? Definitely gunna throw some decent optics on and am just looking for a relatively affordable way to get involved with this time tested platform. .223 is definitely the caliber of choice unless a .556 is an available option... Sry for the book hahaha any suggestions and or criticism is much appreciated

Spad2137 06-15-2012 06:55 AM

Oh and the primary use will be strictly target shooting at known distances... Thanks again

Argyle_Armoring 06-15-2012 07:26 AM

There are plenty of videos and tutorials around the internet to help you biuld your own AR-15. For what you're going to use your rifle for I don't see the need for a heavy barrel (HBAR). I have tons of experience with AR's and I still buy mine in a complete rifle. After I price the parts and add up my time and effort it usually comes out the same for me. If you're going to be shooting at longer distances I might suggest an 18" or 20" barrel instead of an M4 carbine length (16").

Spad2137 06-15-2012 07:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Argyle_Armoring
There are plenty of videos and tutorials around the internet to help you biuld your own AR-15. For what you're going to use your rifle for I don't see the need for a heavy barrel (HBAR). I have tons of experience with AR's and I still buy mine in a complete rifle. After I price the parts and add up my time and effort it usually comes out the same for me. If you're going to be shooting at longer distances I might suggest an 18" or 20" barrel instead of an M4 carbine length (16").

Good thinking, I'm at the range quite a bit and mostly shoot a marlin .17hmr hb and Remington 700 .308 hb, with a few handguns thrown in, I dunno what it is about the heavy barrels but I like them a lot (helps me sleep at night lol) but anyway, it sounds like its not that big an issue, I'm quite the fan of rock river they have some nice lookin ars. As for building one I know there's this and that online and plenty of great recommendations but my biggest fear is building one, then encountering a small problem that's easily fixable and not being able to fix or adjust because of my lack of knowledge, I'd like to get one out of the box tunes from the factory ready to shoot... I'm sure I'll learn fast but it just seems everyone build forum I check out just thrown it at ya and says build away. I mean there's so much... Triggers, pins, springs, sears, tubes, uppers lowers... Where does one begin? Or is it more of a build, tweak, learn, enjoy kinda thing?

Argyle_Armoring 06-15-2012 08:17 AM

My first AR was a Rock River LAR-15. It ran flawlessly and I used it through three days of patrol rifle school, didn't clean it once, shot it in the rain and mud, and had zero problems. You can always buy a stripped lower and throw a RRA (or any other manufacturer) lower parts kit (LPK) in it. Then throw an upper on it and you're good to go.

Quentin 06-15-2012 02:29 PM

HBAR and well balanced really don't go together unless you add weight to the rear. RRA does make an accurate AR but look at BCM since you're getting in that price range.

Don't expect the run of the mill AR to be better than a good build. With the same money you can do better if you choose parts wisely. Also you can buy a complete upper receiver then build or buy the lower and learn something along the way. Even if you buy a complete rifle YOU should be in control of selecting the parts. Sadly most people are too lazy to do the research and settle for less.

Snakedriver 06-15-2012 02:50 PM

Of course one of the often heard complaints about RRA's is that they are heavy. While they DO have a lightweight profile barrelled AR-15, their standard barrel is a heavy profile. See the barrel section from their website below. The last picture is what you get with 20" barrel. Notice it's fairly thick under the handguards and narrows to 3/4" at the front sight. Made by Wilson, it is also a reason that they are so accurate. They also have some excellent stainless steel barrelled AR's for varmit and predator shooting.

http://www.rockriverarms.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_id= 272

Stainless AR Barrels:

http://www.rockriverarms.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_id= 274

The heavy complaint doesn't hold much water with me because I'm old school. Have you ever held a M14, M1 Garrand or maybe an old Mauser?

Colt used to make a pretty fine HBAR AR, as well as others, so you are not limited to RRA by any means.

AgentTikki 06-15-2012 03:00 PM

Wrote this just 4 u ....

http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/search.php?searchid=1742552



Now, production costs for producing a heavy profile barrel are actually cheaper than a lighter profile because less machining is required. Keep that in mind when shopping.

The only advantage I see in a heavy profile is benchrest target shooting for teeny tiny groups or fire supression roles. Why not try a lighter profile, it'd be much easier to shoot offhand or carry, faster handling too and better balanced.

JonM 06-15-2012 03:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AgentTikki (Post 837284)
Wrote this just 4 u ....

http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/search.php?searchid=1742552



Now, production costs for producing a heavy profile barrel are actually cheaper than a lighter profile because less machining is required. Keep that in mind when shopping.

The only advantage I see in a heavy profile is benchrest target shooting for teeny tiny groups or fire supression roles. Why not try a lighter profile, it'd be much easier to shoot offhand or carry, faster handling too and better balanced.

depends on the type of shooting. if your talking CMP service rifle type shooting weight is good as long as it is balanced well. more weight dampens the wobble of the front sight post when shooting off hand. it also helps when shooting off the bench by dampening minor movements from holding the rifle. you can get lead weight packs for the stock and handguards from rra for their national match rifles.

weight in the barrel allows you to fire a lot more shots before heat becomes an issue but also takes longer to cool. thats why a lot of varmint rifles are heavy barreled. especially amongst the prairie dogger crowd.

if the rifle is only going from the car to the bench its not a big deal but does limit what you can do with the gun.

jjfuller1 06-15-2012 03:36 PM

you said you are mainly target shooting. if you like the HBAR do it. it performs well and will give you peice of mind. now, you said you wanted an optic. will this be a scope or more of a holographic? if you already know you want a scope you will probly be better off to look for flattop uppers, or rifles. RRA is good. personally i like Stag, and PSA. i hear good things about Daniel Defense, and BCM but ive not had hands on. i would also stay with the longer barrel length as well. its not like you will need the shorter version for house clearing and CQB.

http://www.stagarms.com/index.php?cPath=13_22


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