Colt LE6940 Ammunition - Page 2
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Long Guns > Auto & Semi-Auto Discussion > AR-15 Discussion > Colt LE6940 Ammunition

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 12-09-2011, 04:37 PM   #11
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 2,393
Liked 279 Times on 220 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

Remember Google is your friend of info.

C3shooter,spot on .

__________________
hardluk1 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-10-2011, 05:51 PM   #12
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
PrimePorkchop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Urbana,Illinois
Posts: 1,748
Liked 991 Times on 499 Posts
Likes Given: 2547

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hardluk1 View Post
Remember Google is your friend of info.

C3shooter,spot on .
Five years ago, that was true.

Any more, Google is full of highest paying bidders who type in keywords that screw up searches, so that you spend half your time perusing through search results trying to sell you something.

That's why I paid to support Firearmstalk, so that I can come here and get information from people with the same interests as me.

...C3shooter gave us all some information that does not come up with a generic google search =)
__________________
PrimePorkchop is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-11-2011, 11:17 PM   #13
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 2,393
Liked 279 Times on 220 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

Well heck you can still use other search engines. Jezzz. You still get people on all these forums that will give advise haveing never touched a given firearm. And you get a small % of the firearms owners that even come to forums. You do not get even close to a well rounded view many times. Some of the worst info i have read is off forums. frompeople with closed minds. You still have to use common sence and read between the lines many times. just like with your searches.

__________________
hardluk1 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2011, 02:15 AM   #14
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
mjkeat's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Wichita,Kansas
Posts: 4,026
Liked 8 Times on 8 Posts

Default

And don't forget the guys who ignore excellent advise because they are unable to tell the good from bad or think they know best.

__________________

“The bitterness of poor quality Lingers long after The sweetness of low price is forgotten.”
-John Ruskin

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quentin View Post
"The biggest issue with assembling an AR isn't so much getting the parts together right - it's getting the right parts together."
mjkeat is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-12-2011, 03:28 AM   #15
Supporting Member
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
SSGSF's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: The best place in the world,TEXAS by God
Posts: 1,126
Liked 539 Times on 325 Posts

Default

Here this info mite be useful.

.223 Remington--Centerfire Favorite
The .223 Remington is the most widely-used centerfire rifle cartridge in the developed world. In its 5.56x45 military form, it is the primary issue ammunition for the U.S. Military and NATO forces. It is a popular sporting cartridge, and probably the most commonly used centerfire varmint cartridge. In our Readers' Poll, the .223 Rem (both standard and improved) ranked first among preferred varmint rounds. The .223 Rem is efficient and versatile. It can sling 40-grainers past 3650 fps, and deliver 90gr VLDs accurately at 1000 yards. Its parent case, the .222 Remington, was once a mainstay of benchrest competition. Today, with custom match bullets, the .223 Remington can still deliver impressive accuracy, shooting well under quarter-MOA in a good rifle.

.223 Remington Cartridge History
The .223 Rem traces its roots to the .222 Remington, a round popular with benchrest and varmint shooters in the 1950s. When the US military was looking for a new high-speed small-caliber round to replace the .308 Winchester (7.62x51), Remington started with the .222 Remington, and stretched it to increase powder capacity by about 20% in 1958 to make the .222 Remington Magnum. The cartridge was not accepted by the military, but it was introduced commercially. In 1964, the 5.56x45 mm, also based on a stretched .222 Rem case (and very similar to the .222 Rem Magnum), was adopted along with the new M-16 rifle. As with the .222 Rem Magnum, the new military case achieved enhanced velocity (over the .222 Rem) by increasing case capacity with a longer body section and shorter neck. This military modification of the .222 Rem was originally called the .222 Special but was later renamed the .223 Remington. In military metric nomenclature, the round is called the 5.56x45. For the full history of the 5.56x45 cartridge, read the 5.56x45 Timeline, by Daniel Watters.

Source for Name-Brand Factory .223 Rem Ammo: LuckyGunner.com


.223 Remington vs. 5.56x45--Chambering and Throat Considerations
Is the .223 Remington the same as the 5.56x45? The answer is yes and no. There ARE differences between the .223 Remington as shot in civilian rifles and the 5.56x45 in military use. While the external cartridge dimensions are essentially the same, the .223 Remington is built to SAAMI specs, rated to 50,000 CUP max pressure, and normally has a shorter throat. The 5.56x45 is built to NATO specs, rated to 60,000 CUP max pressure, and has a longer throat, optimized to shoot long bullets. That said, there are various .223 Remington match chambers, including the Wylde chamber, that feature longer throats. Military 5.56x45 brass often, but not always, has thicker internal construction, and slightly less capacity than commercial .223 Rem brass.

Should you be worried about shooting 5.56x45 milspec ammo in a .223 Remington? The answer really depends on your chamber. 5.56 x45 ammo is intended for chambers with longer throats. If you shoot hot 5.56x45 ammo in short-throated SAAMI-spec chambers you can encounter pressure issues. The new long-throated 'Wylde' chamber allows safe use of military ammo. Wylde chambers are quite common in Rock River guns. Other manufacturers, such as Fulton Armory, offer modified "match chambers" with extended throats that allow safe use of 5.56x45 ammo in .223 Remington rifles. For a complete discussion of the .223 Rem vs. 5.56x45 question, read this Tech Notice from Winchester, and this GunZone Commentary by Dean Speir. Without belaboring the point, we'll repeat the official SAAMI position: "Chambers for military rifles have a different throat configuration than chambers for sporting firearms which, together with the full metal jacket of the military projectile, may account for the higher pressures which result when military ammunition is fired in a sporting chamber. SAAMI recommends that a firearm be fired only with the cartridge for which it is specifically chambered by the manufacturer."


Twist Rates
The .223 Rem shoots a wide range of bullets very effectively, from 35gr flat-based varmint bullets, to ultra-long 90gr VLDs. However, you'll need the right twist rate for your choice of bullet. For max velocity and accuracy with the lightest bullets, a 1:14" twist may be ideal. More versatile is a 1:12" twist that will allow you to shoot the popular 60-64 grain match bullets. (However, a 1:9" twist is needed for the steel-core 62gr bullet used in the M855 military loads, because that bullet is as long as most 70-grainers.) For normal lead-core jacketed bullets, a 1:9" twist will let you shoot up to 73gr bullets. Since most .223 Rem shooters prefer bullets in the 50-73gr range, a good "do-it-all" solution is a 9-twist, unless you're a Highpower competitor.

For long-range match purposes, long, high-BC bullets are favored for their ability to buck the wind. You'll want at least a 1:8" twist to shoot the 77gr and 80gr MatchKings and 80gr Bergers. To shoot the new 90gr pills, a 1:6.5" is recommended, though a true 1:7" will work in most conditions.

Overall, what twist rate is best? For varminting we like a 12-twist. The slower twist will give you a bit more velocity, and minimize the risk of jacket failure at high rpms. For general use, an 8-twist barrel will let you shoot the excellent 77gr and 80gr Sierra MatchKings and nearly all varieties of non-tracer milsurp ammo. We'd only select a 1:7" or faster twist barrel if we had a need to shoot the 90gr VLDs.

Barrel Twist Rate 1:14" 1:12" 1:9" 1:8" 1:7" or 1:6.5"
Max Bullet Weight 55gr FB 65gr FB 73gr BT 80gr BT 90gr BT VLD
Acknowledgements: Big thanks to Andy ("Graymist") for his load data and many hours spent measuring brass,
to Jason for providing some cool photos, and to Sierra Bullets, for making its .223 Rem load data available.
Berger, Sierra, and Hornady also provided bullet samples.
Loading for the .223 Remington Cartridge
General Reloading Advice
There are no special tricks to reloading the .223 Remington cartridge. Use the same methods and tools you would use for other centerfire cartridges. With anything other than Lapua brass, we recommend you debur the flash hole. Sort by weight if you are loading for competition. Trim the brass to a uniform length and chamfer the case mouth inside and out. We like to use a 28-degree chamfering tool from Sinclair Int'l or Hollands for the inside chamfering, and a 45-degree Forster tool for the outside chamfering. Powder, primer, and bullet selection is discussed in separate sections below. For dies, Forster, Hornady, and Redding sizers and seaters are all good. For shooters who prefer neck-sizing, the Lee Collet Die produces very straight ammo with low run-out. To learn more about advanced case prep techniques, read Preparing Cases for Long-Range Accuracy by Jacob Gottfredson.

Reloading for AR15s and other .223 Rem Gas Guns
With their multiple bolt lugs and rapid locking/unlocking, AR15s are more sensitive to pressure and bolt thrust issues than stout, modern custom bolt actions. There is also a risk of slam-fires in AR15s. Therefore, some high-end loads that may work in a BAT, Barnard, Borden or Stiller bolt action will be too hot for an AR15. This is why Sierra issues a completely separate load map for AR15s chambered in .223 Rem and 5.56x45 (see notes above on 5.56x45 throat length concerns). We recommend the you initially reduce loads at least 0.7 grains for an AR15 compared to a bolt action, and never exceed the powder manufacturers' recommended loads. Click on the button at right to download Sierra's latest .223 Rem loads for the AR15.

With bolt-action rifles, if you shoot a moderate load, just neck-sizing the brass is a viable alternative for a few loading cycles, though eventually you'll have to run the cases through a body die or full-length sizing die. However, with an AR15, we strongly recommend you full-length size your cases every time. With proper dies, this does not over-stress the brass or lessen the useful life. For full-length sizing where you need control over neck tension, we recommend the Redding Type 'S' full-length bushing die. If you reload the same brand of brass all the time, another solution is to use a Forster full-length die with the neck honed to give your desired neck tension. Forster will hone its dies to your specification

__________________

"Don't call me Sir, I work for a living"

"I'm an A**hole"

SSGSF is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-13-2011, 01:22 PM   #16
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
PrimePorkchop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Urbana,Illinois
Posts: 1,748
Liked 991 Times on 499 Posts
Likes Given: 2547

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by hardluk1 View Post
Well heck you can still use other search engines. Jezzz. You still get people on all these forums that will give advise haveing never touched a given firearm. And you get a small % of the firearms owners that even come to forums. You do not get even close to a well rounded view many times. Some of the worst info i have read is off forums. frompeople with closed minds. You still have to use common sence and read between the lines many times. just like with your searches.
My point is there are people here who can point me in the right direction. I can use what they're telling me and, if I can verify it, I know it to be true.

If you had to find out information on something, but you didn't know what that "something" was until someone told you, how can you use a search engine to find it?

I cannot go to google and type in "is there any possible harm in firing .223 in my colt le6940" because, as you can see if you click here the results are skewed quite horridly.

And further more, I guess I don't understand the point of responding to a question in a forum titled "AR-15 Discussion" by saying "use a search engine" =)

It'd be like going to a couples retreat and walking around telling everyone there to 'get a room'




So in other words, SSGSF had an awesome, very educational post (among others who have posted here) that I can use the basis of his post and go research it myself. Now I know that I need to learn more about "twist rates" and have been given a plethora of various other bits of information that I can go verify for myself.

Just one more reason I became a supporting member. Awesome members, awesome advice.

Thanks to all who contributed =)
__________________

Last edited by PrimePorkchop; 12-13-2011 at 01:26 PM.
PrimePorkchop is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2011, 07:09 PM   #17
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 2,393
Liked 279 Times on 220 Posts
Likes Given: 31

Default

I am in NO way saying SSGSF does not supply quality info just that so many come to these forums as newbes and get feed so much info in to a confined a space . Stop and ask questions to help define what is needed answer in a more controled way and not just dump and over load them. You know question and answer not just bulk dumping of info to surf through. That is and does happen from to many all the time. Some of this is like reading multi pages of wikipedia in a condensed version.

__________________
hardluk1 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2011, 08:05 PM   #18
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FCross7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 1,017
Default

The reason people say use a search engine, or use the search function in the forum, is because we've answered this question, and a few others like it, at least 50 times.

Look on the first page of threads alone, how many threads are there asking what rifle someone should buy? I bet at least 5. It's the same with the .223/5.56 question.

That's why you get answers like that.

-Fred

__________________

"Breathe when you can, shoot when you should."
-Rob Leatham

ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ!

"Qui desiderat pacem, bellum praeparat; nemo provocare ne offendere audet quem intelliget superiorem esse pugnaturem"

FCross7 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-14-2011, 11:06 PM   #19
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
PrimePorkchop's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Urbana,Illinois
Posts: 1,748
Liked 991 Times on 499 Posts
Likes Given: 2547

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by FCross7 View Post
The reason people say use a search engine, or use the search function in the forum, is because we've answered this question, and a few others like it, at least 50 times.

Look on the first page of threads alone, how many threads are there asking what rifle someone should buy? I bet at least 5. It's the same with the .223/5.56 question.

That's why you get answers like that.

-Fred
http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=651903

There's actually zero...unless you count this one.

There's also zero results if i search ".223 or 5.56" , ".223 vs 5.56" "

So my choice is to either peruse through a few hundred pages looking for the specific one, or I could create one that is entirely unique to my question.

...regardless, its your choice to respond. If you don't want to answer it "again" then move along, there's no reason to be a smart ass about anything.
__________________
PrimePorkchop is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 12-15-2011, 02:01 AM   #20
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
FCross7's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Central Florida
Posts: 1,017
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by PrimePorkchop View Post
http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/newreply.php?do=newreply&p=651903

There's actually zero...unless you count this one.

There's also zero results if i search ".223 or 5.56" , ".223 vs 5.56" "

So my choice is to either peruse through a few hundred pages looking for the specific one, or I could create one that is entirely unique to my question.

...regardless, its your choice to respond. If you don't want to answer it "again" then move along, there's no reason to be a smart ass about anything.
Yeah, the forum search function is kind of strange, for some reason it doesn't pick up short words, but I just typed "223 vs 5.56" into Google and every link on the first page had the answer.

I'm not knocking you for asking questions. I just wanted you to know why you were getting the responses you were.

I've been on this forum since '08, and each subforum has 2 or 3 questions that get asked about a bajillion times, and people just get tired of answering the same question over and over and over, especially when the info is out there.

99% of the people on this forum, myself included, love answering questions for people, introducing them to the shooting sports, informing them on stuff they might not have known about, etc., but certain questions come up way too often.

.223 vs 5.56 isn't as bad as "which AR should I get", which has answered at least 5 times in the last month, but it has come up quite a few times.

-Fred
__________________

"Breathe when you can, shoot when you should."
-Rob Leatham

ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ!

"Qui desiderat pacem, bellum praeparat; nemo provocare ne offendere audet quem intelliget superiorem esse pugnaturem"

FCross7 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Is hollow point ammunition any noiser than any other ammunition? winds-of-change Ammunition & Reloading 30 09-08-2010 01:18 AM
Colt Address on Non-Colt Percussion Revolvers bprevolver Blackpowder & Musket 5 12-22-2009 12:55 PM
Base Prices for Colt .38 SN Detective/Colt .357 Python jknopp45 Revolver Handguns 2 02-14-2009 07:30 AM