AR15 Primer - A Beginner's Guide - Page 5
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Old 04-11-2012, 04:47 PM   #41
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I knew that was going to be the next question, what kind bullet...Honestly I don't remember, i think they were Winchester Var. i do know they were 45 grain. It is 1:7.

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Old 04-11-2012, 07:06 PM   #42
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Bullet construction has a lot to do with overal dimensions. Example, lead free hunting bullets will be larger than their weight would imply mostly because lead is denser than most other metals. But I digress, you found that that particular bullet work in your gun, that's all that matters. Can you hit a woodchuck with it at 100 yards?

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Old 04-14-2012, 05:10 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by AgentTikki View Post
Bullet construction has a lot to do with overal dimensions. Example, lead free hunting bullets will be larger than their weight would imply mostly because lead is denser than most other metals. But I digress, you found that that particular bullet work in your gun, that's all that matters. Can you hit a woodchuck with it at 100 yards?




this brings me to another question for you Agent. with all this GREAT INFO from you, and as a noobie to the AR fan base. i really like the style and feel of the ar for range/homedefence use, but wanting to consolidate my ammo am interested in the 9mm AR-15 and thinking of 18" barrel is this a good idea. Sooooo many say its not. but they have as much knolegde on this as i do (family@friends) so i am ignoring them for a more informed opion. i am not looking to go down range no 300yds or more, just 50 to 150yds. is it not true that most conflicks are in that range any, and with the 9mm i can aford enough ammo for both my pistol and rifle. any thoughts would help.
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Old 04-16-2012, 03:48 PM   #44
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Honestly I'd have to defer to experts on this. While the appeal of a handgun based round in a carbine isn't lost on me, I'd mainly be concerned with feeding and cycling reliability. Mags are also harder to find and more expensive. If ammo price is an issue, russian fmj and hollow point ammo can be found for less than 20 cents a round (cheaper than new 9mm).

Using this resource
http://www.ballisticsbytheinch.com/9luger.html

You can see muzzle velocities start to fluctuate at longer barrel lengths, and that with most loads there isn't much gain beyond 14". Ballistically it doesn't like you'd gain much by going 18". This is probably due to the fast burn rates of handgun powders.

As a first time buyer, I still highly recommend you get a 5.56 based AR first. You can convert it to 9mm by just replacing the upper and mags, and sell the 5.56 upper with minimal loss on your investment. Ballistically 5.56 is a vastly superior round. It has approximately 1200 ft/lb, 9mm has approximately 400. Give 5.56 a try. If you don't like it, then convert it. I like 5.56x45 so much, I have a 5.56 pistol, mebbe you should convert your whole stash from 9mm to 5.56?

As for 150 yard engagements, with a 16" barrel and 55 gr fmj like m193, the 5.56 is devastating due fragmentation. This coupled with the fact that you can take this same setup and hit targets at 400 yard readily, will change the way you think about handguns. Being a city boy, I started shooting handguns due to the fact that most local ranges only allow handguns. After shooting carbines, I realized how amazing and how much more capable a carbine is. Go shoot the AR, it'll change the way you think.

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Old 04-17-2012, 05:27 AM   #45
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It changed my whole opinion the day I first put a 5.56 AR in my hands. Know I'm

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Old 04-17-2012, 05:31 AM   #46
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Rented one from my range. Now I'm infatuated with em. Tiki won't steer you wrong

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Old 04-17-2012, 07:31 PM   #47
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I agree with Tikki, 9mm in an 18" AR is inferior to plain jane .223/5.56 and won't save you much to shoot. You'll be glad you went with a standard AR. Leave the 9mm for a second AR but honestly there are other rifle calibers more interesting.

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Old 04-17-2012, 10:17 PM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by winkshotar15 View Post
but wanting to consolidate my ammo am interested in the 9mm AR-15 and thinking of 18" barrel is this a good idea. Sooooo many say its not. but they have as much knolegde on this as i do (family@friends) so i am ignoring them for a more informed opion
Have you ever seen a 9mm with an 18" barrel? There's probably a reason for that. Pistol calibers don't benefit from the longer barrel of a rifle. If you are set on sticking to one caliber, 9mm, why not look at some 9mm carbines - http://www.rockriverarms.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=category.display&category_id= 237 or http://www.berettausa.com/products/cx4-storm/
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Old 06-13-2012, 07:38 PM   #49
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Ran across a great little article that further explains what FNC is. The author is knowledgeable and trustworthy.

Either works just fine and serves to protect the chamber and bore from chemical, thermal and mechanical attack. Both will be easier to clean than a plain untreated/unplated barrel surface. However, all things being equal the nitrocarburized barrel will be slightly more accurate mechanically unless precise and costly post-processing steps are taken on the chrome-lined barrel to re-establish bore dimensions that the deposition of chrome lining will slightly alter with variations throughout the bore and chamber.

The most common nitrocarburizing process used on barrels right now is molten salt-bath nitrocarburizing under the tradenames Isonite and Melonite, with the process types usually QPQ (for chrome-moly steel) or QP (for stainless steel). Q is for Quench, the actual process of submerging the barrel in molten nitrogen and carbon bearing salts and P which is for Polish, the mechanical polishing of bore and chamber surfaces after the first Quench operation. The outside of the barrel is treated during this process (more or less impossible to avoid) and leaves a lamp black, very hard surface that can be either left as is, media blasted prior to treatment to knock some of the shine off that can be present after processing (semi-gloss black) or blasted off and parkerized, blued, or painted.

Nitrocarburizing isn't new - it's at least 75 years old. European barrel makers started using it in the late 1960s after looking for a way to replace the costly and often finicky chrome plating process. It was already being used in marine, engine manufacturing and hydraulic applications. Now, most of the big European makers use a nitrocarburizing process instead of chrome plating. The IMI Galil in .308 I owned back in the late 80s had a nitrided barrel, something that I knew little about at the time and falsely assumed was just a cost cutting measure.

This process is only "new" to US barrel makers, not new to the world. Hydraulic equipment and engine parts have in many cases had nitrocarburized surfaces for 40+ years as an alternative to hard chrome, an application more common here than gun barrels. Unlike chrome lining, you don't have to buy your barrel already nitrided. You can have an existing barrel that has proven to be a good shooter preserved by nitrocarburizing it, or buy a less costly plain barrel and have it nitrocarburized. Contact Roccobro for details, we have a group buy opportunity to get whatever barrel you wanted treated and returned in a few weeks for a reasonable price.


Source
http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/showthread.php?t=583394

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Old 06-13-2012, 09:04 PM   #50
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Good info, AT!

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