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-   -   AR-15 brand new, how to? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f20/ar-15-brand-new-how-50060/)

xdm11chad 10-18-2011 05:17 AM

AR-15 brand new, how to?
 
Just picked up my brand new ar it's a spikes tactical I'm in love now I need canebrake to make me a list like he did with my new 1911 do's and dont's how to clean what to use and when to clean for the first time!
Thank you everyone for your support I'm new to guns but you guys have made my welcome well worth this awesome hobby and passion of mine!

mjkeat 10-18-2011 02:35 PM

A list?

Run a bore snake through it and get at it. You're shooting an AR. :)

Bushman 10-18-2011 03:01 PM

Here's some pics on AR15 Lube points.
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...uns/lube11.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...uns/lube21.jpg
http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v2...uns/lube31.jpg

canebrake 10-18-2011 03:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mjkeat (Post 604258)
A list?

Run a bore snake through it and get at it. You're shooting an AR. :)

+1

I'm with mjkeat, it's new. Make sure the bore is free of any manufacturing crap or shipping protection and get 'er dirty!

Bushman provided a great visual to assist you in lubing your AR.

Remember this is NOT a brake-in, its a new gun test to find any issues that will require the gun to be returned to the manufacture for repair.

Don't change anything on the gun until this NGT (new gun test) is complete and you have found it free of any issues. Shoot ~500 rounds to satisfy the weapon's reliability.

mjkeat 10-18-2011 05:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by canebrake (Post 604283)
+1

I'm with mjkeat, it's new. Make sure the bore is free of any manufacturing crap or shipping protection and get 'er dirty!

Bushman provided a great visual to assist you in lubing your AR.

Remember this is NOT a brake-in, its a new gun test to find any issues that will require the gun to be returned to the manufacture for repair.

Don't change anything on the gun until this NGT (new gun test) is complete and you have found it free of any issues. Shoot ~500 rounds to satisfy the weapon's reliability.

good advice

Quentin 10-18-2011 05:34 PM

Yes, good advice above.

Take a look at what happens in real life!

http://i829.photobucket.com/albums/z...dscleaning.jpg

NickySantoro 10-18-2011 06:22 PM

OP,
D/L TM 9-1005-249-10 at BiggerHammer - When a small hammer just ain't enough - New Server
Pretty much all you need to know.

neilage66 10-18-2011 06:34 PM

I'm a contrarian to our beloved Canebrake. :p

If I have a weapon that's new and fresh from the manufacturer, I don't trust that the barrel, chamber and internals are free of sticky metal preservative, burrs and chunks of steel or aluminum left over from the manufacturing or packaging process.

More than once, I have found these conditions which would likely have led to malfunctions on the first range trip, despite the fact that the weapon was good to go otherwise.

Not only does a detail strip, clean and lube prevent possible malfunctions out of the box, it also familiarizes me with the detailed workings and function of the various parts. This knowledge can often be the key to quickly solving a stoppage in the field.

Once I'm sure everything is assembled properly...clean and lubed and looks copacetic...it's time for test firing and sighting in at the range.

If function is good for several hundreds of rounds, then it is time to clean again and very closely inspect for wear (if any is visible) on metal to metal contact areas to make sure everything is mating together smoothly.

If everything checks out...chances are it's gonna last 100 years with proper maintenance.

I have noticed the tendency to *send it back to the manufacturer* on the forums and I often think shooters make a snap judgement too quickly. A little finesse and research can often solve problems without involving the manufacturer. I like to solve problems on my own...that's how I learn my weapon.

My 2/100ths of 1 dollar.

xdm11chad 10-18-2011 09:56 PM

I never buy from manufactures! Just saying

Quentin 10-18-2011 11:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by neilage66 (Post 604428)
I'm a contrarian to our beloved Canebrake. :p
...

I didn't see a whole lot of differences in what you guys said, both of you are pretty smart! :p


Quote:

Originally Posted by neilage66 (Post 604428)
...I have noticed the tendency to *send it back to the manufacturer* on the forums and I often think shooters make a snap judgement too quickly. A little finesse and research can often solve problems without involving the manufacturer. I like to solve problems on my own...that's how I learn my weapon.

My 2/100ths of 1 dollar.

I definitely agree here. Most things from coffee makers to ARs that are returned are due to owner error or confusion. No doubt better manuals could save manufacturers a lot of returns and CS calls. Even so, once you give things time to sink in you usually find out nothing is wrong.


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