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Old 04-20-2013, 04:30 PM   #11
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OK, so I consider the upper to include the barrel, if thats how it was bought. I was under the impression that with 223 VS 5.56, bullet weight had nothing to do with anything. More like a higher pressure thing.



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Old 04-20-2013, 06:07 PM   #12
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If you check your reloading manuals, you will notice

powder charges between .223 and 5.56 are minimally different,

but the bullet

weights of 5.56 are considerably heavier. Gives me the impression

pressure at the chamber and bolt would be higher.



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Old 04-20-2013, 09:30 PM   #13
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Wolf,
It is entirely possible unless the entire gun was new in the box that the barrel was a replacement.

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Old 04-21-2013, 12:13 AM   #14
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The last time I checked there were 9 different chamberings of .223. With so many different chamber dimensions some of the manufacturers mark their lowers with 223 to limit their liability in the event that some one puts over pressured ammo in them. The lower receiver and upper receiver are not subjected to chamber pressure. The bolt locks into the barrel extension and all the pressure is contained by it. For this reason you should follow the markings on the barrel since the barrel extension is fitted to it before it is put on an upper. In my experience ar bolts are very strong and I can't ever recall hearing of one that wasn't designed to handle NATO spec pressures. You don't really hear of bolt problems until someone starts taking metal off of them deliberately (6.5 Grendel), or they get very old. Typically you will experience cases sticking in the rifle or primers being punctured if your ammo is creating too much pressure. Given the number of chamberings you should check your cases every time you try a new brand. Look at the back of the fired case, if the primer looks cratered or you can feel a ridge on it when you run your finger nail across it then stop and don't shoot that ammo in that rifle any longer. The statement that NATO ammo is wider is false . NATO cases have the same external dimensions as commercial cases. The side walls are often thicker but that affects the internal dimensions. The ogive however is a different story. The bullets in 5.56 ammo are usually longer than their civilian counterparts which causes them to be closer to the lands as the cartridge sits in the chamber this results in less bullet jump and higher chamber pressures. NATO spec chambers are cut with generous throats to account for this and reduce throat erosion. The chambers are cut wider, but that is to increase reliability in combat conditions not to accommodate a wider cartridge.

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Old 04-21-2013, 03:54 PM   #15
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^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
I reload, so I will definitely be reboxing, saving, and repeatedly

inspecting all fired casings. If you re-box at the range it saves you

headaches later. And, uh, my friend saves money if I reload, too.

Yeah...

Thank you all for your assistance. Now we know enough to operate

the firearm safely.

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Old 04-21-2013, 10:51 PM   #16
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So after a few hours of careful research, using the

scant markings on the upper, turns out the bolt,

carrier, upper, and barrel are all Colt.

The rifling and chamber are pristine. We're

looking forward to some range time with this

unit.

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Old 04-22-2013, 02:06 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by therewolf View Post
I have a friend, yeah, that's the ticket, who

recently acquired a Colt Match Grade HBAR AR15

in 223 caliber(marked on the lower). The bull barrel is clearly stamped

"5.56 NATO-1/7-HBAR".

(Looks exactly like a Vietnam-era M-16)

What I, er, HE was wondering is,

is it safe to fire 5.56 ammo through this rifle, without risking

damage to the bolt, chamber, upper, and springs, and latches

if it

and pins and washers and woodruff keys and stuff?

I must apologize for my friend, because he knows less about

ARs than Owe-bozo knows about ethics in government. TIA
if it (Looks exactly like a Vietnam-era M-16).........it aint a match grade
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Old 04-22-2013, 06:50 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by highpowerguy View Post
The last time I checked there were 9 different chamberings of .223. With so many different chamber dimensions some of the manufacturers mark their lowers with 223 to limit their liability in the event that some one puts over pressured ammo in them. The lower receiver and upper receiver are not subjected to chamber pressure. The bolt locks into the barrel extension and all the pressure is contained by it. For this reason you should follow the markings on the barrel since the barrel extension is fitted to it before it is put on an upper. In my experience ar bolts are very strong and I can't ever recall hearing of one that wasn't designed to handle NATO spec pressures. You don't really hear of bolt problems until someone starts taking metal off of them deliberately (6.5 Grendel), or they get very old. Typically you will experience cases sticking in the rifle or primers being punctured if your ammo is creating too much pressure. Given the number of chamberings you should check your cases every time you try a new brand. Look at the back of the fired case, if the primer looks cratered or you can feel a ridge on it when you run your finger nail across it then stop and don't shoot that ammo in that rifle any longer. The statement that NATO ammo is wider is false . NATO cases have the same external dimensions as commercial cases. The side walls are often thicker but that affects the internal dimensions. The ogive however is a different story. The bullets in 5.56 ammo are usually longer than their civilian counterparts which causes them to be closer to the lands as the cartridge sits in the chamber this results in less bullet jump and higher chamber pressures. NATO spec chambers are cut with generous throats to account for this and reduce throat erosion. The chambers are cut wider, but that is to increase reliability in combat conditions not to accommodate a wider cartridge.
Without the background engineering knowledge to agree or disagree with you, the OP's question centered around could he fire ammo labeled 5.56 if the reciever was marked .223, but the barrel was marked 5.56. I still stand by my assertion that it is the barrel he should be concerned with, not the receiver. If he had Lake City 5.56 Ammo, and the Colt barrel was marked .223, I would be concerned, as he probably did have a vietnam era rifle. I've had issues in the past with M16's that were Vietnam era jamming on 5.56 rounds at the qualification range. We ended up changing out the barrels to solve the problem.
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Old 04-22-2013, 07:40 PM   #19
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I agree with that assertion the only reason I made the comments about the case diameter being the same is because saying otherwise would lead one to believe that 5.56 ammo shouldn't chamber in a .223 which would be quite false, they chamber just fine which is why there is a problem. I felt it was noteworthy to make the correlation between sticking cases and chamber over pressure. I was not trying to offend, having that information makes a person less likely to injure themselves or damage their equipment.

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Old 04-22-2013, 08:31 PM   #20
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Www.ar15barrels.com/data/223-556.pdf

Some may find this interesting


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