.223 fired out of a 5.56 NATO AR-15 - Page 4


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Old 07-01-2012, 03:50 AM   #31
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Originally Posted by dabbson View Post
Hi everyone i picked up my first AR which is a S&W M&P 15 sport chambered in 5.56 NATO,
Just curious to know how you like the rifle? I was considering getting one myself, would you recomend it?


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Old 07-01-2012, 05:48 AM   #32
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So I can't reload 5.56 ?? Should the .223 be slightly smaller then the 5.56 ?
5.56 and 223 are identical as far as case dimensions, the only difference in "Factory" 5.56 and 223 is the operating pressure or the amount of powder if you will. More powder in the 5.56 case = more pressure.

Again, 5.56 and 223 share the exact same external case dimensions, the 223 is not smaller, they are the same. The chambers are slightly different as the 5.56 has a longer throat to accommodate the higher pressure 62K psi round and the chamber may or may not be slightly larger. The increased size of the chamber has little to do with ammo and pressure, it is all about reliability in a battle field situation. The larger chamber 5.56 will keep running when the 223 chamber is down and out and needs to be cleaned.


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Old 07-11-2012, 03:47 PM   #33
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Just curious to know how you like the rifle? I was considering getting one myself, would you recomend it?
I highly recommend it . I have had no problems so far. I love it
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Old 07-11-2012, 04:05 PM   #34
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Originally Posted by EW1066
Shooting 223 in a 556 rifle will yield lower than normal chamber pressures and is safe. 556 in a 223 chamber will yield chamber pressures as great as 20k psi higher than normal. NOT SAFE

OP, you are safe. Just understand there will likely be a shift in zero should you start to shoot 556.

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I agree here. Enjoy it it's a great rifle.
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Old 07-11-2012, 05:09 PM   #35
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I have the same gun. When I go to the range I use .223.like everyone said you can use .223 in a 5.56 but you can not use 5.56 in a .223. To skip all the explaining just know 5.56 is a hoter round and a .223 can not handle it. It's the same as .38 and .357 mag.

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Old 07-11-2012, 05:50 PM   #36
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To skip all the explaining just know 5.56 is a hoter round and a .223 can not handle it. It's the same as .38 and .357 mag.
No, it is NOT the same thing as a .38 Special and a .357 Magnum. A .357 Magnum has a .100 longer case than a .38 Special. You physically cannot chamber a .357 round in a .38 Special revolver because the round is too long. It was designed that way.

A .223 case is identical in exterior dimensions to a 5.56 MM case. The only difference is the 5.56 MM case may have thicker case walls at or near the rim. This however is not always the case. Sometimes these internal dimensions vary according to the brass manufacturer.

Another thing is that there are .223 loads listed in many of the older reloading manuals from the early 70's, that have higher pressures than many of the 5.56 MM Service Rifle loads currently listed in some of the newer, more modern manuals. In this regard all of this, "don't shoot 5.56 MM in a .223" goes right out the window. The only difference in these 2 rounds externally is the freebore in the barrel itself. That is not enough to run chamber pressures higher than some of the early .223 loads I mentioned above, that are listed in the older manuals.

I've run these hotter .223 loads in both .223 and 5.56 MM chambers, in BOTH .223 and 5.56 MM cases, with no ill effects what so ever. I'm talking tens of thousands of rounds over a period of decades in well over a dozen different rifles. That in itself is why I really wish these "Don't shoot 5.56 MM in a .223 rifle!" threads would simply just go away. In over 40 years of shooting, I have never seen any .223 chambered rifle that was adversely effected by it, EVER. I no longer even bother to segregate my 5.56 MM and .223 brass anymore. Unless I'm loading match ammunition for guilt edged accuracy. There is no need to do so.
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:33 PM   #37
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Originally Posted by billt

No, it is NOT the same thing as a .38 Special and a .357 Magnum. A .357 Magnum has a .100 longer case than a .38 Special. You physically cannot chamber a .357 round in a .38 Special revolver because the round is too long. It was designed that way.

A .223 case is identical in exterior dimensions to a 5.56 MM case. The only difference is the 5.56 MM case may have thicker case walls at or near the rim. This however is not always the case. Sometimes these internal dimensions vary according to the brass manufacturer.

Another thing is that there are .223 loads listed in many of the older reloading manuals from the early 70's, that have higher pressures than many of the 5.56 MM Service Rifle loads currently listed in some of the newer, more modern manuals. In this regard all of this, "don't shoot 5.56 MM in a .223" goes right out the window. The only difference in these 2 rounds externally is the freebore in the barrel itself. That is not enough to run chamber pressures higher than some of the early .223 loads I mentioned above, that are listed in the older manuals.

I've run these hotter .223 loads in both .223 and 5.56 MM chambers, in BOTH .223 and 5.56 MM cases, with no ill effects what so ever. I'm talking tens of thousands of rounds over a period of decades in well over a dozen different rifles. That in itself is why I really wish these "Don't shoot 5.56 MM in a .223 rifle!" threads would simply just go away. In over 40 years of shooting, I have never seen any .223 chambered rifle that was adversely effected by it, EVER. I no longer even bother to segregate my 5.56 MM and .223 brass anymore. Unless I'm loading match ammunition for guilt edged accuracy. There is no need to do so.
WOW! You sure saved me a buncha typing!!!
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Old 07-11-2012, 09:46 PM   #38
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Shoot the damn thing. 5.56 .223 whatever. Just remember that if you have a gun marked .223 only use that.

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Old 07-11-2012, 10:26 PM   #39
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Kinda amazing- 4 pages & the OP's question could have been answered with a yes

Ya'll think too many try to answer a simple question with too much added complication? Especialy when you starting getting answers like-

Quote:
It's the same as .38 and .357 mag.
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Old 07-12-2012, 01:22 PM   #40
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Originally Posted by billt View Post
No, it is NOT the same thing as a .38 Special and a .357 Magnum. A .357 Magnum has a .100 longer case than a .38 Special. You physically cannot chamber a .357 round in a .38 Special revolver because the round is too long. It was designed that way.

A .223 case is identical in exterior dimensions to a 5.56 MM case. The only difference is the 5.56 MM case may have thicker case walls at or near the rim. This however is not always the case. Sometimes these internal dimensions vary according to the brass manufacturer.

Another thing is that there are .223 loads listed in many of the older reloading manuals from the early 70's, that have higher pressures than many of the 5.56 MM Service Rifle loads currently listed in some of the newer, more modern manuals. In this regard all of this, "don't shoot 5.56 MM in a .223" goes right out the window. The only difference in these 2 rounds externally is the freebore in the barrel itself. That is not enough to run chamber pressures higher than some of the early .223 loads I mentioned above, that are listed in the older manuals.

I've run these hotter .223 loads in both .223 and 5.56 MM chambers, in BOTH .223 and 5.56 MM cases, with no ill effects what so ever. I'm talking tens of thousands of rounds over a period of decades in well over a dozen different rifles. That in itself is why I really wish these "Don't shoot 5.56 MM in a .223 rifle!" threads would simply just go away. In over 40 years of shooting, I have never seen any .223 chambered rifle that was adversely effected by it, EVER. I no longer even bother to segregate my 5.56 MM and .223 brass anymore. Unless I'm loading match ammunition for guilt edged accuracy. There is no need to do so.

Thanks Bill, you hit the nail on the head.
Here is a pressure test done by Barnes, Note nothing dangerous here.



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