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Why do Idiot's buy 338 Lapua Magnums?


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Old 03-21-2014, 03:23 AM   #101
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Originally Posted by snyder77 View Post
Finally someone that knows what they are talking about, bullets are the most stable they will ever get as they leave the barrel. Those that say the bullets stabilize "down range" please don't state things like this, if you have info to back it up i'm all ears, but I don't want a new inexperienced member to read this and accept it as real info. We are our worst enemies if we allow misinformation to occupy our forums.
I was going to comment but I couldn't think of a polite way to word it. Plus I didn't want to get freight trained by a bunch of fools.
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Old 03-21-2014, 03:26 AM   #102
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I was going to comment but I couldn't think of a polite way to word it. Plus I didn't want to get freight trained by a bunch of fools.
stay off the train JD and you'll be just fine!
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Old 03-27-2014, 05:58 PM   #103
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Originally Posted by tonydewar View Post
a bullet comes out flat and starts to drop as energy is blead off it only rises if the barrel is inclined upward and the sights are set for a poi in the distance. ie my .22 will hit close to the same poi @25 and 100 yds
That is not quite true if I remember my Newtonian Physics correctly. With the barrel pointed upward the bullet will start to drop from that angle the instant the bullet leaves the barrel and follow a parabolic path and will be above the horizontal until it drops to the zero point range. You are right in that the bullet will cross the horizontal at close to 25 yards because the scope is able the barrel. At that point is still moving upward but is below the angle it original started out at. Then will drop and cross the horizontal at 100 yard if that is how you rifle is zeroed. You have two force simultaneously acting on the bullet. The gravitational force and the force imparted by the powder. Since the gravitational force is always acting towards the Earth's center it will start causing the bullet to drop from its original upward path instantaneously. Maybe this will help explain the trajectory.
Bullet Trajectory: Fact and Myth

By Mike Nelson


Myths and errors regarding the path of a bullet generally come from a lack of understanding of the forces acting on the bullet before, during, and after its path through the barrel. This article will deal with the primary forces on a bullet's trajectory, and it will mention a few of the secondary forces. The approach is directed toward the average reader. There is no attempt to address concerns of the mathematician or physicist, who should either know this material or should read a more technical and comprehensive treatise.

One of the more pervasive myths associated with bullet trajectory is that "bullets always rise right after they leave the barrel." In general, bullets do rise after leaving the barrel, and they immediately begin to drop. This is not a contradiction, and the explanation is not difficult to understand.

Bullets are affected by gravity whether in flight or not, and, when they leave the barrel, they no longer have any physical support, such as the brass, the box, your pocket, the magazine, the chamber, or the barrel, so they begin to fall. In addition, they are traveling through air, so air resistance progressively slows their flight. On most occasions the barrel is slanted upward slightly to compensate for this immediate drop; thus, for all but extreme shots, since the barrel is aimed slightly upward, the bullet does, indeed, rise slightly after it leaves the barrel, but it bullet never rises above the axis of the barrel. (Just like a football generally rises above the player when they throw a pass. The longer the pass, the greater the starting angle, and the higher the "rise" before the ball begins to fall.)

In scientific terms, "thrown" objects, whether by hand, explosion, springs, compressed air, or other forces, are called "projectiles," their path in space is called their "trajectory," and the study of their trajectories is called "ballistics." Those who fail to understand the elementary physics of ballistics often misinterpret the configuration of barrel and the line of sight and assume that something "special" happens to the bullet during its flight. Many things happen, but nothing "special;" bullets fly just like any other projectile and are subject to the same laws of physics.

The following drawings, though not to exact scale, show the typical paths of bullets and the relationship of these paths to the line of sight, whether determined by open sights or optical sights.

Horizontal Shot. If the barrel is horizontal to the surface of the earth when fired, the bullet never rises above the barrel, and gravity causes an immediate descent.


Typical Alignment. Generally, for what we consider a "horizontal" shot, the sight alignment places the barrel in a slightly upward tilt, and the bullet starts its arc, rises slightly above the level of the muzzle, but never above the axis of the barrel, reaches a peak, then descends. Figure 2 is the graph of a centerfire rifle cartridge that stays within a 6 inch circle for a distance of about 210 yards. Sighted in at approximately 170 yards, this round is approximately 3 inches high at 100 yards and three inches low at approximately 210 yards. You must, of course, always check trajectory data for your particular rifle and cartridge combination.


Velocity. The velocity is a factor in determining energy on impact and the horizontal velocity determines how far the bullet travels before it hits the ground. The above illustrations apply to all ballistic projectiles whether bullets, rocks, or ping pong balls.

Low Velocity Bullets. Bullets at nominally 800 fps to perhaps 1600 fps, such as 22 LR, most pistols, and older rifle cartridges, must follow a rather high arc in order to reach a target 100 yards away. In fact, most of these slower cartridges are only useful to about 50 yards, perhaps 75 yards for some in the upper end of this range.

High Velocity Bullets. Bullets at 2600 fps and up, such as the .223, 22-250, .243/6mm, .270, .308, 30-06, follow a much lower arc to reach a target, and their useful range can be upward of 200 yards. These are often referred to as "flatter" trajectories. With higher velocities, these bullets go much further before gravity and air resistance cause them to fall below the initial line of sight.

Since the barrel is generally directed at an angle to the line of sight, sighting directly upward or directly downward results in a trajectory that deviates even more from the line of sight than the typical, relatively level shot. Still, the effects of gravity and air resistance are the same as far as the bullet is concerned, it is just that the trajectory at such a steep angle is more divergent from the line of sight.

Secondary Ballistics Phenomena. In general, bullets follow a parabolic arc. In reality, that arc is modified significantly by air resistance, which slows the bullet during flight and effects a shortening of the arc down range. That is why the highest point of the usable portion of the trajectory is not the midpoint of that trajectory. Bullet shape and the spin from rifling also influence the trajectory slightly by reducing air resistance and stabilizing bullet orientation. That is why a 500 grain rifle bullet, for example, has a much better trajectory than a 500 grain ball from a smooth bore, all other things being equal.

Fact or Myth. So, does a bullet rise after it leaves the muzzle? One says, "yes." Another says, "no." Who is correct? Both could be correct because of different meanings associated with the word, "rise." They might argue incessantly, but their argument will not change the physical aspects of the path of the bullet. If they would concentrate on discussing the physical events, they would eventually conclude that they were each using the word, "rise," differently or that one of them did not understand elementary ballistics.

Thought Question. When sighted in for a typical hunting or target situation, what is the path of the bullet in relation to the sight picture if the rifle is aimed directly up or down?

Last edited by samnev; 03-27-2014 at 06:09 PM.
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Old 03-28-2014, 02:07 AM   #104
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Originally Posted by chloeshooter View Post
I've noticed as a RSO at the local gun club that very often, the guys with the neatest, newest and most expensive equipment are oftentimes the guys that are the newest and have the least amount of actual skill.

I spent a couple of hours shooting at the 200 meter range a few years ago with a guy with .338 Lap out of what he claimed was a $4000 rig. Funny the guy could not find paper while I was shooting 2 1/2 inch groups with factory corelockt in 30-06, secondhand Remington 700 and older Nikon Buckmaster scope. This was pre-trigger replacement pre stock replacement so we are talking about a $400 'rig' at that time. Not shooting competition good but I'd call that good shooting for what I expect
do this all the time love the clowns with there camo and bloused pant legs the .22lr at 100 yds can produce tighter groups than most of the SNIPER rounds just need to do it correctly
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Old 03-28-2014, 02:09 AM   #105
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moa is moa!!!
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Old 01-22-2015, 01:38 PM   #106
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Default 30-06 blues

My first rifle was a used Remington 760 GameMaster pump 5-shot .30-06. Limited cash flow made the $75 rifle my choice (we're talking 1971) PLUS (BIG plus) a friend who went all .308 had handed me 180 rounds of .30-06 ammo in various bullet weights.

First day out I went out for a rabbit (stop giggling!) and took the Remington just to use it--no shells for the 16ga made it an easy decision. Took the rabbit's head clean off, but left me plenty of a meal without needing to poke out lead shot.

Same rifle, with my forearm resting on a bale of hay, took out a skunk at just over 300 yds using the iron sights--I aimed 14-15 inches high due to trajectory at that distance, and 9-10" into the wind. The bullet bounced off the dirt 3" right in front of the skunk and gutted it, dropped in place. It was SO far away that I'd thought it was a woodchuck, and wanted him OUT of my horse pasture fast. Took the shot and only noticed that it was a skunk when I approached. Skunks in the daytime? Probably NOT healthy, maybe Rabies, so I picked him up w/a shovel & buried him deep. That rifle took dozens of deer, a bear, and much paper--probably one of my favorite weapons. That said--I've gone "all .308" in the decades since. Perfect round for most of what I need to shoot--including potential bad guys while they're far enough away to not know I'm watching them.

Watching the Polo-clad guys with Barretts and .338s at the short range has me watching what I refer to as the "douchebag channel," as if it were a cable TV choice. These guys buy a gun with their "early-adopter," gotta have the best, glossy magazine & youtube fantasies; their too-fat wallets; and, their need to be the center of attention--thinking that the "shooters" at the range will think that they're just too awesome for words. I don't get it, but it's their money to waste, I guess. I just SMH & put another 3" group downrange.

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Old 01-27-2015, 06:29 PM   #107
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When ever a 338 shows up at the range at our club it very quickly clears out the shooters on either side. It's a lack of range etiquette imo.
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Old 01-27-2015, 06:55 PM   #108
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Why- Er..... could be cause its name sounds sexy,

like........labia.............poontang
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Old 01-27-2015, 08:12 PM   #109
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"Because in call of duty you can 420 quickscope all the noobz with it"
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Old 01-28-2015, 05:21 PM   #110
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Why? Why not?
Why do Idiot's buy 338 Lapua Magnums? - General Rifle Discussion

This sucker is HEAVY, BTW.
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