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Old 06-02-2010, 01:12 AM   #41
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I have had the same experience as Robo. I do however load 52gr Barnes and 53gr Speer HP's. Up to 65gr on the high side. 55 and 62 gr are the most common.

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Old 06-02-2010, 02:27 AM   #42
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The previous 2 posts are in reference to the .223, though the physics are the similar for different calibers.

The funny thing of ballistics is nothing is the same, and I mean nothing. I have been associated with top level benchrest competitors for the last 5 or 6 years. The detail that goes into what they do is somewhat indescribable.

Different lots of powder, change the accuracy. Different lots of bullets, change the accuracy. Every detail is covered by the best shooters. Wind, bullet drop, mirage from the heat of the barrel and the environment, even harmonics of the barrel are concerns for the top shelf shooters. Everything affects where the bullet hits.

You are doing great BigS. Keep reading and asking questions. Don't be worried about only shooting a .22. The practice now will make you a better shooter when you finally buy a what you want.

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Old 06-02-2010, 04:27 AM   #43
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Originally Posted by skullcrusher View Post
Bullets don't tend to drift based on spin mostly because the back end of a bullet is not conical like a football. They are squared off and flat so there is no drag on the hind end like a football. I was going for the easy analogy, not the pure scientific reality.

Bullets are affected by wind, temperature, elevation, humidity...and a mess of other stuff that is not normally relevant to plinking or paper shooting. I like to leave that up to the pros. That is why military snipers have spotters that use a mass of computations to get the ballistics correct. For most of us, that stuff does not matter, as we just want to put bullets down range into cans or paper for fun.

The lighter the bullet, the more the wind affects the point of impact. The heavier the bullet, the more gravity effect. Keep in mind that when a bullet leaves a barrel, it rises and then drops. The longer the distance, the greater the drop. For instance, a slug form a shotgun might hit dead center at 50 yards, but when shooting at 100 yards, the shooter may have to compensate several inches in height when aiming to hit the target center.
I was just watching a show on the history channel and they were saying bullets do tend to drift up and to the right a little bit due to the spin of the bullet, granted it won't be anything I would need to worry about but it makes me feel kinda smart.
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Old 06-02-2010, 04:32 AM   #44
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Originally Posted by bgeddes View Post
The previous 2 posts are in reference to the .223, though the physics are the similar for different calibers.

The funny thing of ballistics is nothing is the same, and I mean nothing. I have been associated with top level benchrest competitors for the last 5 or 6 years. The detail that goes into what they do is somewhat indescribable.

Different lots of powder, change the accuracy. Different lots of bullets, change the accuracy. Every detail is covered by the best shooters. Wind, bullet drop, mirage from the heat of the barrel and the environment, even harmonics of the barrel are concerns for the top shelf shooters. Everything affects where the bullet hits.

You are doing great BigS. Keep reading and asking questions. Don't be worried about only shooting a .22. The practice now will make you a better shooter when you finally buy a what you want.
Wow that amazing. It's kinda crazy anyone can even do that. And thank you, I intend to stick around and continue to learn.
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Old 06-02-2010, 04:40 AM   #45
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To say the fast twist barrels (1/7 - 1/9) do not shoot the light weight bullets well is, IMHO, an over generalization. Perhaps the definition of light weight and heavy weight needs to be clarified. I consider any bullet UNDER 55 grains to be a light weight. Any bullet OVER 61 grains to be a heavy weight. 55-61 being mid-weight. My 1/7 and 1/9 barrels shoot 55's and 64's fine. I don't see much of a need (for my purposes) for anything outside that range.

The big problem with the "light weight" bullets is they tend to have thin jackets (designed for thinskinned varmints). These bullets are designed to be shot through slow twist barrels (1/12) and then be explosive on impact. The fast twist barrels spin the bullets so fast the thin jackets can become damaged causing erratic accuracy and even in flight fragmentation. I have seen the tell tale gray "Puff" about 10-15 feet from the muzzle indicating the bullet disintigrated in flight.

For general plinking with 55gr FMJBT (M-193) ammo in a fast twist barrel you will generally not see any problems because the jacket is relatively thick and holds up well to the torsional forces.
Okay so what should I be looking at? Around 1/10 or 1/11?
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Old 06-02-2010, 05:00 AM   #46
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Wow that amazing. It's kinda crazy anyone can even do that. And thank you, I intend to stick around and continue to learn.
That was the best line I've read in this thread: And thank you, I intend to stick around and continue to learn.[/ That's what this whole damned place is about.
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Old 06-02-2010, 06:42 PM   #47
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This is a book I bought a few months ago and it is quite good for alot of the info you want to learn about.

Applied Ballistics For Long Range Shooting
By Bryan Litz

Book

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Old 06-05-2010, 03:07 AM   #48
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There are several very good rifles to consider. For shooting paper and cans and such I'd suggest a varmint rifle with a heavier barrel. Weatherby and Howa make decent rifles, but you'll have to pay more for those with a guarantee of accuracy. The Thompson Center Icon is another solid rifle that won't break the bank. The Marlin is another decent entry level rifle, but accuracy is somewhat hit or miss. The Savage 12's are very good, but with the accustock and accutrigger the price goes up. There is always the Remington 700 which can bought very reasonably, but the lower end stocks are pretty much junk. Accessories are much easier to find for the 700, and there are a lot of smiths who are knowledgable of the platform, so upgrades will be relatively easy. You also have to consider mounts, rings, and optics, which are a necessity. Do not skimp too much on the optics. In that department I'd suggest the Super Sniper 10x42(around $300) or one of the Vortex Vipers($350-$450). Both are very good quality scopes with excellent warranties and I doubt you will be dissatisfied with either one. As to rings I'd suggest the Burris Signature Zee rings. I suggest these because they do away with the need to lap the scope rings and the inserts will allow you to add MOA for longer distances, or compensate for mount holes that are not drilled precisely.

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Old 06-11-2010, 09:09 AM   #49
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I have to commend you on your enquiring mind, Big. I've been target shooting for about a year now and it should have occured to ask a lot of the questions you've already thought of here. Just been kinda trying to learn thru osmosis which is not that efficient, probably!

Good for you

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