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Old 07-07-2009, 02:21 AM   #11
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To be totally honest Matt, I can't see the bullet in flight from a .308, but I've never tried to look for it either. Maby it's because my eyes are on target only through the scope I'm spotting with. Or it could be the range I shoot at due to the fact that it is an area of low humidity and temperatures at this area are high in the dry season. Also, the more magnification we use in our scopes causes their own mirage affect. My brother, on the other hand, claims during the late winter and spring months, when the ground is green with growth and the weather is cold, usually in the morning, he can see the air distort somewhat from the bullet flight.

I've seen this on TV shows about sniper target competitions, but the cameras they use on these shows pick up things the human eye may not be able to see in real time. Also I think they may slow the playback down on these shots of bullets and the air they distort in flight.

Something I'll have to look for the next time my brother and I go shooting.

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Old 07-07-2009, 03:45 AM   #12
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Originally Posted by matt g View Post
I guess I'm asking how a spotter would benefit a long distance sport shooter, rather than a professional marksman.
They can view the 'trace'/impact and give data corrections.

Here is what you will see when viewing 'trace' through optics:


You will see the disturbance in the air, it is brief but visible, just focus your attention above the targets.
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Old 07-07-2009, 03:57 PM   #13
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To be totally honest Matt, I can't see the bullet in flight from a .308, but I've never tried to look for it either. Maby it's because my eyes are on target only through the scope I'm spotting with. Or it could be the range I shoot at due to the fact that it is an area of low humidity and temperatures at this area are high in the dry season. Also, the more magnification we use in our scopes causes their own mirage affect. My brother, on the other hand, claims during the late winter and spring months, when the ground is green with growth and the weather is cold, usually in the morning, he can see the air distort somewhat from the bullet flight.

I've seen this on TV shows about sniper target competitions, but the cameras they use on these shows pick up things the human eye may not be able to see in real time. Also I think they may slow the playback down on these shots of bullets and the air they distort in flight.

Something I'll have to look for the next time my brother and I go shooting.
I shoot .45 ACP mostly. You can see the slow, massive .45 bullet in direct sunlight, which is why I was asking.
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Old 07-07-2009, 08:54 PM   #14
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I always bring a spotter to range when shooting non-scoped guns. I lose my focus when I keep going back and forth between shooting and scope. I can get my groupings together faster and my grove going with someone calling out shot placements.

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Old 07-07-2009, 11:19 PM   #15
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I don't feel like reading, I want the instant gratification that only the internet can deliver.

I'll have to pick those books up.
Dude! That's some funny S**t right there! That's EXACTLY the way I feel!
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Old 07-10-2009, 07:05 AM   #16
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Mrm14, do you find that you can see the bullet in flight when shooting a .308?
The easiest way to see bullet trace is to set the spotting scope around 20x and slightly out of focus. In my experience, its easiest to see on shots of 400yds and over.

As far as a spotter goes, they should position themselves as close to the shooter as possible without making contact, and as directly behind the rifle as possible.

When I'm shooting with a spotter, I like to have a system for everything that happens before, during, and after the shot. Usually what happens, is we'll get into postion and settled. The spotter then calls out the target and gives the range, I'll repeat the information so there is no misunderstanding.

Once the target is ranged and the scope has been adjusted accordingly, I'll look to see what the wind is doing. I can usually get a pretty good idea from looking down range with the rifle scope, but I'll always ask for a wind call from the spotter. It's way easier to read wind through a good spotting scope than a rifle scope. Once the wind has been accounted for, I'll settle in and slow my breathing to prepare for the shot. When I'm ready to take the shot, I'll tell the spotter that I'm on target, the spotter will then tell me to either "send it", or to hold if we need to wait for the wind or some other factor. Once I take the shot, I'll make my call as to where I beleive POI was. The spotter will then confirm it a hit or a miss, and what adjustments need to be made. The appropriate adjustments are made, and the the process repeats itself for the next shot.

I hope this helps
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