Rifling and Muzzle Rise
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:07 AM   #1
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Default Rifling and Muzzle Rise

Shamelessly pulled this from another forum. It is part of a larger
post about muzzle brakes--but this clip is not out of context.


Comments? Personally I am just a wee bit skeptical.

"The actual physics that cause the barrel to rise is the the spin on the bullet (i.e. the twist rate) - change the rifling to the other direction and the barrel would go down not up. I think that the concept of rifling a barrel must have been invented in the northern hemisphere by right handed people."
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:09 AM   #2
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Interesting theory. Subscribed. I'd like to hear more about this.
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:20 AM   #3
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If the projectile comes out at a downward spin, change the length a bit and it comes out at an upward spin. Manufacturers don't cut barrels at a specific exit angle.
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:20 AM   #4
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I thought it was worth sharing. It does bring to mind one question---
Smoothbore guns (old musket, shotgun), having no rifling twist
would by this theory have neither muzzle rise nor dip.

From my own observation over the years, this doesn't seem to be
the case. Odd.
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:25 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillM
Smoothbore guns (old musket, shotgun), having no rifling twist
would by this theory have neither muzzle rise nor dip.
Cannons too.
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:33 AM   #6
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This got me thinking. We could possibly calculate this by finding the rotational force of a given bullet (Rotational force = moment of inertia x rotational acceleration) and then finding the direction the force is going and comparing that that to a bullet spinning in an opposite direction.

Here's what I think the results would be. I think any upward or downward force that the bullet puts on the barrel would be negligible. The reason for the muzzle flip is you. On a gun (both long gun and hand gun) your hands are positioned mostly on the bottom of the gun, below the barrel. on a long gun, your shoulder is also positioned mostly below the barrel. This means you act as a fulcrum, and you cause the muzzle rise.

Shoot a gun upside-down (not advisable) and you would most likely still see muzzle rise.
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Old 07-11-2013, 01:42 AM   #7
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If you hold a gun sideways, do you still experience muzzle climb.
http://replyask.lc.mwh.www.ask.com/wiki/Muzzle_rise
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Old 07-11-2013, 02:40 AM   #8
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BS. Some guns do have left hand twist, and others have right hand twist, smooth bores have no twist. They all have muzzle climb. Probably more to do with bore height, stock angle/drop at the comb, and physical contact with the gun that drives the muzzle upward.
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Old 07-11-2013, 02:56 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by texaswoodworker View Post

Shoot a gun upside-down (not advisable) and you would most likely still see muzzle rise.
Actually, the muzzle goes down when you shoot one upside down. At least
on a revolver and a 1911 (watch that slide!)--both of which I have tried.

Reason? Because with the gun upside down, the resistance your body imparts
(the fulcrum) is now ABOVE the centerline of the bore.

Come to think of it, I've also shot my 1100 Remington upside down.
Little bit of muzzle dip with that one too.
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Old 07-11-2013, 03:06 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillM View Post
Actually, the muzzle goes down when you shoot one upside down. At least
on a revolver and a 1911 (watch that slide!)--both of which I have tried.

Reason? Because with the gun upside down, the resistance your body imparts
(the fulcrum) is now ABOVE the centerline of the bore.


Come to think of it, I've also shot my 1100 Remington upside down.
Little bit of muzzle dip with that one too.
That would be correct.

On the 1100, were your hands above or below the bore? I'm guessing that they were more above it.
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