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-   -   Refinishing the stock of a numbers matching MN M44? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f18/refinishing-stock-numbers-matching-mn-m44-73520/)

12fretter 10-01-2012 09:37 PM

Refinishing the stock of a numbers matching MN M44?
 
First, a question: What is meant by "Forced Match" when referring to numbers matching on a Mosin Nagant M44?

Second, all my numbers match. Typically, I'm not a big "value" enthusiast. The gun is a tool. It's a great gun. It's accurate, it's fun and it scares the crap out of people when they don't know it's coming. I didn't care about its value when it was given to me. But, on the other hand, I don't want to discount the possibility of a future heirloom.

All that said, the stock looks like crap. I'm a woodworker and I know how to finish wood. I'm seriously thinking of stripping this down and refinishing it. If this were a Martin Guitar, I would know just what to do based on the age and model number. But I don't know about rifles as I do with Martin guitars.

I'm thinking it's no big deal. So what if I ruin the value of it, especially when the value is probably just a couple hundred dollars.

Opinions?

therewolf 10-01-2012 11:03 PM

In mint condition, never fired, it's worth @250$.

But the prices, they are a rising...

"Force Matched" refers to serial numbers which

were re-stamped, or electro-penciled on.

Force matching is usually done to help keep a set group

of parts together on a partially matching rifle.

If your Bolt, Barrel, Buttplate, and Magazine match, it's

matched serials, on a M44.

Be wary of any work on original parts. Most folks want the

rifle in original condition.

So if you intend to keep it permanently, change it as you please,

but NEVER assume any change, no matter how nice, will

please others, in the event of resale...

osprey176 10-02-2012 08:08 PM

If you really are concerned about value,why not keep the original but refinish a replacement stock?They are easy to find,and cheap too.You can learn and refine your technique on a cheap stock,so if you screw it up,no harm,no foul.

12fretter 10-03-2012 01:07 AM

I'm not concerned at all about the value if the value is $250 or less, which is appears to be. I don't even think I'd care if it were $1000. And I don't intend on messing up the refinish, but I get your point. The good news in all this is that stocks are not numbered at all. So if I buy a stock stock (pun) no one will ever know. Somehow, I don't think anyone would mind a refinished stock on an otherwise original rifle. Of course, if we were talking vintage Martin guitars, that would be sacrilege.

Old_Crow 10-03-2012 04:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 12fretter (Post 962101)
I'm not concerned at all about the value if the value is $250 or less, which is appears to be. I don't even think I'd care if it were $1000. And I don't intend on messing up the refinish, but I get your point. The good news in all this is that stocks are not numbered at all. So if I buy a stock stock (pun) no one will ever know. Somehow, I don't think anyone would mind a refinished stock on an otherwise original rifle. Of course, if we were talking vintage Martin guitars, that would be sacrilege.

Collectors want a stock that is period correct. A refinished stock is going to shine like a penny on pavement. Not like the Mosin is going to be collectable. That is like saving red milk caps because some day plastic is going to be replaced.

therewolf 10-03-2012 04:36 PM

I redid my stock on my Polish M44 with Minwax Ebony .

Now it's a "black rifle". Of course, the M44 is also one of

the original actual "assault rifles" also, as

it was used to storm the Wehrmacht trenches ,

on the Eastern Front, and especially for clearing buildings,

in cities and towns, late in WWII.


But I have no intention of ever selling my M44. I imagine that,

even though it looks great, IMO, the next person would not

consider it an improvement in the rifle's value.

robertusa123 10-03-2012 04:38 PM

if your gun has forced match numbers than as far as im concerned its not ornigial. go ahead and refinish it just dont cheep out and it will not be done in a weekend i spent 3 weeks doing my 91-30 with all the drying time


http://i69.photobucket.com/albums/i4...9301308111.jpg

12fretter 10-03-2012 05:17 PM

I thought about black, but I think I'm going the hybrid way... The main stock will be natural but the top piece above the barrel will be black.

I'm also thinking of automotive clear coat as it will provide the best protection against the elements and won't stress when the barrel heats up.

But there is no way it should take three weeks to cure. What were you using?

therewolf 10-03-2012 05:20 PM

I'd be sure you specifically like the work.

Do it in your favorite stain. IMO,

anything has to look better than that

wonky red crap it's done in, now.

Old_Crow 10-03-2012 06:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 12fretter (Post 962921)
I thought about black, but I think I'm going the hybrid way... The main stock will be natural but the top piece above the barrel will be black.

I'm also thinking of automotive clear coat as it will provide the best protection against the elements and won't stress when the barrel heats up.

But there is no way it should take three weeks to cure. What were you using?

Every coat needs at least 24 hours to dry. 2 weeks drying time is average for a professional quality finish.


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