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-   -   Questions/Help regarding mounting a scope (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f18/questions-help-regarding-mounting-scope-46659/)

ACRhino 08-11-2011 03:28 PM

Questions/Help regarding mounting a scope
 
I want to talk process and steps, not about brands and such. At least for now.

The low down:
I found an only late 1960’s Ruger 10/22 in my old mans closet and it was rusted and gunked up. I cleaned it all out nice and got it shooting again and decided to mount a scope on it. No it’s not a $50,000 scope and I don’t have laser guided precision nanobots to assist in the install.

Here is what I did:
The 10/22 had a little rail mount on the receiver as you would expect. When I put the scope on and tightened everything down I used a bore sight and at 25 yrds the laser dot was off center to the left by half way and to low by about half way as well, meaning essentially that the sight was aimed too high and too far to the right of the barrel. When I adjusted the L/R and elevation on the scope I essentially had to adjust in all the way in both directions to get the scope and bore sight centered. This however would be unacceptable because there is no more room for adjustment either to the right or to go up.

http://i451.photobucket.com/albums/q...lfl/reddot.jpg

So I took the scope off and adjusted the L/R and elevation to be in the middle of the dial so there was plenty of room for adjustment either way. I then used electrical tape and pretty much put that in the needed areas on the eyelets so when the scope rested in them the tape would force the scope to correct itself by cradling it when the eyelets were tightened down. Doing this I was able to get the bore sight and the scope to perfectly center … however I used a lot of tape and just doesn’t seem like the right way to go about it.

So I assume that the best way to go about this would be to go to a gunsmith and have them center the rail better since it’s an old rifle and I’m sure it is off. Since I’m not going to do that, what is the best process for mounting a scope?

hiwall 08-11-2011 04:06 PM

first I would have have shot it instead of basing everything off the boresiter. Not saying its not right but I would want to be sure. while it is possible the holes in the receiver are off that is unlikely. the base could be a reject but unlikely. the rings could be rejects but unlikely. could be a bad scope but unlikely. most likely it is the boresiter. You could change the rings and bases to some that have windage adjustment(like Leupold).

HOSSFLY 08-12-2011 12:15 AM

Go back to square one-
GET RID OF THE TAPE-
Mount the scope & SHOOT IT-
See what happens :rolleyes:

alxltd1 08-13-2011 03:59 PM

So first the guidance of removing the tape and starting fresh is sound. Yes using the tape to adjust the alignment of the scope via the rings (I assume that is what you are calling the eyelets) instead of the scope internal windage and elevation is conceptually correct. I would suggest you do a search on Google for “scope mounting procedures” where you will find a number of articles that describe various ways to make sure that your base and rings are in alignment with the bore and level. You can then adjust the windage via the rings and elevation if needed via shimming the base. You should also invest in some alignment bars to make this easier and can be used again and again. You could also lap the rings to ensure that the scope will lay in the aligned rings without any binding what so ever. Mounting correctly should bring you, after bore sighting, very close to zero and the internal adjustments using the scope’s windage and elevation should be minimal. Good luck.

HOSSFLY 08-13-2011 04:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by alxltd1 (Post 562214)
So first the guidance of removing the tape and starting fresh is sound.
Quote:

Yes using the tape to adjust the alignment of the scope via the rings (I assume that is what you are calling the eyelets) instead of the scope internal windage and elevation is conceptually correct.
I would suggest you do a search on Google for “scope mounting procedures” where you will find a number of articles that describe various ways to make sure that your base and rings are in alignment with the bore and level. You can then adjust the windage via the rings and elevation if needed via shimming the base. You should also invest in some alignment bars to make this easier and can be used again and again. You could also lap the rings to ensure that the scope will lay in the aligned rings without any binding what so ever. Mounting correctly should bring you, after bore sighting, very close to zero and the internal adjustments using the scope’s windage and elevation should be minimal. Good luck.

That is correct (in a way out there way) but thats why they used to use the Unertl type scope mounts - :rolleyes:

alxltd1 08-13-2011 11:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by HOSSFLY (Post 562222)
That is correct (in a way out there way) but thats why they used to use the Unertl type scope mounts - :rolleyes:

Agree. The point I was making was that using the rings and bases, especially with adjustable rings, rather than the scope internal adjustments would leave him with much more adjustment capability after mounting correctly. Using the the tape on the rings to force the scope to align with the bore is in a way "adjustable" rings though I think it would be hard to market to the gun enthusiast.:)

lonyaeger 08-14-2011 12:04 AM

Those 10/22 rails are notorious for being a little loosey-goosey. Is yours metal or plastic?

I would start by making sure you have a good, solid base and that the screws are secured with Loctite. Then think about the rings...I doubt you'll ever have a good, repeatable zero if you're using tape to shim them one way or the other.

Ruling those things out, then you'd want to look at the scope.....what kind is it?


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