One question for the experts
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Old 07-20-2009, 06:50 AM   #1
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Default One question for the experts

Hi there everyone. Speaking of bolt action rifles.
I have always wondered what the difference is between long barrel rifle and a short barrel, to be more specific: I love rifles who look like the WWII german Karabiner. For example, in this picture:

http://www.republicofnewhome.org/images/travel/winchester_guns/img_0383a.jpg

I like the design on the third from the bottom up, now my question is: what kind of rifle is that?, because the barrel is short and the wooden part is long compared to the others and modern hunting rifles. Also do they still make them? if so could somebody post a make and model of a rifle that is being manufactured today that lookes like those.

Thanks in advance.

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Old 07-20-2009, 12:23 PM   #2
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Long barrels (30+") were standard up til the end of WWI. Smokeless powder was still in its infancy and needed the longer tube to burn off completely. With the advances in powder technology, shorter barrels were more common as the powder was more efficient. A carbine (Karabiner) from WWII is still longer than most modern rifles, again further advances in the chemistry.

The third from the bottom appears to be a P-17 Enfield. Caliber .30-06 US service rifle. Easier and cheaper to make than the Springfield '03 model. P-17's were fine rifles that shoot quite well.

As far as wood stock length, military rifles had long front wood just "because". They preferred that style for some reason. It also allowed the bayonet lug to be incorporated into the forend and not just hang off. The rifle that most diverged from this style was the Johnson rifle the US Marine Corps used in WWII on a limited basis.

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Old 07-21-2009, 08:52 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by robocop10mm View Post
Long barrels (30+") were standard up til the end of WWI. Smokeless powder was still in its infancy and needed the longer tube to burn off completely. With the advances in powder technology, shorter barrels were more common as the powder was more efficient. A carbine (Karabiner) from WWII is still longer than most modern rifles, again further advances in the chemistry.

The third from the bottom appears to be a P-17 Enfield. Caliber .30-06 US service rifle. Easier and cheaper to make than the Springfield '03 model. P-17's were fine rifles that shoot quite well.

As far as wood stock length, military rifles had long front wood just "because". They preferred that style for some reason. It also allowed the bayonet lug to be incorporated into the forend and not just hang off. The rifle that most diverged from this style was the Johnson rifle the US Marine Corps used in WWII on a limited basis.
Hey, thanks for your response. You do know your guns. I still wonder tou if I was to purchase one that has those characteristics, how would I ask for it. And more important yet... are they still making them? if so, any brand and make?
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Old 07-21-2009, 12:56 PM   #4
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P-17's have not been made (even copies) for a LONG time. They made a butt load of them while in production. They are available but quite collectable. The price never goes down. Many are out there that have been butchered (Sporterized). They have NO collector value.

There are many rifles available on the surplus market that have the same characteristics;
1903 Springfield
P-17 Enfield
SMLE (British Enfield)
Various Mausers from countries like Germany, Belgium, Turkey and most South American countries (even though most were made in Europe)
Spain (in 7mm, 8mm, and .308)
Russia/Soviet Union (Mosin-Nagant)
Yugoslavia
Czechoslovakia

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Old 08-01-2009, 05:12 PM   #5
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I agree, its an Eddystone 1917 Enfield, cool piece of history, starting to get expensive, saw one at the show 2 weekends ago for $595, little high if you ask me, $300-350 would be more reasonable.

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Old 08-01-2009, 06:08 PM   #6
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Remington retooled them actions and turned them into the Model 30 Express. I have one of each.

The 1917 Remington Enfield actions is a good strong action. It is BIG thought and because more of the action is machined away in the middle so it is a bit more flexing that other actions.

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