Mosin Nagant
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Old 07-16-2013, 10:05 PM   #1
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Default Mosin Nagant

I am looking at buying a Mosin Nagant. I have looked on here at the threads and was wondering if there was any difference in accuracy or overall performance between the round receiver or the hexagonal receiver? I know from online that the Mosin's with the hexagonal receiver are priced higher than the round receivers are higher. . . being so, I figured there must be a difference between the two, where the hexagonal receiver is better. . why is that?

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Old 07-16-2013, 10:19 PM   #2
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No practical difference in accuracy. I have had both. The biggest factor in accuracy on the MN 91/30 is the bore condition.

The reason thta people prefeer teh hex recievers is because they are generally finished nicer. The Russians stopped the hex receivers to speed up and simplify production. In the peak of action between the Russians and the Nazis even more machining steps were cut out, and they would use milling dies that were pretty worn, and the receivers show it in the score marks. So the round receiver war time rifles have some of the worst appearance, and that reputation has made them also have less value to some collectors. If you get a hex receiver you are guaranteed pre-war production, while taking a round receiver rifle, opens the possibility of a rough looking rifle. I'll try to post some pics later of a war time receiver and a pre-war hex receiver so you can see the aesthetic differences.

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Old 07-16-2013, 10:28 PM   #3
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Thanks doc, I also was wondering that, I noticed my local mom and pop site had a couple creates along with the big box store, one is roughly 200 and the other place is 150ish.

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Old 07-17-2013, 12:20 AM   #4
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Here is a look at a 1943 war-time round receiver compared to a 1925 Hex. Both are made by Izshevsk, but you can see where some of the manufacturing cut backs occurred to speed production. Both guns shoot about the same.

Notice that on the hex receiver the area in front and behind the stripper clip guide is dished out to give it a bit more of a sloped appearance and reduce weight, while the 1943 has what is referred to as a "hi-wall" that is left in the raw machined state, and has a lot of chatter marks from the machining equipment.


The markings ont the 1943 are simple, and lightly struck.


The 1925 has more elaborate markings, that are deeply struck into the receiver, and the hex area is nice and smooth.


A better look at the chatter marks and the "hi-wall" on the 1943


Again, as far as function goes, there is no real notable difference. But in manufacturing time and attention, the pre-war rifle shows more attention and time invested in the manufacturing.

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Old 07-17-2013, 02:58 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SSGN_Doc
Here is a look at a 1943 war-time round receiver compared to a 1925 Hex. Both are made by Izshevsk, but you can see where some of the manufacturing cut backs occurred to speed production. Both guns shoot about the same.

Notice that on the hex receiver the area in front and behind the stripper clip guide is dished out to give it a bit more of a sloped appearance and reduce weight, while the 1943 has what is referred to as a "hi-wall" that is left in the raw machined state, and has a lot of chatter marks from the machining equipment.

The markings ont the 1943 are simple, and lightly struck.

The 1925 has more elaborate markings, that are deeply struck into the receiver, and the hex area is nice and smooth.

A better look at the chatter marks and the "hi-wall" on the 1943

Again, as far as function goes, there is no real notable difference. But in manufacturing time and attention, the pre-war rifle shows more attention and time invested in the manufacturing.
Thanks Doc. The pics really help and clarify everything you said. I guess it would be a good idea to try to get the hex receiver, but like you said it is about the bore condition.

I've read on another thread that You can check the bore condition by inserting the bullet into the end of the barrel and if it only goes about halfway in then it's good but if it goes completely in and touched brass then it is lesser than the previous. Does this seem logical?
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Old 07-17-2013, 03:02 AM   #6
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Sounds logical, but it can depend on how deep the bullet is seated in the case neck, and where the ogive if the bullet is (the area wher the bullet begins to get narrower as you head toward the point).

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Old 07-17-2013, 03:08 AM   #7
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Ahhh... Haha that was too easy. I should start reviewing my questions before hitting the send button..

One last question: I have read that the Mosin Nagants were submerged into a liquid coat to help protect them after the war.. I can't remember what it's called. But do you have to worry about 'baking' or cleaning your Mosin for a lack of better terms because of this protective coating? Or does it not matter and you don't have to mess with it when bought?

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Old 07-17-2013, 03:21 AM   #8
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Mine were covered in Cosmoline. It is s mix of oil, kerosene and bees wax. I removed the metal parts from the stock and used mineral spirits to clean them off. The wood was set in Georgia sunshine wrapped in newspaper to help sweat out the grease. Mineral spirits woul remove some of the varnish off the stock, so I avoided chemical cleaning there.

The varnish seemed to help keep the grease from penetrating too deep into the wood, and I haven't had major problems of continued grease coming out of the stocks when I take them out to the range or field. But it's still a habit to take rags with me in case I do need to wipe them down.

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Old 07-17-2013, 06:00 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by southpawgunner
Ahhh... Haha that was too easy. I should start reviewing my questions before hitting the send button..

One last question: I have read that the Mosin Nagants were submerged into a liquid coat to help protect them after the war.. I can't remember what it's called. But do you have to worry about 'baking' or cleaning your Mosin for a lack of better terms because of this protective coating? Or does it not matter and you don't have to mess with it when bought?
Let me start by saying yes yes yes you need to clean off the cosmoline before shooting it, not only for the way it feels but because it will affect the function of the bolt when it gets warm. It's called sticky bolt and if you don't get it all out you will face this problem. That being said there's a million different ways on how people do it and the chemicals they use to do it. I recommend going on YouTube and checking out a bunch of different ways to do it, then pick whatever you think suits you best. Good luck and if you get a Mosin let us know!! And remember, pics or it didn't happen
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Old 07-17-2013, 06:08 PM   #10
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I've been thinking about getting the M44 Russian model myself. I like the "carbine" size

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