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Old 03-29-2010, 09:20 PM   #21
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All bullets start to drop at the same rate as soon as they leave the barrel, no matter how fast they come out. The difference is how far they travel in a given amount of time. A faster bullet will travel farther before it drops, say 4', than a slower bullet. It is considered to be a "flatter" shooting cartridge.
Another thing that affects long range ballistics is the point at which the bullet velocity crosses back to a sub-sonic speed. The .308, for instance, runs under the speed of sound right around the 1000 yard mark, depending on the individual bullet design. This induces buffeting on the bullet and adversely affects its ability to stay on its flight path. The faster a bullet starts out, and the higher the ballistic coefficient (bc) the "flatter" it will fly and the farther out it will stay supersonic. It still drops the same as any other bullet over time, it just is farther down range in that same amount of time as a slower bullet or one with a lower bc would be.

A pretty decent bc for a normal hunting bullet would be in the .500 range, with velocities in the 2800 fps range. By comparison, the .50 BMG bullets have bc's exceeding 1.000 at that same 2800 fps velocity. With a 200 yard zero, the .50 drops about 223 inches at 1000 yards shooting a 750 grain Hornady A-max. Shooting another bullet with a .500 bc at 2800 fps gives a 1000 yard drop of about 322 inches. That's a difference of more than 8'.

Exterior ballistics is a science unto itself and I am constantly learning new things about long range shooting.

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Old 04-03-2010, 02:40 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by willshoum View Post
I had the opp. to shoot this awsome riflle, ofcourse it was only one shot because of the limited amount of ammo. I filled a one gal. plastic paint can with water and tapped down on the lid. set this on a 55 gal drum. Stepped off about 100 yrds. Looking thru the scope I could almost read the print. I was expecting alot of recoil, but to my surprise it was no worse than 20 ga. field load. This was a sight to behold when that round went thru that can filled with water. the plastic pieces were scattered all over and the steel cover was shaped like chineese wok. You can get the low down doing search on Lazzeroni rifles. Check out thier site on long distance shooting. Wills in da swamp in La. One shot One Kill.
Lazzeroni is obviously as much a showman as P. T. Barnum. Using the exploading jug of water to impress people with the power of a rifle is certainly not new. Truth be known you could probably get near duplicate results with a 25-06 pushing a 75 grain bullet at 3500 FPS, any of the 7 mm Mags with 120 grain bullets and a pile of 300 mag cartribges to name a few. What Mr. Lazzeroni probably did not say is that you will probably loose darn near 50% of your meat because it will be so blood shot as to not be edibable, that to get the quoted velocities you will need a 26 inch barrel, to tame the recoil to what most shooters can tolerate you will need a muzzle break, that firing this rifle without ear / hearing protection will most certainly damage your hearing very quickly, that you will almost never find a box of his ammo at typical retailers and that ammo is so expensive when y ou do find it (about $5.00 per bang) that you will not shoot it much and not learn how to use the tool you have bought, which makes all of its advantages useless!

Think about the fact that Winchester, Remington and Ruger have financial resources beyond what any individual probably has and could develop cartridges producing the highest possible velocities. With the exception of the Rem. Ultra Mags they have all gone to short compact mags basically duplicating or slightly improving on existing cartridges but doing it in short actioned rifles with 24 not 26 inch barrels for shooter convenience.

Lazzaroni cartridges do produce the highest velocities per caliber, but anyone who thinks that velocity and power are a substitute for shooter skill, who lost a deer last year with a 30-06 because of poor shot placement when they jerked the trigger and now think that a new 300 Macho Mag is the answer are just cruising down the wrong path.
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Old 04-04-2010, 03:31 PM   #23
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Default Lazz 7.82

In response to PT Barnum, This was no advertisement for Lazz. rifle. This was what I wanted to shoot at, There were no deer in site to prove what you stated, Iv'e dressed deer that have been shot with various guns and alot of times I had to discard meat because of poor shot placement. One such Buck was shot in the rear end with a 7 mm mag and the bullet exited thru the neck. Poor shot placement. This Rifle is not for the average Joe the Plumber. As for as the amount of blood in the meat, I have my own way to deal with that. As I stated, this was only a response to Long Range Shooting, Not an Add Or gimmick to sell Lazz. Rifles. Wills in da Swamp In La. One Shot One Kill..........
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Old 04-04-2010, 09:10 PM   #24
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I bought what turned out to a very good book for me on external ballistics a short while ago.

"Applied Ballistics For Long Range Shooting"
Written by Bryan Litz

The book is written in such a way that the average shooter can understand and apply to their shooting skills.
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Old 04-04-2010, 09:38 PM   #25
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Default Where Ballistic Coefficient Came From

Another interesting article written by Sierra regarding Ballistic Coefficient

http://www.exteriorballistics.com/ebexplained/articles/the_ballistic_coefficient.pdf
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Old 04-29-2010, 07:42 PM   #26
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Default Long Range Shooting

I need an Expert Opinion from some of you that shoot long range often. Explain to me what is Bullet tracing to the target and air distortion. Wills in da oilly Swamp in La.
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Old 04-29-2010, 08:18 PM   #27
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Nice post Opaww

another book i would recommend to all if you want to read or listen to some technical narratives of several sniping missions is:

triggermen

i'm listening to it currently about a quarter ways into it, pretty good so far....
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Old 04-30-2010, 06:09 AM   #28
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Will. Don't claim to be an expert but I have seen several times what you are are probably referring to Bullet Tracing. When shooting my 219 Imp. Zipper if you got directly behind the shooter and did not blink your eyes when the shot was made you could frequently see what could best be described like a vapor trail from the muzzle to the target. This existed for only a split second and then disappeared. What I speculate caused this is that the humedity was fairly high and when the bullet which was traveling at 3500+ FPS passed through the air it maybe caused a a high pressure situation that cused the moisture in the air to condense for a very short period of time. When conditions were right my dad could follow the "trace" of a bullet to the target and tell where the impact was.

The other thing I have seen when shooting in 600 and 1,000 yard matches when using a good spotting scope you could actually see the affect a bullet would have on the mirage, as it traveled to the target. It is hard to describe but it was like following a distortion in the mirage that was traveling very fast toward the target. One of our shooters was an ex military advanced mardsmanship unit shooter and he would watch that mirage / bullet path to the target and be able to tell where the impact of the bullet was prior to the target being pulled and the spooter inserted.

Both of these were rather interesting to see.
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Old 04-30-2010, 12:18 PM   #29
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I dont have much experience with rifles past the normal deer range (50-100 yards, iron sights, .32 level action) and about the same with my shotgun. I would be extremely happy if I had a minute of deer shot at 400 yards. Just never done it.

It would be a fun thing to do some shooting at 1000+ yards, but I doubt I would be within 3 feet of paper / metal with my knowledge of distance shooting. Just never done it before and dont know anybody with that much land around here to try it on.

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Old 04-30-2010, 07:58 PM   #30
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The bullets trace is easily seen through a sotting scope positioned behind the shooter. When I'm shooting particularily well and my position is good, I can see my own bullet's trace through the riflescope (20 power). One competitor says, when everything's right, he can see the muzzle flash and watch the bullet hit. At longer ranges and in twitchy conditions, it's interesting to see the bullet follow an "S" shaped path on a parabolic curve toward the target. GD
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