Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Long Guns > General Rifle Discussion > Help buying a Leverguns

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-13-2011, 05:31 PM   #41
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
fatmidgets's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Posts: 173
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by therewolf
44-40 is an old caliber which was popular in the old west,

especially with the "common cartridge" crowd, as you had

44-40 levers and wheel guns which would share the same bullets.

The.44 Remington Magnum has superior ballistics, and is much

cheaper, more popular,and easier to find today, both in guns and

bullets.

But, if you can bear the added expense of rarity, and you prefer it,

44-40 is still available.
I know Frank James, brother of Jessie James, favored the 44-40 cartridge because he could keep the same rounds for his pistol and levergun.
__________________
fatmidgets is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-13-2011, 06:43 PM   #42
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Hinermad's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Rochester,NY
Posts: 75
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by jismail View Post
Is this due to the longer barrel producing more 'burn time' for the powder thus developing more pressure for the same round?
I believe it's more a matter of how long the compressed combustion gases are able to push against the bullet. Once the bullet leaves the barrel it's no longer subjected to that pressure. Longer barrel = longer push.

For a cartridge that expels a lot of unburned powder from a pistol barrel (i.e. lots of muzzle flash) a rifle barrel may allow time for the powder to burn more completely, which will help increase velocity too.

Dave
__________________

"Your superior intellect is no match for our puny weapons!"
- The Simpsons

Hinermad is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2011, 04:18 AM   #43
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
tomingreeneco's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: Greene County,PA
Posts: 181
Liked 13 Times on 11 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Hinermad View Post
I believe it's more a matter of how long the compressed combustion gases are able to push against the bullet. Once the bullet leaves the barrel it's no longer subjected to that pressure. Longer barrel = longer push.

For a cartridge that expels a lot of unburned powder from a pistol barrel (i.e. lots of muzzle flash) a rifle barrel may allow time for the powder to burn more completely, which will help increase velocity too.

Dave
Basically correct. That is why the powder used for pistol rounds is fast burning and the powder used in rifle rounds burns a little slower. If you used rifle powder in a pistol the bullet would leave the barrel before you would get the full effect from the powder. (You should NOT use rifle powder in a pistol round). I do know people that do use rifle powder in pistol rounds to be shot from a rifle only. I do not as I do not want to mix them up and use them in the wrong gun. Getting a little older now and do not want to have to remember too many things.
__________________
tomingreeneco is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-14-2011, 02:56 PM   #44
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Pasco Cty.FL
Posts: 6,445
Liked 2394 Times on 1363 Posts
Likes Given: 1886

Default

Well, if it's the .44 Remington Magnum you're worried about,

try the Speer 270 grain Hunting JSPs. They rock in my rifle,

and cycle my pistol easy as pie...

__________________
therewolf is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Buying a new. 45 leo84 Semi-Auto Handguns 19 07-30-2011 06:31 PM
what to look for, buying a cc gun. Tailypoe General Handgun Discussion 35 06-19-2011 01:52 AM
Buying in CT and MA easterner123 AK & SKS Discussion 5 03-05-2011 02:19 AM
Pls help me in buying a gun rupa Auto & Semi-Auto Discussion 20 02-13-2010 07:47 PM