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-   -   Heirloom (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f18/heirloom-101812/)

tzem68 12-20-2013 11:29 PM

Heirloom
 
My father wants to buy my brother and I each an "heirloom" type firearm that can be passed down to our sons, and one day their sons, etc.... My brother is interested in a pistol, and I told him he couldn't go wrong with a Colt 1911.

I've got a nice inventory of guns, but want to make the right decision. After a lot of thinking and research, I think I've decided on a Ruger Number 1. It is simple, timeless, and a work of art, (not to mention as strong as a brick sh*t house).

As far as what caliber, part of me wants the old 45-70, which is what a lot of these falling block shooting platforms used over a century ago. The other part of me would like it to be a more "shootable" rifle, with less recoil - something that kids can shoot, and possibly take their first deer with, like a 243.

I would love to hear others' opinions.

Thanks!

Z

TLuker 12-21-2013 12:46 PM

I like the Ruger No.1 but I don't think it truly represents single shots? I would be looking at a Winchester 1885 reproduction. The big advantage of the single shot is that it essentially has no action compared to an automatic or bolt action. It is almost all barrel. That lets you get a longer barrel rifle with the overall length of a standard rifle. What action it does have is also extremely simply and accurate. That combined with the longer barrel makes it a great long range rifle, which is what the original single shots were. The 1885 was built for long range precision shooting. The Ruger No1 is a great rifle but I always hated that they didn't take advantage of the design and add a longer barrel.

As for caliber I would get it in a great long range flat shooting caliber. I don't think it's available in the 1885 Winchester repo. but a 6.5 Creedmoor would be ideal? That's a fairly new caliber (named in honor of the Creedmoor matches) and it was also design for long range precision shooting. It would be a perfect match for the rifle that earned its reputation at the Creedmoor matches. If it's not available then any similar cartridge would work great.

That would give you a truly classic rifle with an amazing history that would last you and your kids from now on. It would also give you something really fun to shoot and recoil wouldn't be an issue with something like a 6.5 Creedmoor.

On a trivial side note, the 1885 Winchester was design by John M. Browning and it's what started his legendary career. :)

forrest225 12-24-2013 03:25 AM

I think the no 1 is a great choice. As far as caliber, personally I would go with .45-70. I've fired it out of a marlin, I really didn't think it was bad at all. I think just about anybody could shoot a normal factory load, and I'll bet you could find some cowboy loads that would be lighter.

nitestalker 12-24-2013 05:00 AM

Single shot rifles are classic firearms. The Ruger Number one is designed from the great Farquharson single shot. This was invented in Scotland in 1872. A classic caliber such as a .375 H&H would be timeless.:)

TLuker 12-24-2013 11:19 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by nitestalker (Post 1466036)
Single shot rifles are classic firearms. The Ruger Number one is designed from the great Farquharson single shot. This was invented in Scotland in 1872. A classic caliber such as a .375 H&H would be timeless.:)

Yes, but I'm guessing not very much fun to shoot. :rolleyes:

rockratt 12-24-2013 12:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tzem68 (Post 1463505)
My father wants to buy my brother and I each an "heirloom" type firearm that can be passed down to our sons, and one day their sons, etc.... My brother is interested in a pistol, and I told him he couldn't go wrong with a Colt 1911.

I've got a nice inventory of guns, but want to make the right decision. After a lot of thinking and research, I think I've decided on a Ruger Number 1. It is simple, timeless, and a work of art, (not to mention as strong as a brick sh*t house).

As far as what caliber, part of me wants the old 45-70, which is what a lot of these falling block shooting platforms used over a century ago. The other part of me would like it to be a more "shootable" rifle, with less recoil - something that kids can shoot, and possibly take their first deer with, like a 243.

I would love to hear others' opinions.

Thanks!

Z

I agree nothing says heirloom like a single shot. But a good lever gun is not far behind. I don't have a thing against the Ruger NO 1 either. They are a very fine rifle. But IMHO nothing would say heirloom like a Shiloh Sharps. You could still go with the 45-70 or my choice would probably be the 45-110..:D

Salvo 12-24-2013 12:21 PM

Winchester offers the 1885 with a 24" octagonal barrel in 6.5x55.

That's what I would go for. - Classic through and through.

The Ruger #1 just doesn't measure up to the 1885, no way.

hiwall 12-24-2013 12:23 PM

I totally agree with your choice of the #1 and in a light kicking cartridge. +1

Rick1967 12-24-2013 12:32 PM

I would like a Ruger #1 myself. But I would get one in a more modern cartridge. Maybe a .308 or something like that. I would be concerned about ammo availability in 100 years. I have gotten my son to help me with reloading a little. But who knows latter in life. I would hate for them to sell it because they couldn't get ammo.

nitestalker 12-24-2013 01:22 PM

I would not consider the fake Winchesters marked made in Japan. I own and shoot the copies of Sharps rifles.;) I would go with an American made firearm or a high end European Shot gun. Investing in fine vintage Winchesters made in America before 1963 would be better than investing in gold. Colt handguns are always a winner. :)


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