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Old 04-12-2013, 11:21 PM   #101
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Axxe55 > WOW…I see…This setup shows three screws…the rear screw holding the floor plate and the rear of the receiver…then a countersunk screw hidden under the floor plate holding the receiver near mid-point, and then that slanted receiver front screw hidden under the floor plate as well. Naturally, you know this as you sent me the drawing…I’m just talking out loud here. That sure is an interesting setup that Ruger had for this action. It would seem that front slanted action screw would have done a good job of simultaneously holding the action down and back into the stock. Without knowing any different, I can only guess this setup was too costly to make as the years went on? I don’t know if there are any Ruger Blogs around you can jump on or who you would talk to, like an elder gunsmith, that might have worked on these rifles. But it would sure seem there makeup would provide a solid platform and this help contribute to accuracy.
Don, from what i can determine they used this type of set-up from about 1967-1991? now i know that Ruger used investment casting for many of their rifles and pistols and it looks as if the recoil lug is cast into the bottom of the action at an angle, hence the forward action screw under the hinge at about a 60 degree angle. the curious thing to me, is if this arrangement aided in it's accuracy? i have owned many of these older M77's in various calibers and all were very accurate. thing is, these older Ruger M77's make me look like a better shooter than i am!

as much as i like the Remington M700 action and platform, i happen to like the Ruger M77's much better. problem is that they are few and far between and even when i find one in decent condition, i can usually buy two used M700's for what one M77 costs me.
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Old 04-13-2013, 03:16 PM   #102
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Axxe55 > I sure hope someone else with Ruger experience would jump in here and add input. Would be great axxe55 if we had a gunsmith that had experience with these Rugers.

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Old 04-13-2013, 05:24 PM   #103
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Axxe55 > Found this link... http://www.gunreports.com/special_reports/long_guns/GunReports-Ruger-Model-77-repairs-improvements-schematics-American-Gunsmith1781-1.html
Just some info pasted from link above...
Another major problem with accuracy is how the stock fits the barreled action. There is much debate about Ruger’s front stock screw being set at an angle. The thought here is that the bolt being put in at an angle will not only hold the action in the stock tightly, but will also pull it back into the stock very firmly at the same time. This double pressure contact should make it a better fit, and therefore produce a more accurate rifle. This dual-purpose screw does make it very important to always have the same pressure applied as it is tightened if you expect to get accuracy from this rifle.

When placing the action back into the stock, do the following: First, tighten all three stock screws down until there is no play but they are not tight. Next, tighten the front screw until it is very snug but not completely tight. Then tighten the other screws—but not as tightly as the front screw. Tighten the front angle screw to between 10 to 18 pounds of torque. Finally, you can finish tightening the two rear stock screws. All rifle stocks need to be properly fitted and tightened, but Ruger’s angle mount seems to require more perfection than others. And then again, some Ruger rifles seem to shoot well whatever people do to them, while some are very finicky.

If the Ruger you are working on fails to keep its point of impact the same with each shot—and the problem is not with the shooter or the ammunition—glass bedding is what most gunsmiths turn to. Many good articles have been written about glass bedding, and I will not go into it here except to point out a couple of things that are different about bedding the Ruger. Remember this angle-mount stock bolt pulls the action slightly to the rear as it tightens. This means that if you are using a firm gel fiberglass, it will pull the action away from the bedding compound, not just down into it. This unique movement has also locked some Rugers into a glass-bedded stock, never to be removed again. A second caution concerning fiberglassing the Ruger stock: Never get any fiberglass in the area of the safety link, because the wood fit must remain right for the safety to work properly.

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Old 04-13-2013, 05:35 PM   #104
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Axxe55 > Found this link... http://www.gunreports.com/special_reports/long_guns/GunReports-Ruger-Model-77-repairs-improvements-schematics-American-Gunsmith1781-1.html
Just some info pasted from link above...
Another major problem with accuracy is how the stock fits the barreled action. There is much debate about Ruger’s front stock screw being set at an angle. The thought here is that the bolt being put in at an angle will not only hold the action in the stock tightly, but will also pull it back into the stock very firmly at the same time. This double pressure contact should make it a better fit, and therefore produce a more accurate rifle. This dual-purpose screw does make it very important to always have the same pressure applied as it is tightened if you expect to get accuracy from this rifle.

When placing the action back into the stock, do the following: First, tighten all three stock screws down until there is no play but they are not tight. Next, tighten the front screw until it is very snug but not completely tight. Then tighten the other screws—but not as tightly as the front screw. Tighten the front angle screw to between 10 to 18 pounds of torque. Finally, you can finish tightening the two rear stock screws. All rifle stocks need to be properly fitted and tightened, but Ruger’s angle mount seems to require more perfection than others. And then again, some Ruger rifles seem to shoot well whatever people do to them, while some are very finicky.

If the Ruger you are working on fails to keep its point of impact the same with each shot—and the problem is not with the shooter or the ammunition—glass bedding is what most gunsmiths turn to. Many good articles have been written about glass bedding, and I will not go into it here except to point out a couple of things that are different about bedding the Ruger. Remember this angle-mount stock bolt pulls the action slightly to the rear as it tightens. This means that if you are using a firm gel fiberglass, it will pull the action away from the bedding compound, not just down into it. This unique movement has also locked some Rugers into a glass-bedded stock, never to be removed again. A second caution concerning fiberglassing the Ruger stock: Never get any fiberglass in the area of the safety link, because the wood fit must remain right for the safety to work properly.
Don, thank you for that information. very helpful. i had given some thought into glass bedding the stock, and it appears that doing the Ruger M77's is a bit more difficult because of the angled stock screw.

never knew there was certain procedure to tightening the stock screws! i think i might redo mine this afternoon as suggested by your procedure. i'll try and take some close-up pictures of the action for you to look at.
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Old 10-22-2013, 06:54 PM   #105
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Ruger still uses the angled front guard screw which is a patented feature of their action. I have always sort of liked the feature. Many dislike it because it complicates bedding but I have never found it objectionable.
I have always prefered actions which had bedding surface ahead of the screw as well as behind. In general, I prefer to have the front screw behind the recoil lug.
I built one target rifle on a ruger 77 action about thirty five years ago. It shot very well.
Re. the new Model 70's,
I have rebarreled just a few of these and consider them to be a pretty nice action. The only flaw I have seen was an error in machining the extractor groove in the bolt (too close to the bolt face). If thay address this problem, the action will be very good. If they don't, the action requires remedial work. The super grade actions are poorly polished to the extent that I feel they have damaged a perfectly good receiver to give it a shiny finish. GD

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Old 10-22-2013, 07:04 PM   #106
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Which Factory Rifle Action is "Best"?

I'll stick with the Mauser 98'. Afterall, 15 years of a track record with no significant improvements is good enuff for me.

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Old 10-22-2013, 07:16 PM   #107
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I agree with Anna....surprise.....my CZ is a 98 action. It is the best I have ever owned. Why change perfection?

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Old 10-22-2013, 07:20 PM   #108
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Sako.........

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Old 10-22-2013, 07:27 PM   #109
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Old 10-22-2013, 07:47 PM   #110
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While there are several rifle actions I love, namely the Mauser actions, but the perfection of the mass produced rifle action is the Savage and here is why.
1: Floating bolt head, this creates the perfect fit between recoil lugs and action that otherwise would require very expensive precision machining.
2: Barrel nut design, this creates perfect head spacing that also would otherwise require pricy precision milling that nobody would do on a production rifle. This also makes the Savage action the most customizable of any because any average Joe who can turn a barrel nut wrench can achieve as perfect a headspaceing as any custom gunsmith.
3: Accustock, yes I know that is not technically part of the action but it keeps Savage from having to mill a flat bottom receiver (very expensive) in order to achieve a perfect bedding of the action.
4: Free floated by design, hard to believe but some companies still build rifles with a pressure point, while some of them are still shooters the most accurate guns around shot after shot don't have the barrel contacting the stock, Savage was a pioneer in this.
So long story short while indeed the Savage action won't do anything a perfectly machined Model 70 action won't it can perform every bit as well with much less machining and hence at a much lower cost.
If you notice nearly all affordable new rifle designs are to a great extent a knockoff of a Savage 110, namely the Ruger American, Remington 783, Mossberg ATR, Marlin X7.....etc.

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