Which Factory Rifle Action is "Best"? - Page 10
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Old 04-01-2013, 03:01 AM   #91
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BornToHunt…why do you say TIKKA HANDS DOWN. (Made by beretta) ?
I don’t know if Tikka runs the front action retaining screw into the recoil lug like the Howa or behind the recoil lug like the Winchester Model 70. I couldn’t find a pic of it…everyone usually talks about the guts of the action and not the external mounting surfaces. Greydog’s past response hit the nail on the head for what I was looking for regarding this, but Tikka isn’t one of the actions he lists. Can you advise please? Presently, I’m thinking of buying a Winchester Model 70, and to get started using it for hunting and target shooting to include reloading, and then potentially later down the road, upgrade to a custom barrel while truing the action as best possible at that time. My concern, which again Greydog recognized, is that when I would go to pillar and bed upgrade my action, is if I had an action that the recoil lug was also the front action retaining screw placeholder. I would like to stick with the integral lug and flat-bottom action, and so far, only see that the Winchester Model 70 offers the retaining screw behind the recoil lug….THANKS
Well he listed sako which is the big brother to the tikka. They are related both made by beretta. Tikka has a 2 lug bolt and sako has a 3 lug. I'm just saying, the tikka has the smoothest bolt my hands have ever touched. You could load and unload the thing with a pinkie Not including the 2.5 lb factory set trigger. It's such a crisp smooth rifle that in my opinion is easily the best in its class(price)
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Old 04-01-2013, 03:35 AM   #92
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Well he listed sako which is the big brother to the tikka. They are related both made by beretta. Tikka has a 2 lug bolt and sako has a 3 lug. I'm just saying, the tikka has the smoothest bolt my hands have ever touched. You could load and unload the thing with a pinkie Not including the 2.5 lb factory set trigger. It's such a crisp smooth rifle that in my opinion is easily the best in its class(price)
just for the record, how does the smoothness of the bolt relate to accuracy?

how many rifles have you owned in your short years?
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Old 04-01-2013, 03:43 AM   #93
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just for the record, how does the smoothness of the bolt relate to accuracy?

how many rifles have you owned in your short years?
Sorry I didn't throw that in there
Tikkas are freaking scary accurate out of the box. I'm talkin quarter inch groups at a hundred, and smaller. People are amazed and almost freaked out that they shoot that good. A guy on another forum complained because it was "too accurate"
Free floatin, cold hammer forged first grade steel barrels are used on tikka s and continue to surprise their customers.
Well RIFLES I have owned 7 different calibered rifles but have handled several more
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Old 04-08-2013, 06:02 PM   #94
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well my model 700 in 308 win does pretty good can't say i am the best shooter but i am a good shooter. I went to my local range and shot this target at 100 yards using my Remington model 700 in 308 win. has a bsa scope. i used my own reloaded ammo 150 grain hornady fmj 41.5 grains of imr 4895. It was about 67 degrees and about 10-15 mph winds. Wanted to zero my rifle and only had to use three shots. Well i can't say its all natural talent but good fundamental i learned as a Marine. I was once a pig but then i became a hog! Semper Fi !

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Old 04-09-2013, 12:35 PM   #95
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That's beautiful! When I saw the target, I wondered about the perfect verticle but there was the slight horiontal stringing,but your explination straightened me out there.
The only problem I've heard about with Tikkas was several years ago; they had a serious problem with ss barrels and - if I remember, there was a rumor they had purchased some surplus ss from Russian military stores and it was substandard.
I'm impressed with both the shooter and rifle

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Old 04-09-2013, 04:31 PM   #96
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Regards my thread on Feb. 8, 2013 > “Using the Winchester Model 70 (new FN S. Carolina) action and the Howa/Vanguard type action for comparison, how does the front action retaining screw location relate to inherent accuracies? The Winchester Model 70 has its front action screw behind the integral recoil lug, and so this recoil lug can be readily bedded all by itself, and the action can be pillar bedded separately at the retaining screw. Looking online at a Howa 1500 action, the integral recoil lug also holds the front action retaining screw placement…etc.”
So what does my question I raised 0n 2/8/13 have anything to do with how slick someone’s Tikka action is or how well someone shoots their Remington 700? I see that axxe55 tried to tame BornToHunt down and it’s evident that this led to ANAKINANAYA’s reply.
Thank goodness that my very first post to this forum was answered by greydog > see his post following mine from Feb. 14. I appreciate that some folks have rifles they like, and shoot very well, but it has nothing to do with my question. Again, please check greydog’s reply on 2/14/13 and hopefully that gives you the idea of where I wanted to go with my question?
Greydog > If you are still out there, I stopped by a gunshop called Accuflite, and the guy there deals with SAKO actions and makes custom rifles from them. For the SAKO Model 85, he was throwing away the recoil plate unit and used the small front threaded action lug for the recoil and front retaining screw. His Kevlar replacement stocks had a small cutout matching the front action’s threaded lug, and it was drawn down tight onto a steel molded-in flat pillar. So he was kinda following what you say by bedding the bottom of the lug, but it wasn’t bedding material like Devcon. Instead, it was a solid steel molded in unit. He told me two things…one was that his stock dimensions were perfect in fit and alignment for the SAKO 85 action and two was that the action screwed tight to the molded “steel” pillars, with saying he used steel versus aluminum because the steel was more stable and moved less with temperature changes.
I’m looking for any follow up thoughts you may have, if any, but presently I’m thinking Winchester Model 70 new style of action. Hopefully others don’t pour in with how slick one action is over the other when we are talking about bedding a front action lug that also includes the front action retaining screw…my fingers are crossed 

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Old 04-09-2013, 04:41 PM   #97
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Regards my thread on Feb. 8, 2013 > “Using the Winchester Model 70 (new FN S. Carolina) action and the Howa/Vanguard type action for comparison, how does the front action retaining screw location relate to inherent accuracies? The Winchester Model 70 has its front action screw behind the integral recoil lug, and so this recoil lug can be readily bedded all by itself, and the action can be pillar bedded separately at the retaining screw. Looking online at a Howa 1500 action, the integral recoil lug also holds the front action retaining screw placement…etc.”
So what does my question I raised 0n 2/8/13 have anything to do with how slick someone’s Tikka action is or how well someone shoots their Remington 700? I see that axxe55 tried to tame BornToHunt down and it’s evident that this led to ANAKINANAYA’s reply.
Thank goodness that my very first post to this forum was answered by greydog > see his post following mine from Feb. 14. I appreciate that some folks have rifles they like, and shoot very well, but it has nothing to do with my question. Again, please check greydog’s reply on 2/14/13 and hopefully that gives you the idea of where I wanted to go with my question?
Greydog > If you are still out there, I stopped by a gunshop called Accuflite, and the guy there deals with SAKO actions and makes custom rifles from them. For the SAKO Model 85, he was throwing away the recoil plate unit and used the small front threaded action lug for the recoil and front retaining screw. His Kevlar replacement stocks had a small cutout matching the front action’s threaded lug, and it was drawn down tight onto a steel molded-in flat pillar. So he was kinda following what you say by bedding the bottom of the lug, but it wasn’t bedding material like Devcon. Instead, it was a solid steel molded in unit. He told me two things…one was that his stock dimensions were perfect in fit and alignment for the SAKO 85 action and two was that the action screwed tight to the molded “steel” pillars, with saying he used steel versus aluminum because the steel was more stable and moved less with temperature changes.
I’m looking for any follow up thoughts you may have, if any, but presently I’m thinking Winchester Model 70 new style of action. Hopefully others don’t pour in with how slick one action is over the other when we are talking about bedding a front action lug that also includes the front action retaining screw…my fingers are crossed 
Don75, a curious question here on my part. i am and have been a huge fan of the older Ruger M77's and have gotten exceptional accuracy out of all of them. my current M77V in 280 Remington is very, very accurate. (made in 1978) but the question is this, how is it that the older Ruger M77's used an angled screw into the action and how did it play into making the rifle more accurate? whereas most use bolts or screws that are 90 degrees to the action, with the Ruger being closer to about 60 degrees.
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Old 04-10-2013, 12:45 PM   #98
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Great question axxe55, and sure adds to my curiosity as well...thanks for sticking with the subject at hand too My hunting buddy had an about same vintage Ruger you had (sadly sold it during a divorce) in 270 caliber that was a very accurate rifle right out of the box. But way back at that time we were not into the mechanics/makeup of rifles...just shooting and hunting, so I don't even remember what the physical setup was with his action. So we are talking about what, if any, inherent accuracies a flat bottom action has with > 1...front action retaining screw behind the recoil lug > 2...front action retaining screw into the recoi lug > front action retaining screw angled (axxe55...perhaps give a little more description please...was this screw angled into the recoil lug or what?) Perhaps someone with gunsmith experience will jump on and give us soem input?

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Old 04-10-2013, 11:34 PM   #99
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Great question axxe55, and sure adds to my curiosity as well...thanks for sticking with the subject at hand too My hunting buddy had an about same vintage Ruger you had (sadly sold it during a divorce) in 270 caliber that was a very accurate rifle right out of the box. But way back at that time we were not into the mechanics/makeup of rifles...just shooting and hunting, so I don't even remember what the physical setup was with his action. So we are talking about what, if any, inherent accuracies a flat bottom action has with > 1...front action retaining screw behind the recoil lug > 2...front action retaining screw into the recoi lug > front action retaining screw angled (axxe55...perhaps give a little more description please...was this screw angled into the recoil lug or what?) Perhaps someone with gunsmith experience will jump on and give us soem input?
here is an exploded view and a sideview of the Ruger M77 action. if you notice the forward stock screw is just under the hinged area of the drop-out magazine floorplate. best i can determine they started doing this in 1967 maybe? now the older tang mounted safety M77's are very close in design to the Mauser actions. but, IIRC were not the Mausers stock screws into the action at 90 degrees to it?
File Type: pdf 200952211454-evrugerm77.pdf (226.1 KB, 72 views)
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:53 PM   #100
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Axxe55 > WOW…I see…This setup shows three screws…the rear screw holding the floor plate and the rear of the receiver…then a countersunk screw hidden under the floor plate holding the receiver near mid-point, and then that slanted receiver front screw hidden under the floor plate as well. Naturally, you know this as you sent me the drawing…I’m just talking out loud here. That sure is an interesting setup that Ruger had for this action. It would seem that front slanted action screw would have done a good job of simultaneously holding the action down and back into the stock. Without knowing any different, I can only guess this setup was too costly to make as the years went on? I don’t know if there are any Ruger Blogs around you can jump on or who you would talk to, like an elder gunsmith, that might have worked on these rifles. But it would sure seem there makeup would provide a solid platform and this help contribute to accuracy.

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