Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Long Guns > General Rifle Discussion > Dry Firing

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 09-17-2012, 08:00 AM   #1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Winston,OR
Posts: 229
Liked 41 Times on 20 Posts

Default Dry Firing

So I read recently that one of the best tips pro shooters can give is to dry fire your rifle to get the muscle memory do you aren't jerking or twitching and you get a consistent trigger pull. I want to start doing this so that I have the perfect trigger pull for hunting season. They suggested using snap caps to protect your firing pin (the debate of wether snap caps are needed or not is a different subject entirely) My question is can I just stick a used brass in the chamber so that the firing pin has something to hit against and absorb some energy (like a snap cap does) or would that not work/cause problems?

__________________
rferguson61 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today - It's Free!

Are you a firearms enthusiast? Then we hope you will join the community. You will gain access to post, create threads, private message, upload images, join groups and more.

Firearms Talk is owned and operated by fellow firearms enthusiasts. We strive to offer a non-commercial community to learn and share information.

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today! - Click Here


Old 09-17-2012, 08:15 AM   #2
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
bearrwe's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 599
Liked 53 Times on 46 Posts
Likes Given: 11

Default

As a gunsmith I quite often use used brass when dry firing a gun that I don't have a snap cap on hand for. You just need to change it out after a few shots as the snap caps are spring loaded for repetitive use.

__________________

Keep up with the trends, avoid the fads, take your time and do work you can be proud of always

bearrwe is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 08:25 AM   #3
Resident Lurker
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
sputnik1988's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Location: The Bluegrass state
Posts: 2,813
Liked 671 Times on 438 Posts
Likes Given: 1819

Default

No need for centerfire firearms, dry firing causes less wear than actually shooting. The firing pin doesn't touch anything.

__________________
Life is hard; it's harder if you're stupid. - John Wayne

ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

Member - NRA, NAGR
sputnik1988 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 09:05 AM   #4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Winston,OR
Posts: 229
Liked 41 Times on 20 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bearrwe
As a gunsmith I quite often use used brass when dry firing a gun that I don't have a snap cap on hand for. You just need to change it out after a few shots as the snap caps are spring loaded for repetitive use.
Thanks! I should have enough spent cases to last until I can get snap caps.
__________________
rferguson61 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 09:14 AM   #5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: \
Posts: 990
Liked 133 Times on 108 Posts
Likes Given: 43

Default

It doesn't hurt to dry fire most modern centerfire rifles. I would not dry fire rimfire rifles. Consult your owners manual to makes sure. Ruger states in their owners manual you should dry fire their rifles to become accustomed to the rifle or SA revolver.

__________________
Old_Crow is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 10:08 AM   #6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Oct 2011
Location: Winston,OR
Posts: 229
Liked 41 Times on 20 Posts

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Old_Crow
It doesn't hurt to dry fire most modern centerfire rifles. I would not dry fire rimfire rifles. Consult your owners manual to makes sure. Ruger states in their owners manual you should dry fire their rifles to become accustomed to the rifle or SA revolver.
True, but first, my rifle is quite old and I bight it used, so there's no owners manual. Also, sure you could probably dry fire a rifle thousands of times with no problem, but that four thousand and first time...your firing pin comes flying out the barrel (happened to a friends gun while I was sitting there) I don't see why not use a tool that was designed to prevent the extra wear of dry firing. Id rather have something, anything, in the chamber to help disperse energy from the pin.
__________________
rferguson61 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 10:46 AM   #7
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 804
Liked 26 Times on 22 Posts
Likes Given: 67

Default

Buy a BB gun and practice with that, worked for me.

__________________
Ranger-6 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-17-2012, 11:00 AM   #8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: \
Posts: 990
Liked 133 Times on 108 Posts
Likes Given: 43

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rferguson61 View Post
True, but first, my rifle is quite old and I bight it used, so there's no owners manual. Also, sure you could probably dry fire a rifle thousands of times with no problem, but that four thousand and first time...your firing pin comes flying out the barrel (happened to a friends gun while I was sitting there) I don't see why not use a tool that was designed to prevent the extra wear of dry firing. Id rather have something, anything, in the chamber to help disperse energy from the pin.
Your friends rifle was likely in the same shape as a Mossberg shotgun I used to shoot skeet with. The firing pin block had severe wear. I brought the shotgun into a gunsmith and asked how much to repair it? He grabbed a new Mossberg off the shelf and laid it on the counter.
__________________
Old_Crow is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2012, 01:39 AM   #9
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 3,617
Liked 812 Times on 621 Posts
Likes Given: 125

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by rferguson61 View Post
True, but first, my rifle is quite old and I bight it used, so there's no owners manual. Also, sure you could probably dry fire a rifle thousands of times with no problem, but that four thousand and first time...your firing pin comes flying out the barrel (happened to a friends gun while I was sitting there) I don't see why not use a tool that was designed to prevent the extra wear of dry firing. Id rather have something, anything, in the chamber to help disperse energy from the pin.
+1
The folks who say dry firing causes no damage (in a centerfire) are correct -- if you only do it a couple of times. Probably. The peoploe who say to do it often as practice were taught by non-com military instructors who never learned physics and are using their uncle's property as they were taught by THEIR non-coms.

All that energy has to go somewhere. Dry-firing is shocking the hammer, firing pin, and other parts as well as compressing the firing pin spring as much as possible and then some. Don't do it. A snap cap with counter-acting spring absorbs some pressure and turns it into heat.
__________________

Last edited by HockaLouis; 09-18-2012 at 01:41 AM.
HockaLouis is offline  
The_Kid Likes This 
Reply With Quote
Old 09-18-2012, 01:52 AM   #10
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
locutus's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2011
Location: Wyoming
Posts: 8,367
Liked 4722 Times on 2695 Posts
Likes Given: 3746

Default

And target competitors will dry fire without snap caps a hundred times or more for every round of live fire.

It absolutely will not harm modern centerfire weapons. Ask the manufacturers or military/LE instructors who know far more about the subject than "internet experts."

__________________
locutus is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
First firing BeyondTheBox General Handgun Discussion 9 11-18-2011 08:58 PM
Firing Pin HChevy66 General Rifle Discussion 1 08-26-2011 08:49 AM
Dry firing S&W 638 Jax Revolver Handguns 2 03-08-2010 10:46 PM
CZ-52 firing pin Benning Boy Curio & Relic Discussion 15 06-09-2009 03:26 AM
Dry Firing dyoll 1911 Forum 6 01-10-2009 03:47 PM