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-   -   Dry Firing (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f18/dry-firing-72590/)

rferguson61 09-17-2012 08:00 AM

Dry Firing
 
So I read recently that one of the best tips pro shooters can give is to dry fire your rifle to get the muscle memory do you aren't jerking or twitching and you get a consistent trigger pull. I want to start doing this so that I have the perfect trigger pull for hunting season. They suggested using snap caps to protect your firing pin (the debate of wether snap caps are needed or not is a different subject entirely) My question is can I just stick a used brass in the chamber so that the firing pin has something to hit against and absorb some energy (like a snap cap does) or would that not work/cause problems?

bearrwe 09-17-2012 08:15 AM

As a gunsmith I quite often use used brass when dry firing a gun that I don't have a snap cap on hand for. You just need to change it out after a few shots as the snap caps are spring loaded for repetitive use.

sputnik1988 09-17-2012 08:25 AM

No need for centerfire firearms, dry firing causes less wear than actually shooting. The firing pin doesn't touch anything.

rferguson61 09-17-2012 09:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bearrwe
As a gunsmith I quite often use used brass when dry firing a gun that I don't have a snap cap on hand for. You just need to change it out after a few shots as the snap caps are spring loaded for repetitive use.

Thanks! I should have enough spent cases to last until I can get snap caps.

Old_Crow 09-17-2012 09:14 AM

It doesn't hurt to dry fire most modern centerfire rifles. I would not dry fire rimfire rifles. Consult your owners manual to makes sure. Ruger states in their owners manual you should dry fire their rifles to become accustomed to the rifle or SA revolver.

rferguson61 09-17-2012 10:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Old_Crow
It doesn't hurt to dry fire most modern centerfire rifles. I would not dry fire rimfire rifles. Consult your owners manual to makes sure. Ruger states in their owners manual you should dry fire their rifles to become accustomed to the rifle or SA revolver.

True, but first, my rifle is quite old and I bight it used, so there's no owners manual. Also, sure you could probably dry fire a rifle thousands of times with no problem, but that four thousand and first time...your firing pin comes flying out the barrel (happened to a friends gun while I was sitting there) I don't see why not use a tool that was designed to prevent the extra wear of dry firing. Id rather have something, anything, in the chamber to help disperse energy from the pin.

Ranger-6 09-17-2012 10:46 AM

Buy a BB gun and practice with that, worked for me.

Old_Crow 09-17-2012 11:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rferguson61 (Post 944138)
True, but first, my rifle is quite old and I bight it used, so there's no owners manual. Also, sure you could probably dry fire a rifle thousands of times with no problem, but that four thousand and first time...your firing pin comes flying out the barrel (happened to a friends gun while I was sitting there) I don't see why not use a tool that was designed to prevent the extra wear of dry firing. Id rather have something, anything, in the chamber to help disperse energy from the pin.

Your friends rifle was likely in the same shape as a Mossberg shotgun I used to shoot skeet with. The firing pin block had severe wear. I brought the shotgun into a gunsmith and asked how much to repair it? He grabbed a new Mossberg off the shelf and laid it on the counter.

HockaLouis 09-18-2012 01:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rferguson61 (Post 944138)
True, but first, my rifle is quite old and I bight it used, so there's no owners manual. Also, sure you could probably dry fire a rifle thousands of times with no problem, but that four thousand and first time...your firing pin comes flying out the barrel (happened to a friends gun while I was sitting there) I don't see why not use a tool that was designed to prevent the extra wear of dry firing. Id rather have something, anything, in the chamber to help disperse energy from the pin.

+1
The folks who say dry firing causes no damage (in a centerfire) are correct -- if you only do it a couple of times. Probably. The peoploe who say to do it often as practice were taught by non-com military instructors who never learned physics and are using their uncle's property as they were taught by THEIR non-coms.

All that energy has to go somewhere. Dry-firing is shocking the hammer, firing pin, and other parts as well as compressing the firing pin spring as much as possible and then some. Don't do it. A snap cap with counter-acting spring absorbs some pressure and turns it into heat.

locutus 09-18-2012 01:52 AM

And target competitors will dry fire without snap caps a hundred times or more for every round of live fire.

It absolutely will not harm modern centerfire weapons. Ask the manufacturers or military/LE instructors who know far more about the subject than "internet experts."


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