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-   -   Carbon steel barrels. (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f18/carbon-steel-barrels-86868/)

Zamzow 03-18-2013 10:04 PM

Carbon steel barrels.
 
So I have heard that carbon steel barrels rust easier and faster the steel barrels. Not very knowledgable with this so input would be nice.

hardluk1 03-18-2013 11:00 PM

Take reasonable care of any and it will last a life time with out rusting. Stainless Steel barrels and actions have carbon in them too and will also rust. Use something like a cpl when new and mainan it and you will be fine. My oldest hunting rifle I bought in 1976 , blued steel . It been used for hunting in rain, snow been soaked and still no rust.

Zamzow 03-18-2013 11:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hardluk1
Take reasonable care of any and it will last a life time with out rusting. Stainless Steel barrels and actions have carbon in them too and will also rust. Use something like a cpl when new and mainan it and you will be fine. My oldest hunting rifle I bought in 1976 , blued steel . It been used for hunting in rain, snow been soaked and still no rust.

Ok. So it's just as easy to rust as stainless if its not cleaned and neglected. My guns r cleaned every time they r shot and every couple months if they r not shot.

jpattersonnh 03-18-2013 11:35 PM

Carbon is what turns iron into steel. All steel has carbon. :rolleyes:

Zamzow 03-19-2013 12:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jpattersonnh
Carbon is what turns iron into steel. All steel has carbon. :rolleyes:

I understand that and know that. So why do they call them carbon steel barrels? Is there more carbon in the steel.

SSGN_Doc 03-19-2013 01:24 AM

The carbon steel barrels have more carbon, and lack the nickel that is in stainless steel barrels, or at least the percentage.

The iron in a non-stailess steel barrel may be more prone to rust quickly. As others have said, it is not really a problem if care is taken to dry a barrel and oil it when cleaning it and storing it.

Stainless steel can be a bit softer than high carbon steel barrels, and the bore may wear a bit faster in a high volume fired firearm. Match shooters may run 10,000 rounds and change a barrel when they see groups start to open up a bit and no longer shrink after doing some some good copper removal treatment to the bore. But I'm told that it is easer to get a more uniform bore and rifling in stainless steel barrels, and that that is the reason for using them on match rifles.

Machine guns have carbon steel barrels because of the high volume that they are subjected to, and they do not require the same level of precision, that a match barrel does.

I don't make barrels, but this is how it was explained to me, so, take it for what it is worth. Someone else may come along who actually knows more about the machining, stessing, and stress-relieving of the different materials when the bore and rifling are done, as well as other machining properties of the different materials.

c3shooter 03-19-2013 02:22 AM

Steel is an alloy of iron and carbon, usually with other materials. Steel may be referred to as carbon steel to distinguish it from stainless steel.

Stainless steel is an alloy of iron, carbon, chromium and nickel. There are varying grades of stainless, depending on the mix. Stainless steel is NOT stainless, but is rust RESISTANT due to nickel/ chrome content.

Machine gun barrels (such as the M60) were made of carbon steel lined with another material, Stellite. THAT is an incredibly hard, heat resistant form of steel with cobalt, chrome, nickel, iron, carbon, and other things.

The blued firearms you see are made of "carbon" steel. Have been for about 400 years or so.

nitestalker 03-19-2013 02:48 AM

The popular carbon barrel steel is 4140 Chrome Moly. This has a Rockwell C test of 28-30 for hardness. 4140 Chrome Moly is used for tie rods, bike frames, high pressure gas lines etc.
Stainless is easier to machine allowing in higher production and lower cost. Reducing barrel manufacturing cost can make a big difference in profits. Marlin was about to go under when they came up with Micro-Groove rifling. This lowered their cost enough to stay in business. Most of these choices are a balance of quality and profits.:)

Zamzow 03-19-2013 05:33 AM

All this info is awesome. Thanks guys very much for this. I love to learn as much as I can about guns. It seems that the carbon barrels r better then the stainless steel barrels but yet the stainless steel barrel rifles tend to be more expensive then the blued barrels. Why is that?

hardluk1 03-19-2013 12:26 PM

And if you pay attention to what most match barrels are made of there SS currently. For a typical hunters use or weekend plinker it more about the cartidge used as to how fast it will burn out the barrels throat and small amounts of general wear than the barrels material choice. . Like with a 220 swift compaired to a 223 .

I have a old blued steel 788 rem in 308 thats still a moa barrel 36 years later and a krieger ss match great on a hunter thats a sub 1/2moa 16 years later. They visit the range but are hunting rifles and do not bang away with them. Yet a match shooter may charge barrels once or twice a year. I don't see a price difference in barrels if you stay with in a brand and the same quality and profile they tend to the same price.

There are some light lubes that will over time soak into the surface of metals. Synthetics lubes tend to do this along with a few cleaner/lube products like Pro-Shots One-Choice and Breakfree CLP , just for 2 brands.


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