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Old 09-15-2013, 04:49 PM   #321
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Originally Posted by samnev View Post
Thanks for the compliments guys.
The 308 SIG TRG 22 is about 7 years old and has a NightForce NXS 8-32X50 scope with a NP-R1 reticle and Sako bipod. No ZS or HST. They weren't available at the NXS time. I can shoot 0.3moa groups with it and sometime close to 0.25 moa.

The 308 AIAW folder is about a year old and has a NightForce NXS 8-32X56 scope with a MOAR reticle ZS and HST mounted in a AI 20 moa mount an Atlas bipod and a Tab Gera sling. It shoots very close to 0.25 moa groups most of the time. Those that are not usually have 4 shots under 0.25 moa with 1 shot opening the group up to 0,30 moa.
The load I use in both rifle after much experimentation with power and projos is 38 grains of IMR 4895 in Lapau brass with 168 rain SMK's.
As I get older I just do not shoot as well as I use to. I am sure if i was 20 years younger my groups would be more consistent than they are now.
thank you again for sharing and providing some details.

very accurate rifles!
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Old 09-15-2013, 08:10 PM   #322
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Here's some closer pics of the Chinese Mosin build:

I want to paint the bolt when I get it together but I'm not sure how well it will hold up

image-3410068269.jpg   image-2253511354.jpg   image-3757505817.jpg   image-2385066063.jpg  
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Old 09-16-2013, 03:13 AM   #323
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Longunner,You probably know I absolutely hate Mosin's,but you actually made one look half way decent.

Good Job!

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Old 09-16-2013, 03:31 AM   #324
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Thanks for all the compliments guys I can't wait till its done

Hell, if I can make someone who hates Mosins think mine looks good it has to be well done right?

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Old 09-16-2013, 04:25 AM   #325
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Here's my mosin
forumrunner_20130915_232422.jpg

And this was the kit I was going to get

1042857_01_cbrps_bullpup_mosin_nagant_91__640-2-1.jpg

forumrunner_20130915_232441.jpg  
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Old 09-26-2013, 07:48 PM   #326
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the basis for most of the accuracy of a bolt action rifle is the barrel. a strong action that is true to the barrel also aids in accuracy as well. bolt actions by their design and simplicity are one of the things that make them inherently accurate. simple is good many times.

glass bedding and pillar bedding are methods that can increase the accuracy of a rifle, by mating the stock and action into one cohesive unit. some of the new aftermarket stocks now use a bedding block or plate made directly into the stock, that only requires a person to properly torque the actions screws and usually doesn't need any glassbedding to gain optimum accuracy from that stock.

another key component in accuracy are the sights or bases and rings. you can't hit what you can't see. quality sights, or the bases and rings if using a a scope are a must. they must mount the scope securely, but not damage it when doing so. quality rings and bases are required for this.

scope selection is getting to be a must these days, as many bolt actions are coming from the factory, sans open sights. not putting open sights on rifles from the factory saves them manufactering costs when making that rifle. just like a matte finish is cheaper to make than a polished blued finish. my suggestion, buy the best scope that you can afford. the better the quality of the lenses, the higher the price of the scope usually. usually the harder the recoil of the rifle also dictates using a higher quality scope as well. recoil can damage reticles. many people shooting hard hitting magnums or rifles with massive recoil will also use fixed power scopes, because they have less moving parts to fail under massive recoil. hunting rifles as a general rule, don't need high magnification scopes and are more a liabilty than an advantage for hunting. they limit the field of view and make it harder to find the intended target. the large magnification scopes are more suited to target shooting or varmint hunting, where the target is more or less stationary and not moving about. a target shooter rifle needs a much higher quality scope when stepping out to longer distances. higher quality lenses are needed so the optics are clear and not distorted. the longer the distances, the more money needs to be spent on better optics. good optics cost money. better optics cost much more.

wood or synthetic? simple. comes down to personal preference. i like both, along with the laminated stocks. IMO, the laminated stocks offer the best of both worlds, the beauty of wood, with the durability of synthetic. and now days, there are many, many choices in laminates, from mild to wild in grain, patterns and colors. finely figured walnut is always nice too. with some nice checkering, an ebony fore-end tip a nice metal grip cap and beautiful recoil pad, a nice looking leather sling, with highly polished blued finish. nothing says quality rifle like those features. wood has been a staple of gun stocks for many, many years and i think for many more years to come. synthetics have seen a rise over the last couple of decades and have found a place. they are much cheaper to make, they hold up well in any environment and we don't get our feeling hurt if they get scratched or dented like we do on nice wood stock.

weight of a rifle. good thing to remember here is, weight is your friend when it comes to recoil. the more weight, the less felt recoil for that rifle. but, weight can cause problems and there sometimes has to be a trade-off, when it comes to weight. if walking and stalking or tracking game while hunting, a heavy rifle can or will tire you out carrying it all day long, especially up and down hills or mountains. stationary hunting or target shooting doesn't have the same weight concerns. a heavier rifle can be used and will soak up more recoil, allowing a person to shoot more rounds per day, because the recoil is not battering you as bad. weight doesn't change the amount of recoil a cartridge produces. it just makes it feel like less. this the felt recoil. a 30-06 with a 165 gr bullet will produce the same amount of recoil in a six pound rifle, as it does in a ten pound rifle, but it will feel like less recoil in the heavier rifle. stock design and material also have an effect on felt recoil as well. as a general rule, wood stocks are denser, so they soak up more recoil and have less felt recoil than synthetic stocks. this is only a general rule and there are exceptions to this rule.

we get lots of questions about used rifles. there are lots and lots of good deals to be had when buying used, if you know what to look for. i have picked up some great deals on used bolt actions. look for a good bore. the bore is probably the most important feature when shopping for a used rifle IMO. bright and sharp rifling are important. if you are are only looking to buy for the action, and are going to get it rebarreled, then this isn't a needed thing to worry about and skip over it. what shape is the stock in? not a huge issue for me, if i can get the rifle at a good price then order a replacement stock for it. i have done this several times in the past as well. trigger not quite to the liking? most rifles can be fitted with an aftermarket trigger very easily. many of them are not cheap, but well worth the money IMO. a good trigger is important to safety as well as accuracy and can make a world of difference. now the actual part of laying money down. what is the asking price and it's condition? this is important. the condition should reflect the price accordingly. if not sure about the price and if it's a good deal or not, the time to find out, is before you buy, not afterwards. ask around or check out what similiar rifles are selling for on GunBroker or other gun auction sites. the selling prices, not the asking prices. another point in favor of buying used, is that sometimes you can dicker on the price and get a good deal.

well more to come later!

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Old 09-26-2013, 08:38 PM   #327
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Originally Posted by Axxe55 View Post
the basis for most of the accuracy of a bolt action rifle is the barrel. a strong action that is true to the barrel also aids in accuracy as well. bolt actions by their design and simplicity are one of the things that make them inherently accurate. simple is good many times.

glass bedding and pillar bedding are methods that can increase the accuracy of a rifle, by mating the stock and action into one cohesive unit. some of the new aftermarket stocks now use a bedding block or plate made directly into the stock, that only requires a person to properly torque the actions screws and usually doesn't need any glassbedding to gain optimum accuracy from that stock.

another key component in accuracy are the sights or bases and rings. you can't hit what you can't see. quality sights, or the bases and rings if using a a scope are a must. they must mount the scope securely, but not damage it when doing so. quality rings and bases are required for this.

scope selection is getting to be a must these days, as many bolt actions are coming from the factory, sans open sights. not putting open sights on rifles from the factory saves them manufactering costs when making that rifle. just like a matte finish is cheaper to make than a polished blued finish. my suggestion, buy the best scope that you can afford. the better the quality of the lenses, the higher the price of the scope usually. usually the harder the recoil of the rifle also dictates using a higher quality scope as well. recoil can damage reticles. many people shooting hard hitting magnums or rifles with massive recoil will also use fixed power scopes, because they have less moving parts to fail under massive recoil. hunting rifles as a general rule, don't need high magnification scopes and are more a liabilty than an advantage for hunting. they limit the field of view and make it harder to find the intended target. the large magnification scopes are more suited to target shooting or varmint hunting, where the target is more or less stationary and not moving about. a target shooter rifle needs a much higher quality scope when stepping out to longer distances. higher quality lenses are needed so the optics are clear and not distorted. the longer the distances, the more money needs to be spent on better optics. good optics cost money. better optics cost much more.

wood or synthetic? simple. comes down to personal preference. i like both, along with the laminated stocks. IMO, the laminated stocks offer the best of both worlds, the beauty of wood, with the durability of synthetic. and now days, there are many, many choices in laminates, from mild to wild in grain, patterns and colors. finely figured walnut is always nice too. with some nice checkering, an ebony fore-end tip a nice metal grip cap and beautiful recoil pad, a nice looking leather sling, with highly polished blued finish. nothing says quality rifle like those features. wood has been a staple of gun stocks for many, many years and i think for many more years to come. synthetics have seen a rise over the last couple of decades and have found a place. they are much cheaper to make, they hold up well in any environment and we don't get our feeling hurt if they get scratched or dented like we do on nice wood stock.

weight of a rifle. good thing to remember here is, weight is your friend when it comes to recoil. the more weight, the less felt recoil for that rifle. but, weight can cause problems and there sometimes has to be a trade-off, when it comes to weight. if walking and stalking or tracking game while hunting, a heavy rifle can or will tire you out carrying it all day long, especially up and down hills or mountains. stationary hunting or target shooting doesn't have the same weight concerns. a heavier rifle can be used and will soak up more recoil, allowing a person to shoot more rounds per day, because the recoil is not battering you as bad. weight doesn't change the amount of recoil a cartridge produces. it just makes it feel like less. this the felt recoil. a 30-06 with a 165 gr bullet will produce the same amount of recoil in a six pound rifle, as it does in a ten pound rifle, but it will feel like less recoil in the heavier rifle. stock design and material also have an effect on felt recoil as well. as a general rule, wood stocks are denser, so they soak up more recoil and have less felt recoil than synthetic stocks. this is only a general rule and there are exceptions to this rule.

we get lots of questions about used rifles. there are lots and lots of good deals to be had when buying used, if you know what to look for. i have picked up some great deals on used bolt actions. look for a good bore. the bore is probably the most important feature when shopping for a used rifle IMO. bright and sharp rifling are important. if you are are only looking to buy for the action, and are going to get it rebarreled, then this isn't a needed thing to worry about and skip over it. what shape is the stock in? not a huge issue for me, if i can get the rifle at a good price then order a replacement stock for it. i have done this several times in the past as well. trigger not quite to the liking? most rifles can be fitted with an aftermarket trigger very easily. many of them are not cheap, but well worth the money IMO. a good trigger is important to safety as well as accuracy and can make a world of difference. now the actual part of laying money down. what is the asking price and it's condition? this is important. the condition should reflect the price accordingly. if not sure about the price and if it's a good deal or not, the time to find out, is before you buy, not afterwards. ask around or check out what similiar rifles are selling for on GunBroker or other gun auction sites. the selling prices, not the asking prices. another point in favor of buying used, is that sometimes you can dicker on the price and get a good deal.

well more to come later!
nice synopsis - trigger next time?
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Old 09-26-2013, 08:42 PM   #328
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nice synopsis - trigger next time?
Chloe, check out post #223 where i did some discussion of my thoughts on triggers.

and thank you!
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Old 09-27-2013, 07:12 PM   #329
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One thing that has always made me think was years ago, before 91/30's were everywhere I built 2, both were counter bored. One was a 1942, The barrel had very faint rifling, but was really accurate. I bought some foaming bore cleaner and started to clean them. The 1943 that my son picked was all set after 1 treatment. Good strong rifling, altough dark. The '42, which was mine was another story. The black and green gunk that came out was like nothing I had ever seen. Afterwards it looked like a fuzz was coating the bore. Gave it another treatment and let it set twice as long. Serious black and green funk again. It still looked like it had something growing in the bore. 3rd treatment did it. It came out as pure sludge. The rifling was very strong although dark. It shot like a champ. Both rifles were completely miss matched as I bought the barreled actions, bolts, and stocks seperately. They cost about $65.00 each after all was said and done. I was at a military shoot and was offered 120.00 for the rifle after the shoot. Not even a thought, she had a very pleased new owner. It was a learning process to find out what makes these rifles really tick. You here people joke that they were not cleaned since Stalingrad, I beleive it.

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Old 10-12-2013, 07:50 PM   #330
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the subject i want to discuss now are barrels.

the barrel IMO, is the heart of the rifle. where all the magic takes place, so to speak. they come in all sizes and calibers, short and fat, to long and skinny!

factory barrels have a twist ratio that is adequate to stabilize a broader range of bullet weights. with an aftermarket barrel, you can optimize the twist to a certain bullet weight if desired. many competition shooters find this desireable.

barrel profiles are pretty much unlimited in aftermarket barrels as well. all the way from sleek and slender sporter type barrels to pare down the weight of the rifle, to massive untapered bull barrels that seem to weigh a ton! now we have talked about weight being your friend when it comes to felt recoil, especially in larger hard recoiling calibers, and this is one area where you can pick up some weight if desired. problem is, these will not be rifles that a person wouldwant to lug around all day up and down mountain and hillsides. they are really heavy and much more suited to bench and target shooting.

barrel fitting. with the exception of the Savage type of rifle barrel systems, that utilize a barrel lock nut, most all other barrels will need the services of the barrel maker, a gunsmith or a machinist to fit it to the reciever. with out the proper tools and equipment, this is better left to a skilled person, and not the weekend DIYer. on many rifles, the recoil lug also has to be fitted as well when fitting the barrel. many of the barrel makers offer the services of fitting your reciever to one of their barrels of your choosing. many times this is the least expensive option for many.

the list of custom rifle barrel makers is huge and varied. some that come to mind right offhand are, : Bartlein, Brux, Broughton, Hart, Krieger, McGowan, Lawton, Lilja, Pac-Nor, Shillen, Lothar Walther and many others.

a shot out barrel does not mean the death of a rifle. gettingit rebarreled can be a way to give it new life as the same caliber it came in, or even the opportunity to try something new and different. rebarreling gives you lots of choices and options that are opened up to you.

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