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Old 03-29-2011, 04:06 AM   #21
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got fired by pizza hut for not letting a scumbag steal my car. didnt shoot the guy he saw my gun and fled before i got it in play. never hurt my future employment. the goblin actually came back to the store and complained to the manager...
Umm, delivering pizza and working in the banking industry are two totally different worlds.

So what if Domino's hired you after getting fired from Pizza Hut. If even a bank teller gets fired for going against policy, then no other bank would want to hire them. Handling pizzas and handling insured money are not even close to the same thing.

You were carrying a .50 DE, right?
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Old 03-29-2011, 04:27 AM   #22
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Umm, delivering pizza and working in the banking industry are two totally different worlds.

So what if Domino's hired you after getting fired from Pizza Hut. If even a bank teller gets fired for going against policy, then no other bank would want to hire them. Handling pizzas and handling insured money are not even close to the same thing.

You were carrying a .50 DE, right?
Very true statement here, I believe. I would not want to get fired for carrying a gun. I would never get employed in my field again. But then again, I never really feel in danger where I work.

My son delivered pizzas the last two years of high school and all through college. He once had his money bag stolen. He doesn't own a gun and he (obviously) doesn't carry but I bet he wouldn't feel it was worth taking a life for his money bag.
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Old 03-30-2011, 02:05 AM   #23
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got fired by pizza hut for not letting a scumbag steal my car. didnt shoot the guy he saw my gun and fled before i got it in play. never hurt my future employment. the goblin actually came back to the store and complained to the manager...

my personal choice is, i will carry anytime i feel i need to regardless if ccw is legal or not.

but it is a call you gotta make for yourself. taking this sort of advice from interweb folks is about the same range as taking legal advice from us.
This.

My life is more important than any job. Also, when a potential employer asks you why you left your last position you can tell them whatever you want. If they call your previous employer all they can say is that you worked there. They can't say anything else, including the circumstances of your leaving the company.
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Old 03-30-2011, 02:41 AM   #24
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I keep a .22 mag minnie revolver in the van (service tech) but it only goes in my tool belt in certain nighborhoods. it's against company policy but my supervisors know and don't care as a few of them did the same when they were in the field.

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Old 03-30-2011, 02:43 AM   #25
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Also, when a potential employer asks you why you left your last position you can tell them whatever you want. If they call your previous employer all they can say is that you worked there. They can't say anything else, including the circumstances of your leaving the company.
Hmm. That is very interesting! I had never heard of this before and will definitely look into it.

*edit*

Preliminary searches do suggest otherwise, though:
Answers.com - Can a former employer inform a prospective employer the reasons for an employee being fired

Liz Handlin's Ultimate Resumes Blog: Can My Old Employer Tell Potential Employers That They Fired Me?

Answers.com - Is it legal in oklahoma for a former employer to tell a inquiring new employer you were fired for coming to work intoxicated when it was never proven

Employees: Job Termination Rights FAQs - Lawyers.com

Pretty much every one of them describes the same rules: a former employer can say anything that is clearly true and not slanderous or defamatory. So, they could say "we let him go after discovering he was concealing a firearm at work without permission," even if they couldn't get away with saying "we fired him for being a lying, deceitful man who doesn't deserve to work anywhere."
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Old 03-30-2011, 02:48 AM   #26
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This.

Also, when a potential employer asks you why you left your last position you can tell them whatever you want. If they call your previous employer all they can say is that you worked there. They can't say anything else, including the circumstances of your leaving the company.
Untrue, a former employer can state you were treminated instead of leaving on your own. In some states may have to word it differently "is this person eligable for rehire". If the answer is no the prospective employer knows you were fired. That would prompt your prospective employer to ask you to explain. Also many companies ask a prospective employee to sign a release for former employers to provide information concerning your employment history (often a few sentences on the bottom of an application). With that release in hand the former employer can release any documented information including circumstances why you left the company with out concern as you gave premission for the information to be made available to the prospective employer. Final point if you were terminated due to having a firearm on company property against company policy your former employer may file a restraining order/no tresspass order on you. This will show up on a background check if your prospective employer requires this.
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Old 03-30-2011, 02:56 AM   #27
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Hmm. That is very interesting! I had never heard of this before and will definitely look into it.

*edit*

Preliminary searches do suggest otherwise, though:
Answers.com - Can a former employer inform a prospective employer the reasons for an employee being fired

Liz Handlin's Ultimate Resumes Blog: Can My Old Employer Tell Potential Employers That They Fired Me?

Answers.com - Is it legal in oklahoma for a former employer to tell a inquiring new employer you were fired for coming to work intoxicated when it was never proven

Employees: Job Termination Rights FAQs - Lawyers.com

Pretty much every one of them describes the same rules: a former employer can say anything that is clearly true and not slanderous or defamatory. So, they could say "we let him go after discovering he was concealing a firearm at work without permission," even if they couldn't get away with saying "we fired him for being a lying, deceitful man who doesn't deserve to work anywhere."
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Untrue, a former employer can state you were treminated instead of leaving on your own. In some states may have to word it differently "is this person eligable for rehire". If the answer is no the prospective employer knows you were fired. That would prompt your prospective employer to ask you to explain. Also many companies ask a prospective employee to sign a release for former employers to provide information concerning your employment history (often a few sentences on the bottom of an application). With that release in hand the former employer can release any documented information including circumstances why you left the company with out concern as you gave premission for the information to be made available to the prospective employer. Final point if you were terminated due to having a firearm on company property against company policy your former employer may file a restraining order/no tresspass order on you. This will show up on a background check if your prospective employer requires this.
Hmm, seems I am mistaken. Regardless, I'd rather loose my job than my life.
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Old 03-30-2011, 03:42 AM   #28
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Hmm, seems I am mistaken. Regardless, I'd rather loose my job than my life.
Yep mistaken and I think we all would chose losing our job over losing our life.

What kind of work are you doing? Most can go to work and leave there CC in the car with out fear. Like most I keep it in prospective, my profession affords the life I have, the threat in the work place is low. If I can't afford my life with out the job. Yen and Yang sort of thing and most seem to make it work out.
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Old 03-30-2011, 04:30 AM   #29
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This.

My life is more important than any job. Also, when a potential employer asks you why you left your last position you can tell them whatever you want. If they call your previous employer all they can say is that you worked there. They can't say anything else, including the circumstances of your leaving the company.
I know this has been cleared up in the most nearly legal sense, but there are other ways of a potential employer to find out. I was a headhunter for a few years and one of the things we did when doing a background check is ask the same. Fired or quit; eligible for rehire; and the ever so informational, "off the record." You would be surprised what a former employer will tell you once you tell them it is "off the record". If they won't say if fired or quit and say not eligible for rehire, at the VERY least, you know they may have quit without notice. That alone will be cause for future employers to pass.

Many industries are very close knit as the "bosses" know of each other. Banking is one of them. You really don't know if the president of one bank knows or even golfs with the president of another.
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Old 03-30-2011, 04:46 AM   #30
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Yep mistaken and I think we all would chose losing our job over losing our life.

What kind of work are you doing? Most can go to work and leave there CC in the car with out fear. Like most I keep it in prospective, my profession affords the life I have, the threat in the work place is low. If I can't afford my life with out the job. Yen and Yang sort of thing and most seem to make it work out.
Yeah, I can get that. For me there are a lot of places I have to go that I don't feel comfortable going without my gun for work. I work as a field engineer for Hewlett Packard. I fix broken servers, printer, desktops, and laptops. It means going to some questionable places, and sometimes at night.

I guess I might feel differently if I worked in an office.

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I know this has been cleared up in the most nearly legal sense, but there are other ways of a potential employer to find out. I was a headhunter for a few years and one of the things we did when doing a background check is ask the same. Fired or quit; eligible for rehire; and the ever so informational, "off the record." You would be surprised what a former employer will tell you once you tell them it is "off the record". If they won't say if fired or quit and say not eligible for rehire, at the VERY least, you know they may have quit without notice. That alone will be cause for future employers to pass.

Many industries are very close knit as the "bosses" know of each other. Banking is one of them. You really don't know if the president of one bank knows or even golfs with the president of another.
Very good insight.

I would just like to point out that I don't lie during job interviews and I don't suggest it as a good practice. I was only using it to make a point. Sadly, I was mistaken so my hypothetical situation is completely wrong.
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