Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Handguns > Concealed Carrying & Personal Protection > Still a youngin... Any ideas on concealed handguns?

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Old 05-22-2013, 10:41 AM   #31
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If you're gonna carry, carry with one in the pipe. If you don't feel comfortable doing that, than you shouldn't be carrying/need more training/need a firearm that makes you comfortable carrying ready to go.

A gun without a chambered round is an expensive paper weight. Period.

All of my carry handguns are kept loaded with one in the chamber. The ones I'm not using are in the safe. I always know what condition they're in because it's always the same.

Think you can draw, rack and fire when I'm 5 feet in front of you, drawing down and trying to rob you? Nope, you can't. Action beats reaction. Why put yourself at a disadvantage?

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Old 05-22-2013, 11:16 AM   #32
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http://youtu.be/syxrpLbaEuY
http://youtu.be/bMbIC0RPBRs

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Old 05-22-2013, 12:24 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by JWSchramm View Post

I basically agree. I recommend keeping it in 9mm for now since that's what you're used to. Also, if you are a reloader, or ever get into it, it's just that much easier.

I like my M&P9c personally. With my Old Faithful IWB holster it disappears, despite being staggered stack. 12 round capacity in normal states (only 10 here in Kalifornia!). I bought mine for I think right at $600 brand new. I bet you can find good deals on a used one.

Another good choice of course, if you want even slimmer, is the M&P9 Shield. Although I understand a lot of people want them so finding them is pretty difficult right now.

If you want a revolver, there are lots of good choices. A good K frame S&W .357 Magnum (gonna prolly be used). I think most J frames are 5 shot? Don't quote me on that. K frames are still concealed well, especially if you get a round butt, snubbie.

Those are just my opinions. Of course I'm partial to my M&P. and I love Smith wheel guns. Just bought my first one, a 66-2 in 2.5".
+ 1 on the Shield. !!!
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Old 05-22-2013, 01:06 PM   #34
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The best answer anyone here can give you is to go out and shoot as many different makes and models as possible, and, based on your experience, narrow down the choices. What feels comfortable, and what you shoot the best. What works for one person may not be suitable at all for someone else. For instance, I suspect I am in the minority in what I like to carry. I like a heavier gun, in at least .40 caliber; I don't like composite or polymer frames, and I don't like Glocks or 9mm.

That being said . . . if this is going to be your first handgun, I would suggest getting a .22 either along with or instead of a larger caliber carry gun. It takes mucho practice to become a good pistol shot, and these days it will financally break you to buy enough center fire ammo to become a good pistol shot. I know that by what I am going to say next will cause some other members of this forum to pick up pointy rocks and form a circle around me, but something like a Ruger SP101 in .22 caliber could be used as a practice gun, and carried for self defense. Is a .22 the best self defense caliber --no, but I sure wouldn't want to get shot with one, and it would be an initial compromise between affordable practice and a dedicated self defense weapon. I cannot emphasize the importance of practice enough with new shooter. Being able to just be on the paper at 7 yards is not proficiency with a handgun.

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Old 05-22-2013, 02:47 PM   #35
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Why buy a .22 to practice with when he's going to outgrow it and move up to a respectable defense caliber anyway? Based on his avatar it looks like he's a Marine; I'm sure he can handle a 9mm, .40 or .45. He said his budget is $600ish, he could buy a .22 and an OK defense pistol or buy one of the aforementioned, proven pistols and still have $ for some range time.

I just don't understand the logic of buying one gun, practicing with it, then buying another just to have to practice more to be proficient with the new gun. Just buy what you are going to carry and train with it. Not ragging on the .22 recommendation guy, but it doesn't make much sense to me.

In the military or police academy they don't start you off with a smaller weapon only to move you up to a larger gun later, and both of those institutions have to teach to the lowest common denominator/slowest learning recruits. They train with what they'll be using.

Develop your muscle memory on the gun you'll be carrying.

9mm isn't all that expensive, and money will be saved in the long run versus buying a training-wheels gun and then a reliable CCW.

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Old 05-22-2013, 02:56 PM   #36
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Sad i haven't seen any sig 938 recommendations yet. I thought it was going to be to small when i was looking for my first carry gun, but for some reason it just feels right in my hands. And personally i feel that 6+1 in 124gr hydra shocks is plenty. Its towards the top end of your price range though, got mine for 689 (with night sights) during the gun scare recently. LGS now has them for a little over 500 without night sights

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Old 05-22-2013, 03:04 PM   #37
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighSpeed View Post
Why buy a .22 to practice with when he's going to outgrow it and move up to a respectable defense caliber anyway? Based on his avatar it looks like he's a Marine; I'm sure he can handle a 9mm, .40 or .45. He said his budget is $600ish, he could buy a .22 and an OK defense pistol or buy one of the aforementioned, proven pistols and still have $ for some range time.

I just don't understand the logic of buying one gun, practicing with it, then buying another just to have to practice more to be proficient with the new gun. Just buy what you are going to carry and train with it. Not ragging on the .22 recommendation guy, but it doesn't make much sense to me.

In the military or police academy they don't start you off with a smaller weapon only to move you up to a larger gun later, and both of those institutions have to teach to the lowest common denominator/slowest learning recruits. They train with what they'll be using.

Develop your muscle memory on the gun you'll be carrying.

9mm isn't all that expensive, and money will be saved in the long run versus buying a training-wheels gun and then a reliable CCW.
Um. . . yes, most cops and soldiers are excellent pistol shots. Not. And why do you say he'll outgrow it? My .22's are some of my most often used and enjoyable to shoot handguns.

As I stated, a good reason for starting out with a .22 is the cost of the thousands of rounds needed to make a good pistol shot. Besides:

You said:

"He said his budget is $600ish, he could buy a .22 and an OK defense pistol or buy one of the aforementioned, proven pistols and still have $ for some range time. "

I said:

" if this is going to be your first handgun, I would suggest getting a .22 either along with or instead of a larger caliber carry gun."

I think getting both is the best idea, but not sure it could be done for $600.
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Old 05-22-2013, 03:11 PM   #38
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No macho factor involved, but why take the time to learn two different weapon platforms when all of his time could be devoted to one self defense gun and he can develop muscle memory and proficiency with what he's going to carry?

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Old 05-22-2013, 03:14 PM   #39
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One thing is for sure there are as many options as there are people for great edc's.What's important is that you pick the right one for you.This requires that you get as much hands on,with as many models and makes as you possibly can.I won't be giving you my personal fanboy view of what you should buy.What you should be looking for in a edc is something that fits just right in you're hand,when you pick up the one that feels like an extension of you.Something that points naturally and has a trigger pull that seems made just for you.After you've found this ask you're lgs proprietor if you may slip it in you're carry position.Most will allow you to do this,but you should always ask first.Doing this will allow you to figure out two things,(1) that the pistol is what you want for how you intend to carry,(2) what you want in a rig.Last but not least always research you're choice to find out about reliability and accessories such as mags,sights,holsters etc.etc.etc..I hope this helps you find what you need and I hope it saves you a little bit of dough.Everyone has their favorite pistol make and model but only you can answer which one is for you.

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Old 05-22-2013, 03:15 PM   #40
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Plus he didn't say he was looking for a 'fun' gun to shoot, he's looking for a CCW. .22 is not considered an adequate self defense round. Sure, people die from them and I investigated a guy who got offed with a POS Jennings .22. But by and large it's not considered something with enough stopping power for an SD gun.

I own 4 .22pistols and a 10/22. They're fun, but I wouldn't bring them to a gunfight if I had a choice.

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