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loctite44144 01-13-2013 12:48 AM

So what should I expect
 
Next weekend I'm going for my CCW I have been shooting for for about a year and a half now like what goes on in the classroom or on the range

fupuk 01-13-2013 01:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by loctite44144 (Post 1091150)
Next weekend I'm going for my CCW I have been shooting for for about a year and a half now like what goes on in the classroom or on the range

What state are you in? Here in Michigan the class was full of good information and honestly the range time was boring. Pay attention in class and take as many notes as you can and ask alot of questions.

sdiver35 01-13-2013 01:27 AM

In KY it's a long video detailing the laws - verbatim. The instructor will stop and touch on specifics and answer questions. I'm glad you took the time to practice and then get your CCW. My class had way too many folks that didn't even know the basics about their firearm, much less visit a range prior to the day of the class. In fact, most had to get help taking their pistol apart to clean it prior to the qualification.

Dearhunter 01-13-2013 01:27 AM

In class, just listen and pay attention and you will have no problem, ask questions if not clear to you. The shooting part is basic and easy, just keep your finger off the trigger until ready to fire.

loctite44144 01-13-2013 01:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fupuk (Post 1091189)

What state are you in? Here in Michigan the class was full of good information and honestly the range time was boring. Pay attention in class and take as many notes as you can and ask alot of questions.

Live in Ohio

BeyondTheBox 01-13-2013 08:37 PM

I cannot tell you what it's like in Ohio, but in Oregon it was a person talking about what to and not to do should you ever be involved in a gun fight. Mostly revolved around covering your tush and saying nothing to the cops other than lawyering up. Also when it's legal to use your firearm and how to ensure any possible jury understands the need for you doing so.

There was no range time, didn't even have guns with us. No test; no passing or failing, it was just me and her in the back of her little shop.

Bear304inc 01-14-2013 12:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BeyondTheBox
I cannot tell you what it's like in Ohio, but in Oregon it was a person talking about what to and not to do should you ever be involved in a gun fight. Mostly revolved around covering your tush and saying nothing to the cops other than lawyering up. Also when it's legal to use your firearm and how to ensure any possible jury understands the need for you doing so.

There was no range time, didn't even have guns with us. No test; no passing or failing, it was just me and her in the back or her little shop.

How very reassuring.

BeyondTheBox 01-14-2013 01:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Bear304inc (Post 1092612)

How very reassuring.

If you have something to say I always appreciate insight and/or intelligent conversation, but unspecified sarcasm serves nothing.

What do you want reassurance on? What purpose would it serve?

Colby 01-14-2013 02:11 AM

Ohio is a twelve hour course. Sometimes three days, sometimes two days, sometimes all twelve hours in one day.

Mine consisted of 9 - 10 hours of classroom time, including a written exam, followed by 2-3 hours of range time.
The classroom involved every aspect of firearms that you can think of - lectures and training on both revolvers and semi-autos and comparisons - with more extensive semi-auto stuff - since you must recognize and be able to deal with the failure to feed, jamming, stovepiping, etc - that semi's are prone to - and how to prepare for/handle/clear them.
Limitations of each type weapon - safety - handling of weapons - loading - types of carry - holsters, iwb,owb, shoulder, etc, speed loading, dress (cover for your weapon - what works - what doesn't)
Gun placement in the home, car, safes, - gun cleaning, cartridges, gun power, suitability, ...
Likely scenarios - home - street - social -...what happens in situations.
Psychology of the bad guy, of you, of the police, on you if forced to use your gun.
The law. Legal limitations - places - , potential legal troubles. Your legal responsibilities... Police car stop stuff...

The practical - range time. Interesting. It's good you have shot before. They have you do various shoots - on command. Some aiming - some pointing. Some rapid fire - some slower - on command - with reloads. Stress that ccw defense is close up and usually panic - so careful aiming is usually not the case and could slow you down - point and shoot more likely. They will call out scenarios - straight target shots - and will also set up behind the door or wall scenarios - type shooting for you - and teach you how to protect yourself from gunfire from the bad guy - this was kind of an eye opener.... not as apparent as it seems - and they kind of beat you up about it if you don't think right.
Most importantly, they want to see if you can safely handle a gun. They explain safe handling. If you do something unsafe they will fail you - run you out of the range.

I'm certain that I missed some stuff - but I think you get the picture - it's pretty extensive - at least that is how mine was. It is a very good thing. It would be good to take the class every year. There is a lot there.

I hope yours is just as good.

Oh -- just a tip. I hope you take a semi-auto with you. If you don't have one, rent one - that is what I did. (The Ruger Mark III 22 I rented was excellent - and cheap -- I liked it so much I eventually bought one for practice.) Semi- auto is good - reason ... reloading. In the call out scenarios they will want you to do rapid reloads. With a revolver it can be a mess. One guy used his single action revolver - and he was not good with it - what a mess! Under barrel extractor for each casing and one at a time chamber loading - really held things up. The instructors had to take special care of that guy because he could not do quickly what the instructors asked. They want you to put a bunch of shots out - hold - bunch more - through reloads with another magazine.
Now if the guy had used a double action with roll out cylinder and speed loaders or strips - he'd likely been able to keep up. But no...
I'm thinking we used somewhere around 100 rounds.

Bear304inc 01-14-2013 02:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BeyondTheBox

If you have something to say I always appreciate insight and/or intelligent conversation, but unspecified sarcasm serves nothing.

What do you want reassurance on? What purpose would it serve?

Your kidding right, your course was you and a an instructor in the back of the shop, no test of any kind? Not even range competence? I'm not saying you yourself are not competent, but I feel like there should be some basic safety, range test. Not everybody should just be handed such responsibility unearned,, this is not public school, you don't just pass just for going.


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