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-   -   Sling Backpacks are cheap and tactical (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f17/sling-backpacks-cheap-tactical-18029/)

sausn2002 09-14-2009 03:39 AM

Sling Backpacks are cheap and tactical
 
I came to this conclusion. Sling Backpacks are tactical, good for concealed carry, and are not expensive (about $20).

Why settle for the expensive packs like Maxpedition when you can get a simple pack for cheaper. You can slip the pack from behind you to the front and take a concealed weapon out for defense. It's highly discreet, because just about anybody would have a backpack (like students). You can keep waters and stuff in it, and it's fairly light weight. It's good for anything but extreme outdoorsy stuff. It's perhaps good for hiking situations.

I'm not trying to promote to buy this, but I'm saying that I was excited to find out how tactical this is without paying out of the pocket too much for it.

I was actually really wondering what everybody else thought? I'd love to hear what ya'll suggestions are.:cool:

I noticed that in the new upcoming video game, "Splinter Cell: Conviction" that the character Sam Fisher uses a sling backpack.

Gojubrian 09-14-2009 07:12 AM

Yes, but it would be difficult to get to it in a pinch. Too slow. :)

hogger129 09-14-2009 10:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gojubrian (Post 159412)
Yes, but it would be difficult to get to it in a pinch. Too slow. :)

Agreed. I would think one would be able to draw a sidearm more quickly from the side or back out of a holster than a backpack.

What about a cross-draw holster? I think they also call it a hogleg.

Jess 09-14-2009 10:40 AM

I was looking at one the other day, I might have to pick one up. For me its not always practical to carry on my person based on where I am or the activity that I'm doing. the backpack would make it easier to lock in the car w/o drawing attention too. While drawing from a holster would certainly be faster I think you would just need to change your defensive stradegy

sausn2002 09-14-2009 11:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jess (Post 159428)
I was looking at one the other day, I might have to pick one up. For me its not always practical to carry on my person based on where I am or the activity that I'm doing. the backpack would make it easier to lock in the car w/o drawing attention too. While drawing from a holster would certainly be faster I think you would just need to change your defensive stradegy

That's what I mean. It's good for the situations where you may not be comfortable or able to have a holster.

I understand what everyone else is saying about a sling backpack being slower to draw a weapon from, but I'm aware of this. Sometimes if you are close and personal with people you don't know, people may still be able to see that you have something under your shirt (especially for the slimmer people like myself). And for hiking, you may not want to have that gun pressing into you while concealed, and/or be sweating all over your gun (no matter what you think, if you sweat enough, eventually you will soak that area, and even though it's good to have it for safety's sake, you still may not want to be very uncomfortable, especially if you are wondering around hours on end).

It's just a suggestion and I really appreciate the opinions, guys. They are all very true opinions on this.;)

sausn2002 09-14-2009 11:56 AM

Anyone actually have experience using these Sling Backpacks in this way? If so, what's the best layout of one of these (way it's designed/setup)?

I prefer refering to the everyday/student use Sling Bags that are like around $20 to $30, not the expensive ones like Maxpedition which is already geared towards people with personal firearms/extreme outdooring.

ccr203 09-14-2009 02:37 PM

One of the concerns with that type of concealment vs. having your weapon holstered on your person, is if some thief decides that they need your bag,backpack, concealed carry bag/purse, more than you do. If they get it, now the bonus reward for them is your loaded weapon. This presents several different problems for you, not to mention if your weapons permit requires you to carry a specific weapon, as some states require. This I realize is a "what if" situation, but just a consideration if you plan to employ this type of concealment.
I would like to add if you are going to leave a weapon in a vehicle, investing in a lock box for the vehicle to secure it. For the same reasons stated above.

Just some food for thought.

Stay safe.

Chris

mpd8488 09-14-2009 09:12 PM

You've actually piqued my interest with this idea. As a student carrying concealed can be especially tricky because if by some chance somebody spots the imprint of your firearm, people will freak out (I do go to school in Virginia after all). I ride a bike several miles to campus everyday so heavy clothing isn't really an option while it's still so damn hot out.

Here it isn't illegal for me to carry concealed on campus, but I would get thrown out of school and the campus police would arrest me (even if it's a false arrest). I've known people to get called into the dean for having a pocket knife fall out of their pocket. Having it in a backpack is better than not having it at all despite the drawbacks.


Besides, who the hell would expect somebody carrying a man purse to be packing?

Dillinger 09-14-2009 11:56 PM

I have two sling packs that I have carried for years now. They are a great everyday camoflauge, especially for packing.

HOWEVER:

CHECK THE LAWS IN YOUR AREA, THIS MAY NOT BE LEGAL!!
The nice thing about a backpack that has only one sling is that with just a shrug of your shoulder, the pack slides down to your wrist and your other hand can be opening the zipper.

I am left handed, but I shoot right handed ( I got lucky and had a father with foresight ). So, I carry my bag on my right shoulder. If I need in it, it slips down to my right hand, I lower the bag to the table/bench/ground as my left hand unzips and my right hand is instantly inside searching for what I want.

Now, in the event of an emergency, I would say I can go from inconspicious to armed and ready in about 3-5 seconds, which unless I am the target of the threat, gives me PLENTY of time....

I love the backpack carry option. I have used it for years, all over the country and I have never once been stopped, questioned or even had any indication that anyone was the wiser to what my little black backpack was toting around. :D

JD

sausn2002 09-15-2009 01:56 AM

Sweet! Dillinger, I think you hit it right on the money. Well, I bought one today, and say that it is quite awesome. Great idea! Knowing someone else put it to the test already gives me more confidence about my idea. Thanks!


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