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-   -   Crimson trace for ccw (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f17/crimson-trace-ccw-93120/)

wieseman71 06-29-2013 10:19 PM

Crimson trace for ccw
 
Hey guys & gals sorry if this has been covered.
I'm debating on weather to put a laser on my ccw . I can see some valid uses for it in doors or at night, I can also see it being a perfect target for a bad guy!! Just asking for your thoughts. I kind of think it may become a really expensive dog toy.

MisterMcCool 06-29-2013 10:20 PM

Can't hurt. Might help.

Missouribound 07-04-2013 03:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wieseman71 (Post 1290583)
Hey guys & gals sorry if this has been covered.
I'm debating on weather to put a laser on my ccw . I can see some valid uses for it in doors or at night, I can also see it being a perfect target for a bad guy!! Just asking for your thoughts. I kind of think it may become a really expensive dog toy.

It's a good tool for a couple of reasons. First of all, in a situation where you are unable to get in a normal firing position to look through the sights, you can still get a line on the target. And secondly, which is a bonus, you can watch where the laser points as you progress through your firing procedure (dry fire). The terms "too little or too much finger" get a positive reference when you have a laser to show you exactly what is happening.

TekGreg 07-04-2013 08:10 AM

Also, lasers can act as a kind of force multiplier when facing a SD situation. Convicted felons are used to lasers used on guard rifles in prisons and can add to the intimidation factor of a firearm. This could help diffuse the situation without a shot being fired, which is always a good thing for everyone involved. Practicing drawing, aiming and trigger control is better with a laser because it accentuates unnecessary movements and shows you if you have trigger control problems. If, as you pull the trigger back completely, the laser dips, rises or comes off the target, you can work to make your action smoother. Make sure to keep a written record of practice like this as it can be submitted in court as evidence of your competency and desire to reduce damage to innocents.

mdauben 07-05-2013 02:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TekGreg
Also, lasers can act as a kind of force multiplier when facing a SD situation. Convicted felons are used to lasers used on guard rifles in prisons and can add to the intimidation factor of a firearm. This could help diffuse the situation without a shot being fired, which is always a good thing for everyone

I totally agree that ending a situation WITHOUT shooting someone is the best possible outcome. Just an important note, you still need to be be legally justified in shooting someone ("fear death or serious bodily injury") to *point* a gun at someone or you could be liable for charges of assault if the police do become involved.

TekGreg 07-06-2013 08:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mdauben
I totally agree that ending a situation WITHOUT shooting someone is the best possible outcome. Just an important note, you still need to be be legally justified in shooting someone ("fear death or serious bodily injury") to *point* a gun at someone or you could be liable for charges of assault if the police do become involved.

Oh, very much so! I guess I didn't say that right because I never draw my weapon unless I'm justified to fire. Therefore, holstering without a loud noise is just a bigger benefit! Also, if I draw, I call the police, even if he runs off. That stops them looking for an armed assailant when my mugger goes home and tells the story in a completely different way. ;-)

eatmydust 07-06-2013 10:45 AM

My two main CC guns have a laser. I have a Crimson Trace laser on my LC9 and a LaserLyte sidemount on my Hellcat II .380, I use the sights but in a high voltage situation, I like my odds better with rather than without them. I also like my wife to have a better point of reference available to her.

If you get a laser, of any type, never paint someone's eyes with it, it can blind them.

johnr1943 07-06-2013 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wieseman71 (Post 1290583)
Hey guys & gals sorry if this has been covered.
I'm debating on weather to put a laser on my ccw . I can see some valid uses for it in doors or at night, I can also see it being a perfect target for a bad guy!! Just asking for your thoughts. I kind of think it may become a really expensive dog toy.

Cat love it also, so save your money, spend it on professional training. Professional training doesn't require batteries. My $.02 :)

imashoota 10-24-2013 10:47 PM

sighting in your Crimson Trace
 
Y'all may already know this already, but I found out the hard way. The paperwork that comes with Crimson Trace laser sights informs the user which way (clockwise versus counterclockwise) and into which hole the allen wrench must be turned to move the laser dot right, left, up, and down. What the instructions do NOT say is that if your shots are grouping right, the dot must be moved to the right to bring the group left. This is somewhat counterintuitive since, when adjusting iron sights, moving the rear sight to the left moves your group to the left. I guess the bottom line is that when making laser sight adjustments, follow the FORS rule for the front sight ("Forward = Opposite; Rear = Same"). Think about it. If the dot is moved further to the right, you would have to move the firearm to the left in order for the dot to appear over the middle of the perfect iron-sight picture.

Mouser 10-25-2013 02:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by imashoota (Post 1412352)
Y'all may already know this already, but I found out the hard way. The paperwork that comes with Crimson Trace laser sights informs the user which way (clockwise versus counterclockwise) and into which hole the allen wrench must be turned to move the laser dot right, left, up, and down. What the instructions do NOT say is that if your shots are grouping right, the dot must be moved to the right to bring the group left. This is somewhat counterintuitive since, when adjusting iron sights, moving the rear sight to the left moves your group to the left. I guess the bottom line is that when making laser sight adjustments, follow the FORS rule for the front sight ("Forward = Opposite; Rear = Same"). Think about it. If the dot is moved further to the right, you would have to move the firearm to the left in order for the dot to appear over the middle of the perfect iron-sight picture.

Agreed on this...it took me many extra rounds to sight in my crimson trace as it was not intuitive...just plan on spending enough time and ammo to do it...also, small adjustments make pretty large movements in the group so think small increments. Once it is dialed in though, it is awesome :D


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