Guns and Military Suicides
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Old 10-08-2012, 04:23 AM   #1
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Default Guns and Military Suicides

When will they realize that it is not guns, availability of guns or anything of that sort that is the problem? The problem is that our combat veterans are not getting the psychological help that they need when they return home!


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TOP NEWS

As Military Suicides Rise, Focus Is on Private Weapons
By JAMES DAO

Published: October 08, 2012

With nearly half of all suicides in the military having been committed with privately owned firearms, the Pentagon and Congress are moving to establish policies intended to separate at-risk service members from their personal weapons.

The issue is a thorny one for the Pentagon. Gun rights advocates and many service members fiercely oppose any policies that could be construed as limiting the private ownership of firearms.

But as suicides continue to rise this year, senior Defense Department officials are developing a suicide prevention campaign that will encourage friends and families of potentially suicidal service members to safely store or voluntarily remove personal firearms from their homes.

"This is not about authoritarian regulation," said Dr. Jonathan Woodson, the assistant secretary of defense for health affairs. "It is about the spouse understanding warning signs and, if there are firearms in the home, responsibly separating the individual at risk from the firearm."

Dr. Woodson, who declined to provide details, said the campaign would also include measures to encourage service members, their friends and their relatives to remove possibly dangerous prescription drugs from the homes of potentially suicidal troops.

In another step considered significant by suicide-prevention advocates, Congress appears poised to enact legislation that would allow military mental health counselors and commanders to talk to troops about their private firearms. The measure, which is being promoted by the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, would amend a law enacted last year that prohibited the Defense Department from collecting information from service members about lawfully owned firearms kept at home.

The 2011 measure, which was part of the Defense Authorization Act and passed at the urging of the National Rifle Association, was viewed by many military officials as preventing commanders and counselors from discussing gun safety with potentially suicidal troops. But the N.R.A. said that the provision was a response to efforts by Army commanders to maintain records of all the firearms owned by their soldiers.

The new amendment, part of the defense authorization bill for 2013 that has been passed by the House of Representatives but not by the Senate, would allow mental health professionals and commanders to ask service members about their personal firearms if they have "reasonable grounds" to believe the person is at "high risk" of committing suicide or harming others.

"We're O.K. with the commanding officer being able to inquire," said Andrew Arulanandam, a spokesman for the N.R.A., "but they can't confiscate."

Senator James M. Inhofe, an Oklahoma Republican who sponsored the original 2011 restrictions, said he would support the new amendment "if it clears up any confusion."

"This is a national tragedy that Congress, all branches of D.O.D. and numerous outside organizations have been working together to solve," Mr. Inhofe said in a statement. The Senate is not expected to take the bill until after Election Day.

Suicides in the military rose sharply from 2005 to 2009, reaching 285 active-duty service members and 24 reservists in 2009. As the services expanded suicide prevention programs, the numbers leveled off somewhat in 2010 and 2011.

But this year, the numbers are on track to outpace the 2009 figures, with about 270 active-duty service members, half of them from the Army, having killed themselves as of last month.

According to Defense Department statistics, more than 6 of 10 military suicides are by firearms, with nearly half involving privately owned guns. In the civilian population, guns are also the most common method of suicide among young males, though at a somewhat lower rate.

When active-duty troops who live on bases or are deployed are identified as potentially suicidal, commanders typically take away their military firearms. But commanders do not have that authority with private firearms kept off base. Instead, commanders would often urge potentially suicidal troops to give their guns to friends or relatives or have them stored on base.

Military health care professionals said the 2011 law inhibited those kinds of conversations. "It ties the hands of clinicians and the command," said Dr. Stephen Xenakis, a psychiatrist and retired brigadier general who recommends amending the 2011 law.

Some military mental health specialists say the government should do much more than just amend the 2011 law. Dr. Elspeth Cameron Ritchie, a psychiatrist, retired colonel and former mental health adviser to the Army surgeon general, said the Pentagon should aggressively promote gun safety as well as consider making it harder for at-risk troops to buy ammunition and weapons at on-base gun stores.

"I am troubled that on the one hand we are saying we are doing all we can to decrease suicide and on the other making it so easy for service members to buy weapons," Dr. Ritchie said.

Many military officials say the Pentagon is not prepared to go that far. But some suicide experts do see a greater willingness on the part of senior Pentagon officials to discuss the links between firearms and suicide.

They note that several prominent retired officers, including Peter W. Chiarelli, a former Army vice chief of staff, have begun speaking publicly about the issue. And they note that the military has begun taking small steps to encourage gun safety, including giving away trigger locks at a recent Pentagon health fair.

"You've got to realize the cultural change when trigger locks are given out in the Pentagon," said Bruce Shahbaz, an Army suicide prevention expert. "That's huge."

In the Department of Veterans Affairs, mental health counselors and suicide hot line agents routinely encourage suicidal veterans to store their guns or give them to relatives. But the issue remains difficult, with concerns that some veterans avoid mental health care because they fear their firearms will be confiscated.

"It is sensitive," said Jan Kemp, the department's national suicide prevention coordinator. "We don't in any way want to imply that we would want to take people's right to bear firearms away."

Andy Lehren contributed reporting.
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:04 AM   #2
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Makes you wonder about this? The Military is also backing Mrs. Obama's war on junk food. Under Obama the new army will not use firearms and only eat tofu MREs.

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Old 10-08-2012, 05:13 AM   #3
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guns are only the object used to commit the deed. they are not the problem. these soldiers need counseling that they are probably not getting. even if guns are eliminated from the environment, and a person wished to end their life, their are always ways of doing it. guns are not the problem. obviously these people need help that they are not getting.

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Old 10-08-2012, 05:13 AM   #4
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The really morbid thought I had (and it may not be far from reality) is that the military likes the high suicide rates because it reduces their obligation towards our veterans.

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Old 10-08-2012, 05:15 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by axxe55 View Post
guns are only the object used to commit the deed. they are not the problem. these soldiers need counseling that they are probably not getting. even if guns are eliminated from the environment, and a person wished to end their life, their are always ways of doing it. guns are not the problem. obviously these people need help that they are not getting.
Absolutely correct. A train, bridge, meds, or even a cop will work if one cannot get their hands on a gun. The gun is just a tool that can be replaced with another tool.
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Old 10-08-2012, 05:29 AM   #6
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sounds to me like the Pentagon is shirking their responsibilities of tending to injured veterans by placing blame on someone/something else

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Old 10-08-2012, 09:53 AM   #7
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Private gun ownership in the military isnt increasing, suicide is! Their blamethrowers are aimed in the wrong direction. Is it private owned guns that are the problem or endless deployments, wars that turned into Peace keeping missions and terrorists posing as allies killing our folks that send our very best over the edge?

I think we know the answer, its not the guns, its the wars...

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Old 10-08-2012, 10:17 AM   #8
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If i saw one of my battle buddies hurting emotionaly i wouldnt be worried about taking his guns away i would be more interested in gettin him to a chaplain or down to mental health to get some health never leave a fallen comrade

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Old 10-08-2012, 11:33 AM   #9
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If i saw one of my battle buddies hurting emotionaly i wouldnt be worried about taking his guns away i would be more interested in gettin him to a chaplain or down to mental health to get some health never leave a fallen comrade
Aint that the truth!

Sadly Soldiers are better than most at hiding their pain than most and restricting their access to private weapons will only likely lead to desperate yet less solitary acts that involve others. Never question the resolve of a Service Member on the warpath especially when they consider themselves the Enemy Within.
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Old 10-08-2012, 11:50 AM   #10
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If i saw one of my battle buddies hurting emotionaly i wouldnt be worried about taking his guns away i would be more interested in gettin him to a chaplain or down to mental health to get some health never leave a fallen comrade
Thats great except for the fact that the military is not equipped to deal with soldiers mental problems. Take a bud to the shrink or chaplain and theres a very good chance he will be ostracized by his chain of command. During the Vietnam war the US military would simply call the guy a doper.

The US military has been run to death with combat tours. Some have served 6-8 combat tours since 9/11. This stuff happened because one percent of the US population is responsible for fighting this countrys wars.

My Godson is a special operations soldier. He has spent 87 months in Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11. To put it bluntly hes a walking time bomb; unable to effectively communicate with his own family. i can't even hunt with the guy because he is afraid he will "return fire" if i shoot at a hog or deer.

The US Army is ill equipped to deal with the problems these soldiers have. Once a soldier is discharged or retired it gets worse because VA funding is subject to the whims of the political hacks who sent those troops off to war. This political appointee puke said veterans benefits are hurtful to national security:

http://www.veteranstoday.com/2005/01/27/veterans-benefits/

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“In an interview with the Wall Street Journal (1-25-05), Pentagon official David Chu, in a mockery of the contribution of veterans, defended a new round of cuts by ironically describing funding for programs like veterans’ education and job training, health care, pensions, VA housing and the like as “hurtful” to national security.”
As a severly disabled veteran and Army retiree i can tell you that General Shinseki has done a very good job at the VA. Veterans are getting better treatment than ever before in US history. But it is not enough; 45 percent of veterans apply for VA disabilities after being discharged. The VA system is overwhelmed. The cost of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan pale in comparison with the cost of caring for the veterans of those wars. A shrink told me: "PTSD is not about nightmares: PTSD is the re-occurance of traumatic events".

i hate to see US military personnel who have fought and bled for this country have their Second Amendment rights nullified because of mental difficulties.
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