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Old 12-27-2013, 12:25 PM   #21
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Heres a pic for you
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Last edited by CAR; 12-27-2013 at 12:29 PM.
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Old 12-27-2013, 12:48 PM   #22
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I have always used plain ole green Scotchbrite pads to get powder fouling off of stainless revolver cylinders. Unless your gun's stainless is highly polished or you really bear down, the scotch Brite pads won't leave scratches. I might have to check out the Never Dull though.
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Old 12-28-2013, 09:06 PM   #23
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The front of a revolver cylinder is actually a very precise piece of equipment.
It is machined flat-very flat, so that it mates properly with the forcing cone. Using any abrasive, especially ScotchbRite pads will dish the front of the cylinder around the chambers. Using Neverdull or Simichrome, or a Lead Away cloth once in a while probably won't have much effect.
But using any of these constantly WILL AFFECT YOUR BARREL/CYLINDER GAP.
This is not a good thing!
I know Flitz says it is "non abrasive," but it IS abrasive.
Leave the dark rings alone. If you have leading on your cylinder, it must be cleaned, but once the lead and EXCESS powder fouling is removed, STOP.
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Old 12-28-2013, 10:42 PM   #24
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BillDeShivs View Post
The front of a revolver cylinder is actually a very precise piece of equipment.
It is machined flat-very flat, so that it mates properly with the forcing cone. Using any abrasive, especially ScotchbRite pads will dish the front of the cylinder around the chambers. Using Neverdull or Simichrome, or a Lead Away cloth once in a while probably won't have much effect.
But using any of these constantly WILL AFFECT YOUR BARREL/CYLINDER GAP.
This is not a good thing!
I know Flitz says it is "non abrasive," but it IS abrasive.
Leave the dark rings alone. If you have leading on your cylinder, it must be cleaned, but once the lead and EXCESS powder fouling is removed, STOP.
This makes sense. I am giving a second thought to my practice of exterminating the cylinder face residue. Lead cloth works best anyway. It is also true that any polish is abrasive - it has to be to work. Good post BD.
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Old 02-06-2014, 04:12 AM   #25
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I have always used Never dull followed by a thorough cleaning and oiling. For years I used Outers solvents and oils. now I use Gunzilla, which is a non-toxic CLP that leaves a dry lube coating on the gun. I'm not saying it is the end all, be all, but those of use that shoot BP or Pyrodex know how much of a PITA it is to clean one of those smokepoles after a day at the range. With this stuff, I spray and swab before going out, and when I get home do a teardown and cleaning. I can clean the barrel on my Wolf or my Optima with 3 patches, and no residue. this is without using hot soapy water first.

Here's a link to their site. Check them out.http://www.gunzilla.us/
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Old 03-29-2014, 02:25 AM   #26
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A brush with some J-B will do wonders,
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Old 05-21-2014, 03:39 AM   #27
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I used Semi chrome and Flitz polishes to clean up a Colt staainless snub nose(only made in 1970), given to me by an Uncle. He carried in Nam last tours near salt water. the finish was corroded and lots of powder rings and so on. It took a while but it gleams like a jewel now, except for the stock grips. Stainless is not slick as chrome moly or steel. Would not use a stainless AR barrel if firing a lot.
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Old 05-21-2014, 06:27 AM   #28
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I just leave mine alone, not worth the hassle.............all that work and 6 booms later it's discolored again.
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