Powder marks and Stainless Steel
You are Unregistered, please register to use all of the features of FirearmsTalk.com!    
Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Gunsmithing & Do-It-Yourself Projects > Cleaning and Maintenance >

Powder marks and Stainless Steel


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 11-16-2013, 02:09 AM   #1
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Mouser's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Location: Now residing in Lower Alabama
Posts: 401
Liked 189 Times on 134 Posts
Likes Given: 196

Default Powder marks and Stainless Steel

I have numerous SS guns and love to shoot them. I do not love to clean the powder residue off of them....generally, I use standard cleaning supplies like solvent, gun oil and lots of elbow grease...

What do you use and is there a "miracle" solvent that takes the residue off easily?
__________________
Man once surrendering his reason, has no remaining guard against absurdities the most monstrous, and like a ship without rudder, is the sport of every wind.
-Thomas Jefferson to James Smith, 1822.
Mouser is offline  
 
Reply With Quote

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today - It's Free!

Are you a firearms enthusiast? Then we hope you will join the community. You will gain access to post, create threads, private message, upload images, join groups and more.

Firearms Talk is owned and operated by fellow firearms enthusiasts. We strive to offer a non-commercial community to learn and share information.

Join FirearmsTalk.com Today! - Click Here


Old 11-16-2013, 04:25 PM   #2
JTJ
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
JTJ's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Lake Havasu,Arizona
Posts: 7,298
Liked 2884 Times on 1582 Posts
Likes Given: 810

Default

The lead removal cloth does a good job.
__________________
Patron Member NRA
"I would not be an old man if I had not been an armed young man." JTJ
I was taught to respect my elders but they are getting harder to find.
JTJ is offline  
3
People Like This 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2013, 05:00 PM   #3
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: West, by God, Funroe,Louisiana
Posts: 18,707
Liked 9213 Times on 5058 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

Don't know what kind of guns you're shooting, but something I did with a stainless steel revolver...

The powder rings on the front of the cylinder! Gawd they're ugly. I cut a small disc out of a corrugated cardboard box and slapped it on a dremel. Using a very light touch and low RPMs, those powder rings buffed right off. I wouldn't think this would erode enough material to be a concern, as I did this enough to use up around 30 cardboard discs and the VERY fine machining marks still weren't even buffed out.
trip286 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2013, 05:55 PM   #4
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
clr8ter's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: South Central NH
Posts: 4,015
Liked 1337 Times on 895 Posts
Likes Given: 857

Default

Quote:
as I did this enough to use up around 30 cardboard discs and the VERY fine machining marks still weren't even buffed out.
Was that in one cleaning, or over a bunch of cleanings? Don't they make specific powder residue solvents? I have 2 SS rifles, and the muzzle gets residue on it. I used a Rem Oil cloth, and it came off pretty easily, and that was after it had been there a while.
clr8ter is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2013, 06:02 PM   #5
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Sep 2012
Location: The Edge of Darkness
Posts: 6,495
Liked 4797 Times on 2683 Posts
Likes Given: 1736

Default

The chamber mouth mating to the forcing cone is very critical. Using even light abrasives on a Dremel tool will result in uneven wear across the 6 chambers. This will increase the gas cutting of barrel throat over time.
I would use one of the powder and lead solvents.
nitestalker is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-16-2013, 06:41 PM   #6
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: West, by God, Funroe,Louisiana
Posts: 18,707
Liked 9213 Times on 5058 Posts
Likes Given: 74

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by clr8ter View Post

Was that in one cleaning, or over a bunch of cleanings? Don't they make specific powder residue solvents? I have 2 SS rifles, and the muzzle gets residue on it. I used a Rem Oil cloth, and it came off pretty easily, and that was after it had been there a while.
That was after about two years of cleanings. And if you have a dremel laying around, and cardboard, you're not buying anything. I forget though, not many people stay as broke as me.

This was on a used gun, and I couldn't get the residue off with anything. To begin with. After that first time, I honestly didn't try to get it off by hand anymore, just figured it weren't gonna happen.
trip286 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-17-2013, 10:14 AM   #7
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Jan 2011
Location: Jacksonville,FL
Posts: 2,823
Liked 1768 Times on 989 Posts
Likes Given: 1302

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mouser View Post
I have numerous SS guns and love to shoot them. I do not love to clean the powder residue off of them....generally, I use standard cleaning supplies like solvent, gun oil and lots of elbow grease...

What do you use and is there a "miracle" solvent that takes the residue off easily?
On the flash marks on the cylinder face I have used mag wheel cleaner applied with a Q-tip with good results. I wish I could remember where I read about it so I could link you to the article, but you basically want to do just the flash marks. Don't soak the whole cylinder. Let it sit until it dries, reapply, then wipe it off before it dries again.

Another method I have seen is Jewelers Rouge and a soft cotton cloth. This is the same stuff they use to polish precious metals, and they swear it doesn't remove metal. I don't have the patience to try it, so I can't tell you anything from a personal viewpoint.
Doc3402 is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2013, 02:02 AM   #8
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Feb 2010
Posts: 608
Liked 206 Times on 137 Posts

Default

Jeweler's rouge certainly removes metal. Cardboard is abrasive. Lead removal cloths are abrasive. Non-abrasive Flitz polish is-yes, abrasive.
Powder marks on the cylinder are best left alone. They will be back the next time you shoot the gun anyway.
BillDeShivs is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-19-2013, 02:17 AM   #9
FTF_SUPPORTER.png
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Mercator's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2013
Posts: 9,213
Liked 4684 Times on 3157 Posts
Likes Given: 2366

Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by JTJ View Post
The lead removal cloth does a good job.
I second that. If you try be sure it's real dense lead cloth like Kleenbore. There are soft rags sold as l.c. They r worthless.

Unfortunately solvents don't do a good job which is which is a good reason to avoid brushed stainless slides. The crap seems to embed in the rough surface.

I have seen good results with Carbon Killer 2000.
Mercator is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Old 11-26-2013, 04:51 AM   #10
Feedback Score: 0 reviews
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 6,624
Liked 2220 Times on 1525 Posts
Likes Given: 820

Default

CLP powder blast does a good job of cleaning my stainless guns. I bought my 10/22 used. Powder blast got stains off it that were there when I bought it.
John_Deer is offline  
 
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Firearms Forum Replies Last Post
Stainless Steel Touch-Up starving030 Engraving & Refinishing 2 03-05-2013 11:10 PM
Powder Marks on case DukesDad Ammunition & Reloading 12 07-20-2012 07:28 PM
Stainless steel GATOR101 Engraving & Refinishing 2 12-02-2011 06:13 PM
Stainless steel media Missouribound Ammunition & Reloading 6 05-02-2011 05:29 PM
Forged Steel or Stainless Steel? TailDragger XD Forum 4 02-05-2011 05:02 PM



Newest Threads