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-   -   Powder marks and Stainless Steel (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f168/powder-marks-stainless-steel-100392/)

Mouser 11-16-2013 02:09 AM

Powder marks and Stainless Steel
 
I have numerous SS guns and love to shoot them. I do not love to clean the powder residue off of them....generally, I use standard cleaning supplies like solvent, gun oil and lots of elbow grease...

What do you use and is there a "miracle" solvent that takes the residue off easily?

JTJ 11-16-2013 04:25 PM

The lead removal cloth does a good job.

trip286 11-16-2013 05:00 PM

Don't know what kind of guns you're shooting, but something I did with a stainless steel revolver...

The powder rings on the front of the cylinder! Gawd they're ugly. I cut a small disc out of a corrugated cardboard box and slapped it on a dremel. Using a very light touch and low RPMs, those powder rings buffed right off. I wouldn't think this would erode enough material to be a concern, as I did this enough to use up around 30 cardboard discs and the VERY fine machining marks still weren't even buffed out.

clr8ter 11-16-2013 05:55 PM

Quote:

as I did this enough to use up around 30 cardboard discs and the VERY fine machining marks still weren't even buffed out.
Was that in one cleaning, or over a bunch of cleanings? Don't they make specific powder residue solvents? I have 2 SS rifles, and the muzzle gets residue on it. I used a Rem Oil cloth, and it came off pretty easily, and that was after it had been there a while.

nitestalker 11-16-2013 06:02 PM

The chamber mouth mating to the forcing cone is very critical. Using even light abrasives on a Dremel tool will result in uneven wear across the 6 chambers. This will increase the gas cutting of barrel throat over time.:(
I would use one of the powder and lead solvents.:)

trip286 11-16-2013 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by clr8ter (Post 1433166)

Was that in one cleaning, or over a bunch of cleanings? Don't they make specific powder residue solvents? I have 2 SS rifles, and the muzzle gets residue on it. I used a Rem Oil cloth, and it came off pretty easily, and that was after it had been there a while.

That was after about two years of cleanings. And if you have a dremel laying around, and cardboard, you're not buying anything. I forget though, not many people stay as broke as me.

This was on a used gun, and I couldn't get the residue off with anything. To begin with. After that first time, I honestly didn't try to get it off by hand anymore, just figured it weren't gonna happen.

Doc3402 11-17-2013 10:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mouser (Post 1432752)
I have numerous SS guns and love to shoot them. I do not love to clean the powder residue off of them....generally, I use standard cleaning supplies like solvent, gun oil and lots of elbow grease...

What do you use and is there a "miracle" solvent that takes the residue off easily?

On the flash marks on the cylinder face I have used mag wheel cleaner applied with a Q-tip with good results. I wish I could remember where I read about it so I could link you to the article, but you basically want to do just the flash marks. Don't soak the whole cylinder. Let it sit until it dries, reapply, then wipe it off before it dries again.

Another method I have seen is Jewelers Rouge and a soft cotton cloth. This is the same stuff they use to polish precious metals, and they swear it doesn't remove metal. I don't have the patience to try it, so I can't tell you anything from a personal viewpoint.

BillDeShivs 11-19-2013 02:02 AM

Jeweler's rouge certainly removes metal. Cardboard is abrasive. Lead removal cloths are abrasive. Non-abrasive Flitz polish is-yes, abrasive.
Powder marks on the cylinder are best left alone. They will be back the next time you shoot the gun anyway.

Mercator 11-19-2013 02:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JTJ (Post 1433111)
The lead removal cloth does a good job.

I second that. If you try be sure it's real dense lead cloth like Kleenbore. There are soft rags sold as l.c. They r worthless.

Unfortunately solvents don't do a good job which is which is a good reason to avoid brushed stainless slides. The crap seems to embed in the rough surface.

I have seen good results with Carbon Killer 2000.

John_Deer 11-26-2013 04:51 AM

CLP powder blast does a good job of cleaning my stainless guns. I bought my 10/22 used. Powder blast got stains off it that were there when I bought it.


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