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Old 11-15-2012, 06:02 AM   #31
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Over the years, Ubertis varied quite a bit in quality and QC---the later production is miles ahead of their earlier guns. One word of advice---don't dry-fire them or you'll soon be paying a gunsmith to fit a new Colt made firing pin!
Enjoy your new toy.

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Old 11-15-2012, 07:18 AM   #32
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I own only one Colt clone the Cimarron Bisley Flat Top Target 44-40. Uberti and Cimarron are one of the same and I couldn't be more pleased with it for 10 years. The finish and action are excellent and this one is a tack driver.

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Old 11-16-2012, 12:50 AM   #33
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I started shooting SASS in 2000 and the Italian imports had problems. The pawls, the bolt stop, the trigger stirrups were not tempered enough or the metal was incorrect. They were always wearing and/or breaking. The music wire trigger return/bolt springs were selling great. Replacement parts were annealed.

I owned a pair of Western Arms (EMF) that had the stirrups and pawls replaced. Once parts were replaced and polished they ran fine.

Beretta purhased Uberti around 2001-2002 and the quality after this period is much better.

Be aware that all(most) all distributors that sale the 1873 winchester repro (and others) are made by Uberti/Beretta. Chaparral makes them but you don't want them.

Armi San Marco and Pietta make reproductions. I have zero experience with them.

I started with Colts 3rd gen. Never had a problem with them. They were light hammered, light triggered, and very very smooth.

Around 2003, i bought a pair of Ruger Blackhawk 3 screws that had been owned by Cody Conagher and then Lone Dude (aliases). Outstanding gunsmiths. For the next nine years of thousands and thousands of rounds through them, the only thing I have replaced is one (1) trigger return spring. Looks like the one behind a 10-22 trigger. They are little tanks. They are the size of Colts and act like Colts. Four clicks and half cock to spin.

And you would be surprised to see the reasonable price they bring.

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Old 11-16-2012, 03:48 AM   #34
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jyo View Post
Over the years, Ubertis varied quite a bit in quality and QC---the later production is miles ahead of their earlier guns. One word of advice---don't dry-fire them or you'll soon be paying a gunsmith to fit a new Colt made firing pin!
Enjoy your new toy.
Agreed. They have the firing pin on the hammer and it can break if dry fired. I stated this earlier, but most disagreed.
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Old 11-16-2012, 02:38 PM   #35
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Not being super familiar with Uberti firearms for a while, I need to get something straightened out.

If a single action has a base pin hammer block (as did my Great Westerns), you engaged this block by going to half cock and pushing in the base pin to the second notch manually. This blocked the full travel of the hammer and stopped the firing pin contact with the primer.

I am not aware of any other type of "safety" on a single action save the transfer bar or utilizing the notches in the hammer. If you have a Ruger, you can feel the transfer bar "catch" if you pull the trigger with the hammer down. The transfer bar is trying to place itself between the hammer and the firing pin to facilitate firing. It is contacting the first ledge on the hammer. Some of us make this a smooth angle cause we hate that "catch". The transfer bar will only be activated if someone pulls the trigger.

Here is an animation of an S&W. You can see the hammer block being pulled away from the hammer.

http://www.genitron.com/Basics/Interactive-Revolver

I am not aware of any automatic safety contained in a single action.

Please expand the following description. Please identify the model with the auto safety.
"The one on the right has the base pin safety.

"This safety is automatically engaged when the hammer is placed in the first notch. The trigger sear engages a lever which pivots this block down, impinging between the frame and the hammer, similar to that used on older Colts as the Colt Positive safety. It is automatic and automatically disengaged."

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Old 11-16-2012, 05:34 PM   #36
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I will try to explain this the best I can. I had a Uberti Cattleman .44 Magnum (ca. 1975) that had this type of safety, and this is on a Uberti Flat Top .45 Colt I bought more recently. Here is the hmmer in close-up:



The wedge of metal below the firing pin rotates around the pin visible on the hammer, and is spring loaded. When the hammer is drawn back to the first notch (the safety notch, the hammer being raised only a slight amount) the tip of the trigger, the sear, engages a lever in the hammer that pivots this wedge downward, so that is impinges between the hammer and frame of the revolver. So engaged, this block prevents any forward movement of the hammer, even if struck or dropped, thus is a hammer block. Skeeter Skelton once remarked he used a hammer handle trying to make a gun fire with this engaged and a loaded round under the hammer. The gun did not fire.

Yet, so engaged, a loaded revovler can be fired by merely earing back the hammer and pressing the trigger in normal single action firing.

As I've pointed out, some Ubertis have this safety device, others use the base pin "Swiss Safe" system.

Look up Uberti parts on Numrich's (Gun Parts Corp) site and the schematic, and parts list the hammer with or without the safety.

Red Cent:

Quote:
If a single action has a base pin hammer block (as did my Great Westerns), you engaged this block by going to half cock and pushing in the base pin to the second notch manually. This blocked the full travel of the hammer and stopped the firing pin contact with the primer.
This is the "Swiss Safe" system, developed by Hammerli for their Virginian imported by Interarms. Note this is a different revolver than the Virginan Dragoon.

http://www.gunpartscorp.com/Manufacturers/Uberti-33543/Revolvers-42389/1873SingleActionCattleman-37956.htm

Bob Wright
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Old 11-16-2012, 07:03 PM   #37
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That is a new one for me. Kinda before my cowboy time, but hey, it took 71 years to learn this.
So we have the various hammer blocks and we have transfer bars. The transfer bar seems to be universal while hammer blocks come in all shapes.

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Old 11-16-2012, 11:04 PM   #38
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Some Ubertis have hammer blocks, some don't. SASS requires loading five with hammer on an empty rounds for all SAs. The lore said cowboys carried a rolled up five dollar bill in the sixth position to pay for their funeral. Anyway if there is nothing between the hammer point and the primer a drop could definitely make it go off. Be safe, load one skip one and put the hammer down on an empty......doc

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Old 11-17-2012, 01:06 AM   #39
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Wright View Post
Depending on the Uberti you have. Best advice, carry an empty chamber under the hammer, I even do that with my New Model Rugers.




Again, best practice is to keep an empty chamber under the hammer.

Bob Wright
As I said at first.

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Old 11-22-2012, 01:05 AM   #40
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Fwiw, my uberti 1873 I bought this year has both. But i still load one, skip one when I keep it loaded for home defense.

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