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Old 11-04-2012, 04:03 AM   #21
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Guns with the firing pin on the hammer can be damaged with a dry fire on an empty chamber.
Why the confusion? The Snap Cap is red, does not look at all like a brass cartridge.

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Old 11-04-2012, 12:10 PM   #22
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Originally Posted by tomingreeneco View Post
Guns with the firing pin on the hammer can be damaged with a dry fire on an empty chamber.
Why the confusion? The Snap Cap is red, does not look at all like a brass cartridge.
Well, guess your stuck on your thoughts & ways so be it
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Old 11-04-2012, 01:56 PM   #23
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I own a Uberti El Patron in .45 Caliber. As I've understood it, the Taylor's Smoke Wagon is essentially the same Revolver, but the Smoke Wagon is usually a bit more money.

It is said that while there have been various companies that Uberti has imported to over the years, such as Navy Arms, Cimarron, and such, these companies supposedly have a degree of QC ability to determine the degree of quality the parts are. Taylor's was said to be the best currently.

Still not sure in a side by side comparo if any differences of QC, fit and finish, or reliability-accuracy would actually be noted between the the Smoke Wagon, and El Patron? Both are said to use American made Wolff Springs throughout.

About the only couple little things I didn't like with the El Patron, is some sort of Silk Screened Name on the Barrel, and Silk Screened Numbering on the Cylinder, and wondering how long such will hold up before beginning to wear off?

I would've personally preferred just a stamped, or rolled engraving on the Barrel myself.

The other thing I immediately didn't like on the Uberti, was the Base Pin (Cylinder Pin as some of you might call it) The stock Base Pin, while not actually poor in quality, has some government mandated two notch affair, as a means of letting a user disable the function of the Hammer fully dropping on a Cartridge, thus "supposedly" making the gun safer. As all know, no firearm is actually safe, if an end user doesn't properly know how to use it, and also doesn't practice proper safe gun handling.

The option for getting away from the stock Base Pin I found was Belt Mountain. The Belt Mountain Base Pin is a extremely high quality part, only has one small groove ground into the pin, thus permitting better fit-contact within the front of the Reciever Frame, and the Belt Mountain Pin also has a slightly larger front Knob Flange, which fits against the Ejection Rod Housing, and restricts movement of rotation of the Base Pin within the Reciever.

I had found my Belt Mountain Base Pin was perfectly machined to even better tolerances than the stock Uberti Base Pin, giving a better more solid fit, with the Cylinder feeling more solid with a much less degree of slop-play. The Belt Mountain Base Pin was also perfectly Blued, and also matches the Gun perfectly, so there's no issues of sub-par cosmetic looks.

At $24.95 for the Base Pin, it was a very worthy purchase IMO.

If memory serves me correctly, the proper size for the Uberti Clones is .2495". This new Pin fit with NASA like precision, and no sanding of the Pin, or any other modifcations are needed.

I believe they are also available in Stainless Steel, and as well make Base Pins for many of the Rugers, and as well Colts.

I have no affiliation with Belt Mountain, just a very satisfied customer.

One last little tip with your Uberti (or Colt), is if you wish to keep those nasty rotational cylinder scratches from quickly occuring, never drop the Hammer from 1/2 cock after loading. Always take the Gun to Full Cock, then carefully, and safely slowly drop the Hammer (Preferably with these on an Empty Chamber). As always, with any firearm, also insure you are ALWAYS pointing a Firearm in a safe direction when loading-unloading, and fiddling with a Hammer! Mark

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Old 11-05-2012, 03:12 AM   #24
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Quote:
Markd51:
The other thing I immediately didn't like on the Uberti, was the Base Pin (Cylinder Pin as some of you might call it) The stock Base Pin, while not actually poor in quality, has some government mandated two notch affair, as a means of letting a user disable the function of the Hammer fully dropping on a Cartridge, thus "supposedly" making the gun safer. As all know, no firearm is actually safe, if an end user doesn't properly know how to use it, and also doesn't practice proper safe gun handling.
I'm not too sure about the price difference between Uberti replacement parts and Belt Mountain, but there is a standard base pin with the one groove that is a replacement part from Uberti. These available from Brownell's. They also offer a hammer without the safety (for about $70) to replace those on Ubertis that have the hammer block safety.

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Old 11-05-2012, 03:17 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomingreeneco View Post
Guns with the firing pin on the hammer can be damaged with a dry fire on an empty chamber.
Don't wish to start an argument with you, but have dry-fired my guns many thousands of times over the last fifty years with no damage as a result. These include Colt New Service, Colt Officers Models, Single Action Armys, and Bisleys. Also Smith & Wessons both K-, and N- framed revovlers. And many Iver Johnsons and unmarked revovlers.

I have yet to see any damage from such practice.

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Old 11-09-2012, 03:02 PM   #26
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Don't wish to start an argument with you, but have dry-fired my guns many thousands of times over the last fifty years with no damage as a result. These include Colt New Service, Colt Officers Models, Single Action Armys, and Bisleys. Also Smith & Wessons both K-, and N- framed revovlers. And many Iver Johnsons and unmarked revovlers.

I have yet to see any damage from such practice.

Bob Wright
I agree and I have dry fired my guns thousands of times, but old old habits/myths are hard to let go of for lots of folks.
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Old 11-10-2012, 11:12 PM   #27
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Just to sort things out, there is a difference between a hammer block and a transfer bar. The ruger single actions have a transfer bar. When the trigger is pulled it raises a bar between the hammer and the firing pin. when the hammer hits the transfer bar, the bar transfers the energy to the firing pin. The revolver would not fire without it.
The Smith & Wesson double action revolvers have the hammer block. The hammer block is to prevent firing if dropped or other events that may cause the hammer to go forward without pulling the trigger.. The S&W will fire without the hammer block. If allowed, competitors usually remove the hammer block.
The Ruger with the floating firing pin can endure dry firing forever. However, I have broke two transfer bars by dry firing. I finally removed them, had the hammers welded and shaped, added a half cock and forgot about it.
Colt firing pins are located in the hammer and fire the revolver by means of hole in the receiver and recoil shield. When the revolver is fired, that hammer and firing pin is hitting steel. This, sometimes, causes the firing pin to peen the hole and enlarge it at the opening. The breakage is usually the firing pin pin that goes through the hammer. That firing pin is actually a little loose in its pocket and that little pin takes a beating. If the hole is not large enough, the firing pin will break about 1/2 of its length. This is the repeated striking of the firing pin in this area against the hole.
I would suggest if your revolver has the firing pin in the hammer, use snap caps.
'course, YMMV

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Old 11-10-2012, 11:53 PM   #28
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I want to re-emphasize that some Ubertis have the hammer block safety, some don't. Those that don't have the "Swiss Safe" system.

Bob Wright

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Old 11-13-2012, 04:41 PM   #29
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I agree if you are referring to the cylinder/base pin hammer block.

Interesting note. My Dan Wesson uses a transfer bar. I am not aware of any other double action revolver that uses the transfer bar. 'Course, ignorance is bliss.

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Old 11-13-2012, 11:15 PM   #30
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The "Swiss Safe" is the cylinder/base pin block.

The Uberti hammer block is in the hammer and is activated when the hammer is placed in the "safety" notch.


It is the wedge of metal in the hammer at the left:



The one on the right has the base pin safety.

This safety is automatically engaged when the hammer is placed in the first notch. The trigger sear engages a lever which pivots this block down, impinging between the frame and the hammer, similar to that used on older Colts as the Colt Positive safety. It is automatic and automatically disengaged.

Both of these are Ubertis, by the way.

Bob Wright

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