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Old 04-18-2013, 03:30 PM   #11
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Great gun, and it's a shooter.
Just keep it clean and it'll probably always be worth more than you paid for it.
Check on the web about cleaning nickel guns. There are lots of things that can damage the finish.

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Old 04-18-2013, 05:11 PM   #12
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The 29-3 was the same gun as a 29-2 with the pinned barrel and recessed cylinder dropped to lower production cost They have a crush fit barrel. Later on in the 29-4 the better locking mechanism added and full under lug barrels.
Back in the hey day of silhouette shooting Ruger and Dan Wesson shooters could fire higher pressure loads than a smith and Wesson and the smith and Wesson shooters loaded there model 29 version mostly 29-2 models to maximum and over pressure loads to keep up.
After excessive firing of the max and over pressure loads. The locking mechanisms would some times unlock from the recoil and pressure and the cylinder would back spin.
You would fire a shot and the next one would fall back on the spent cartridge you just fired.
This was a problem that only happened with high pressure loads being fired in extreme amounts.But like any thing it became a point that to this day in the smith and Wesson forums I belong to is a question asked fairly often by people.
Under normal use the older guns will out last a few generations of owners.Any gun pushed past the pressures it was desighned for and done excessively will eventualy fail. Ruger and Dan Wesson revolvers are heavier and will take more pressures but exceed there recommended pressures al though above a smith and Wesson limits and you will get failures in those to.
The pinned a recessed smith and Wesson revolvers from 29-2 back are worth more to collect. The 29-2 was the longest running model and there fore is not rare but hold there value and increase. The dash three and later revolvers are not considered collector models
The model 29 came out in 1955 and was called a 44 magnum and in 1957 model numbers were given to all smith and wessons like the K frame combat magnum that also came out in 1955 was then called a model 19.
The changes smith and Wesson made to there revolvers over time after 1957 were followed with a dash. Some models like for instance the k-22 models were still pinned and recessed into the dash four models even though a few dash four models were not pinned and recessed. I have a 17-4 and a 48 dash four both pinned and recessed.
I prefer the pinned and recessed models and have a 6.5 barrel 29-2.

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Old 04-18-2013, 05:26 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onenut58 View Post
The 29-3 was the same gun as a 29-2 with the pinned barrel and recessed cylinder dropped to lower production cost They have a crush fit barrel. Later on in the 29-4 the better locking mechanism added and full under lug barrels.
Back in the hey day of silhouette shooting Ruger and Dan Wesson shooters could fire higher pressure loads than a smith and Wesson and the smith and Wesson shooters loaded there model 29 version mostly 29-2 models to maximum and over pressure loads to keep up.
After excessive firing of the max and over pressure loads. The locking mechanisms would some times unlock from the recoil and pressure and the cylinder would back spin.
You would fire a shot and the next one would fall back on the spent cartridge you just fired.
This was a problem that only happened with high pressure loads being fired in extreme amounts.But like any thing it became a point that to this day in the smith and Wesson forums I belong to is a question asked fairly often by people.
Under normal use the older guns will out last a few generations of owners.Any gun pushed past the pressures it was desighned for and done excessively will eventualy fail. Ruger and Dan Wesson revolvers are heavier and will take more pressures but exceed there recommended pressures al though above a smith and Wesson limits and you will get failures in those to.
The pinned a recessed smith and Wesson revolvers from 29-2 back are worth more to collect. The 29-2 was the longest running model and there fore is not rare but hold there value and increase. The dash three and later revolvers are not considered collector models
The model 29 came out in 1955 and was called a 44 magnum and in 1957 model numbers were given to all smith and wessons like the K frame combat magnum that also came out in 1955 was then called a model 19.
The changes smith and Wesson made to there revolvers over time after 1957 were followed with a dash. Some models like for instance the k-22 models were still pinned and recessed into the dash four models even though a few dash four models were not pinned and recessed. I have a 17-4 and a 48 dash four both pinned and recessed.
I prefer the pinned and recessed models and have a 6.5 barrel 29-2.
Thanks for a more detailed reply than just calling me "very misinformed"
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Old 04-19-2013, 11:53 AM   #14
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Thanks for a more detailed reply than just calling me "very misinformed"
You too are allowed to google then copy & paste it here
That sure didn't come off his keyboard---
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Old 04-19-2013, 03:06 PM   #15
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Thanks for the replies. At almost $1 a pop, I'll refrain from shooting it too often. Here are pics, as requested.

soccer-112.jpg   soccer-113.jpg  
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Old 04-20-2013, 12:10 PM   #16
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I was a very active Silhouette shooter in the 1970s. I was also a writer and contributor to the National News latter. Served as state director for Wyoming.
This BS about Mdl. 29s being more likely to fail etc is just another load of nonsense. The Ruger BH had problems with ejector rods falling off and the new rod safeties blocks falling in to the actions. Dan Wesson were racked with barrel spacing problems. Actions binding was a Dan Wesson on going failure.
The real facts are the S&W was more expensive than the other guns. Shooters who could not afford good equipment was always findings something "Just as Good". Some things never change.
The very idea that dropping pinned barrels was an improvement is so ridiculous I won even reply.

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Old 04-20-2013, 04:04 PM   #17
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I would like to reply to a comment made by hossfly as to my post being googled and copied. I assure my reply came from my keyboard and from my head. He is correct in the fact what I know about smith and wessons did come partialy from reading for many many years about the history of smith and wessons as well as being a member of the smith and wesson forums.
If you got to smith and wesson forums asking questions there is a chance I may be one of the people replying to your questions.I am listed there under the same handle since 2009.
The question on the dash three model in this thread basicly was asking about the value of the gun.
There were a number of replies like it being a later beefed up model etc.
The gun was made years before the new locking mechanisms and deeper cuts in the cylinder locking lugs were cut.As I said the gun is basicly the same gun as a dash two. It just does not have the threaded and pinned barrel or the recessed cylinder. The internal mechanisms are the same as a dash two.
The dash two models as I said are the most common of all the model 29 versions the no dash five screw pre29 versions made before 1957 are the most prized but the dash one models only made a year are the most rare.The early three screw 29-2 versions with the beginning serial numbers starting with a S are more sought after valuable collectable than the N series serial numbers. Being as they were made before the bangor models
Any thing I said in my previous post and this one is common knowledge to novice collectors in the smith and wesson forum and very old news to any one collecting smith and wessons.
Any one who collects smith and wessons commonly owns a catalogue written by Jim Suppica and available for around 30 bucks at book stores that is the bible for smith and wessons.
It covers the basic knowledge like in this thread but also full details on all smith and wessons ever made with serial number blocks of manufacture and changes etc over the many years and many models of smith and wessons.
I don't google any thing if I need to know any thing about a smith and wesson.Any collector has studied the catalogue and don't need to refer to it for simple basic common knowledge issues like in this thread.
The cylinder locks releasing and back spinning to the previous chamber is also common knowledge and a issue often asked about in the smith and wesson forums.
If you go there and ask about how old your gun is most members out of there head can tell you a approximate date but will grab there catalogue and look up your serial number to narrow it down.
Another common question there is about K frame 357 magnums being weak and dangerous.It does get old answering newbies to smith and wessons questions over and over again.
But many of us in the smith and wesson forums recall when we were looking for imformation and take the time to reply.
There is a lot of people who believe a model 29 or a model 19 smith and wesson is a weak gun from the rumors spread in many forums especialy the ruger forum about these two models.
So the questions come ever so often and have been answered many times over.
The model 19 and its variants the fix sight heavy barrel model 13 and stainless models 66 and fixed sight stainless model 65 in the past were very commonly carried by law enforcement before bottom feeders took over.
These guns under heavy use firing thousands of rounds would shake loose over time.So smith and wesson dropped them and made the model 586 and 686 L frames but to late for law enforcement who were moving to bottom feeders.
The rumor is it is not safe to fire 357 magnum regularly through a K frame. This is untrue just like a model 29 will back spin on who ever owns it.
If you have enough money to fire thousands of rounds of 357 magnum per year through your K frame 357 like cops used to do for free through there departments you may experience your K frame loosening up.
If you sit down and reload high pressure hot loads exceeding recommended max pressures and fire excessive amounts through your older model 29 you may get your gun to back spin.
Other wise any thing else your told is a untrue.If you don't believe me I suggest you go to smith and wesson forums and post the question where you will recive replies from the huge member ship of ex and current law enforcement and silhouette shooters who will tell you the same common knowledge I just did.
I also assure you they like me have no need nor will not google up any thing.
The issue of the locks and mim parts is argued among the members there.Many members own both modern and old smiths and some own one or the other.But the guns of the nineties up with these things have proven to be very durable accurate guns.
I personaly do not own any that are not pinned and recessed and prefer models that go back from there.Many collectors look down on dash models especialy dash two because of the massive amounts of them made for so long and not being rare or hard to find.
Some will not own a bangor gun with the N serials and on and on.Many stick just to the five and four screw models.
But as a rule the older the guns the more rare and more valuable.
In recent years the shorter the barrel the more valuable the gun in N frames magnums. Four inch barrels on model 29 versions and 3.5 on model 27 versions bring the most and are more sought after.
I personly prefer the 6 to 6.5 barrel lengths because of where I live and what my N frame magnums are used for.

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Old 05-12-2013, 06:49 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onenut58 View Post
The 29-3 was the same gun as a 29-2 with the pinned barrel and recessed cylinder dropped to lower production cost They have a crush fit barrel. Later on in the 29-4 the better locking mechanism added and full under lug barrels.
Back in the hey day of silhouette shooting Ruger and Dan Wesson shooters could fire higher pressure loads than a smith and Wesson and the smith and Wesson shooters loaded there model 29 version mostly 29-2 models to maximum and over pressure loads to keep up.
After excessive firing of the max and over pressure loads. The locking mechanisms would some times unlock from the recoil and pressure and the cylinder would back spin.
You would fire a shot and the next one would fall back on the spent cartridge you just fired.
This was a problem that only happened with high pressure loads being fired in extreme amounts.But like any thing it became a point that to this day in the smith and Wesson forums I belong to is a question asked fairly often by people.
Under normal use the older guns will out last a few generations of owners.Any gun pushed past the pressures it was desighned for and done excessively will eventualy fail. Ruger and Dan Wesson revolvers are heavier and will take more pressures but exceed there recommended pressures al though above a smith and Wesson limits and you will get failures in those to.
The pinned a recessed smith and Wesson revolvers from 29-2 back are worth more to collect. The 29-2 was the longest running model and there fore is not rare but hold there value and increase. The dash three and later revolvers are not considered collector models
The model 29 came out in 1955 and was called a 44 magnum and in 1957 model numbers were given to all smith and wessons like the K frame combat magnum that also came out in 1955 was then called a model 19.
The changes smith and Wesson made to there revolvers over time after 1957 were followed with a dash. Some models like for instance the k-22 models were still pinned and recessed into the dash four models even though a few dash four models were not pinned and recessed. I have a 17-4 and a 48 dash four both pinned and recessed.
I prefer the pinned and recessed models and have a 6.5 barrel 29-2.
My 19-3 still has the pinned barrel and recessed cylinder.
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Old 05-13-2013, 11:21 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by onenut58 View Post
The 29-3 was the same gun as a 29-2 with the pinned barrel and recessed cylinder dropped to lower production cost They have a crush fit barrel. Later on in the 29-4 the better locking mechanism added and full under lug barrels.
.
Thats like saying the 2000 Ford & 2001 Ford are the same but in 2001 they only put 3 brake pads on instead of 4
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