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Old 02-16-2012, 02:37 AM   #11
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I had an old Ruger flattop with a 6 or 6" 3/4" I don't recall for certain but it was in my younger days when it was unacceptable to admit shooting it hurt like hell!
I always used a heavy leather glove when shooting it and had to "BOB" the hammer because it bit the shooter every time! The Super Blackhawk and Redhawk are ***** cats by comparison.

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Old 02-16-2012, 05:05 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SingleLiberty24
Am 14 years old and weight 80-90 pounds and I want to shoot a 44. Mag anything I need to know
I've shot .44's for years and hunt deer with a Colt 8" Anaconda. I've a 4" and 6" S&W Mdl 29 in .44. I have a 4 3/4" ( or whatever) flattop Ruger single action revolver. I shoot them all. I've shot a Desert Eagle .50ae quite a lot. I practice trigger control with small calibre finely triggered guns.

Shoot the .44.
Lets assume you shoot right handed.
Hold the revolver solidly without squeezing hard with your right hand high on the grip. Keep you first finger straight, put your thumb down towards your middle finger.
Place your left hand over your right hand with your left index finger over your right middle finger and the other fingers on down. If you have hands larger than the grip, use your left pinkie under the butt of the revolver. It does help. Solidly place your left thumb over your right thumb pointing down.

You'll use the left thumb to cock the revolver which means you don't have to change your grip. Try this hold this way and that until its comfortable. This is the best grip I know to shoot a double action revolver in single or double action.

At the range with your left foot slightly forward, grip the revolver bring it up, wrap your off hand around. Push with your right arm, drop the left elbow and pull backwards. Cock the revolver. Front sight on target, squeeze.

Double action: same, front sight on target, pull through the trigger as quickly or slowly as you need. Just don't stop pulling the trigger until the fire.

To begin, I'd just let the gun recoil without trying to hold it down during recoil. The bullet will be out of the barrel before the recoil moves the point of aim. As you get more proficient, you'll want to hold harder and down for second shots. Just hold onto the revolver and let it kick up. It isn't particularly punishing if you follow the recoil with your hands.

Stopping the trigger pull at one or two points in the travel is called "staging the trigger." I should getta bunch a crap from folks that like to stage triggers.

One thing I've done with more than one weapon is to shoot several rounds at a small target like a 55 gallon drum at ten steps just to alleviate any qualms I had about the gun.

Luck with it.

Relax, front sight, squeeze, enjoy.
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Old 02-16-2012, 07:20 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CubDriver451 View Post
Actually, R. Lee Ermey was a a Marine for 11 years before receiving a medical discharge. Although he is a combat verteran, I have never seen any indication that he is an accomplished shooter, let alone one that has experience with heavily recoiling handguns. Judging by the fact that his left hand came completely off of the grip, and the way the gun recoiled, I would guess that he has either never shot truly powerful handguns, or that he was putting on a bit of a show for the camera. Either way, it is not representative of the level of recoil and it's effect on the shooter when proper shooting techniques are employed.

My nephew has been shooting since he was quite young, has been taught how to properly position his body and how to grip the gun to dissipate recoil. He is now 16 years old, and not above average in size, but has shot many heavy recoiling handguns for several years. Get some good instruction and start with milder loads before trying the heavy hitters. Dealing with recoil is learned, and it has little to do with physical size or strength.

JW
This is what I was talking about when I referred to being prepared for the recoil. I had some trouble shooting my Super Blackhawk at first but I have had it for a while and now am quite comfortable using it.
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Old 02-20-2012, 03:28 AM   #14
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Default You can do this.

Single Liberty,

Do not shoot a .44 Magnum seated at a bench for the first time. Being seated tends to increase perceived recoil because your body can't move with it.

Stand erect, feet apart about shoulder width. Revolver out in front of you, two hand grip, strong hand first and then support hand wrapped around strong hand. Lock your elbows somewhat so your arms move at the shoulders. If your elbows bend too much, you'll bash yourself on the upper forehead with the front sight. Try to avoid that. Just go ahead and yank the first shot off and don't worry about hitting anything - being safe where the round goes, of course. If nothing else get it into the ground at least 10 feet in front of you. (Depends on your range and backstop.) Once you've cranked off that first round, you'll either unload the gun and put it back, or you'll smile and say, "Not as bad as they told me. I can do this."

Rhett Butler's ideas are sound as well. Just make sure you don't bash the front of your head.
And he's right about the double action trigger pull as well. Watch the sights and pull the trigger straight through.

Always wear some sort of eye protection. If you wear regular glasses as I do, you'll want something to protect your glasses as well.

Wear hearing protection. I do not exaggerate when I suggest you use ear plugs under shooting muffs. I find the report level much more painful and offensive than the physical recoil in my hands. Not to mention acoustic trauma (loud noise on your ears) can deafen you without too much trying.

But go for it.

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Old 02-20-2012, 03:47 AM   #15
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my youngest is 13. he has been shooting my 629 since he was 8 or 9. i started him with special loads. he has been shooting full power 270-320gr reloads the last couple of years. he shoots standing 2 hand. he does not have any problems. heck, my son in-law just bought a s&w 4" 500 mag. when they brought it out to shoot the youngest wanted to be the first. he sorta got staggered back when he fired that first 440gr round but he fired several more. now he wants me to buy one for us. have someone with some experience show you how and then have fun.

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Old 02-21-2012, 12:29 AM   #16
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For goodness sakes always wear hearing protection when
shooting any firearm especially magnums.

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Old 02-21-2012, 04:24 PM   #17
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When I first got my Super Blackhawk in .44 mag I was telling a guy I know about how much it kicked. He started telling me about how his Taurus revolver in .44 mag didn't kick much, as if he were trying to say the gun made the difference. He is one of those shooters who uses wimpy, powder puff loads in all of his guns because he wants to shoot as cheap as possible. He has his .44 mag loads down to about 850 fps. I told him I would like to see him shoot his Taurus using one of my loads, which is a Hornady 240-grain XTP coming out of the barrel at 1300 fps. I said I would like to see the look on his face when he pulled the trigger. He declined my offer.

I am not afraid of recoil; if I was I wouldn't be shooting a .44 mag. I would stick with something like a .22 or 9mm if recoil made me nervous. I wanted a .44 mag for the power it offered. I think the important thing is to learn proper handgun handling and recoil management techniques.

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Old 02-24-2012, 06:01 AM   #18
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I'm about 5'6" 140lbs I've been shooting for about 12 years. But I've only recently shot a .357 mag and it feels like getting a dissent slap in the hand. I've heard the .44 mag is twice as strong a kick, and I would probably be the kind of person who would shoot it once unload it an be done. I now only shoot .38 sp for fun and have mag loads for home defence. I enjoy the light kick of a 9mm, but shooting a .357 mag hurts me enough that I can't hit crap because I flinch. I can shoot a shotgun all day. My advice is to rent one or find a friend with one before you buy one.

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Old 02-24-2012, 01:29 PM   #19
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When I fired my .44 mag the first time the recoil really got my attention in a big way, like a hard kick in the groin might. I was thinking, "What have I done? Why did I buy this pistol?" After that I learned how to properly handle my gun and manage the recoil. I now enjoy shooting it and actually get the best accuracy with it out of all my handguns that includes, .45acp, .357 mag and 9mm.

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Old 02-24-2012, 07:21 PM   #20
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I have a S&W model 629 (stainless steel .44 Mag if you are not up on Smith modeling) 4". I bought it "used" at the local LE gun shop fro $299. It had been fired exactly 6 times by the previous owner. He even brought back the box of six empties and 14 live rounds from the box of 20 he bought with the gun. I do not find it unpleasant to shoot at all, but I have 5 big Magnum revolvers and am used to it

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