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-   -   .327 mag (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f16/327-mag-74013/)

Eturnsdale 10-09-2012 04:35 PM

.327 mag
 
One of our friends finally woke up and has gotten interested in shooting. One of those stories where the liberal gets out on the range fires a .22 and loves it kinda things.

Well, She'd been researching and researching trying to find a carry gun, and this morning when I was in town I stopped by and she asked me about a .327. But as Ive never fired one I really couldn't answer her questions.

How is it on recoil compared to a .38 spc? From what Ive read its recoil is less than that of a .357 mag, but higher than a .32 H&R. From looking at the muzzel energies it looks like it would be harder to handle than a .38 but I wasn't sure so I thought I would ask here.

I am a firm believer that mostly any adult woman can learn to reliably handle most any firearm. But I wouldn't want to push her too quickly.

JonM 10-09-2012 05:39 PM

Gun weight has more to do with felt recoil than anything else. A 6" ruger gp100 will have less felt recoil shooting 158 grain +p+ than a s&w featherweight shooting reduced load 38spl.

As for 327 unless you got deep pockets or like to reload its not a good round to shoot a lot. Pretty pricey and not commonly found in any quantity.

I would recomend a full size revolver chambered in 357 mag (can use 38 special) or an xdm in 9mm. My wife likes the xdm its simple easy to use no safeties or controls to worry about. She doesnt like revolvers with that long trigger pull or having to cock it for each shot.

I would suggest taking her to a range that rents guns and try out a wide variety. Picking a gun for someone is rarely if ever a good idea.

Eturnsdale 10-09-2012 06:04 PM

Thanks for the input. And you're correct. But I am just trying to answer her question on recoil difference between the .327 and .38. The ones she is looking at are of similar weight and barrel length.

JonM 10-09-2012 06:22 PM

Similar guns... then lighter weight bullet tends to recoil less on percieved recoil. Grip design and how it fits the hand also plays a factor. For example just switching the soft rubber pachmyer grips off my colt python and putting wood grips in their place increases felt recoil.

Thats why test firing rental guns is sooooo important.

A good way to compair is mass and velocity newtonian equation (i dont have the exact syntax in memmory) so you can get an idea of compairing two different chamberings in the same gun.

Eturnsdale 10-09-2012 06:33 PM

Let me break it down a little simpler.

110 gr .327 mag 1400 ft/sec 435 ft.lbs
110 gr .38 spc 980 ft/sec 235 ft.lbs

By the numbers alone, given similar weighted pistols, one would expect the .327 mag to have more perceived recoil. However.

115 gr 9mm 1300 ft/sec 420 ft.lbs
230 gr .45 900 ft/sec 415 ft.lbs

So we know that does not relate directly to perceived recoil. Hence my question.

phildenton 10-09-2012 06:49 PM

Thats where the grip material, fit to hand, barrel length and weight of gun come into play.

JonM 10-09-2012 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Eturnsdale (Post 970162)
Let me break it down a little simpler.

110 gr .327 mag 1400 ft/sec 435 ft.lbs
110 gr .38 spc 980 ft/sec 235 ft.lbs

By the numbers alone, given similar weighted pistols, one would expect the .327 mag to have more perceived recoil. However.

115 gr 9mm 1300 ft/sec 420 ft.lbs
230 gr .45 900 ft/sec 415 ft.lbs

So we know that does not relate directly to perceived recoil. Hence my question.

Couple KE=1/2*M*V*V with newton's law of equal and opposite reactions. An exact duplicate weighted gun gun design grip etc the 9mm will have slightly more felt recoil than the 45. But you also have a few other factors like rotational torque and initial inertia to deal with. It takes more effort to get a bigger object down a tube than a smaller one. But with the basic energy mass stuff it just gives a good guildline on where to start looking in terms of felt recoil.

Quote:

Originally Posted by phildenton (Post 970184)
Thats where the grip material, fit to hand, barrel length and weight of gun come into play.

What phildenton said there applies more than newtonian laws to percieved recoil than anything.

A .5 grain lighter bullet in whatever size going the exact same speed out of gun than its bigger brother will have more felt recoil but you prolly wont be able to tell the difference.

Ive had folks shoot my xdm in 45 acp and my wife's xdm in 9mm and say my 45 was more pleasent because it has a gentler shove rather than a sharp snap of the 9mm. Felt recoil is a very personal and individual thing that doesnt translate well from person to person.

spittinfire 10-09-2012 08:17 PM

I personally would not get involved with the 327, especially for a new shooter. It's harder to find, much more expensive and answers a question that was never asked.

I would highly recommend her looking into a 38 Special or a 357 Magnum long before a 327. The reason I suggest a 357 is that it is capable of shooting 38s but offers the ability to step up to a more powerful round as she feels comfortable. The 38 Special has a long history of being an adequate self defense round and offering mild recoil. It is also available in a HUGE selection of firearms so you should be able find something she is comfortable with.
IMHO, I would direct her to a 4” 6 shot 357 and start her with 38s. That is the best all around use revolver available. It offers some concealability should she want to but most of all it will be forgiving for her to learn on, accurate and reliable. A great, inexpensive gun would be a Ruger GP100.

hiwall 10-09-2012 11:10 PM

While the 38 spl/357 would be my first choice, the 327 would not be bad. you could shoot 32 shorts, 32 longs, 32 H&R, and 327's in it. In the same size gun it has one more round then the 38/357 usually.

spittinfire 10-10-2012 02:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hiwall (Post 970576)
While the 38 spl/357 would be my first choice, the 327 would not be bad. you could shoot 32 shorts, 32 longs, 32 H&R, and 327's in it. In the same size gun it has one more round then the 38/357 usually.

While nothing you've said is incorrect I would still argue in favor of the 38 over the 327.

All of the .32 rounds you mentioned are almost dead or dying. While I love odd ball rounds I don't think this is the case here. We are talking about a person who wants to defend themselves and be able to enjoy shooting. The 327 offers nothing over a 38 in this area.


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