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-   -   Polishing the feed ramp (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f15/polishing-feed-ramp-24485/)

Don Davis 03-10-2010 09:41 PM

Polishing the feed ramp
 
I have several automatic handguns and I want to polish their feed ramps.

I know how to break each gun down, so that's not the advise I need.

Can anyone tell me what to use and the steps that they take to do a good job of feed ramp polishing?

i.e. do you use a dremel tool or do it by hand - what grain wet / dry sand paper do you use (or do you use wet / dry sand paper at all)

Thanks in advance for your help.

:)

NGIB 03-10-2010 09:54 PM

Unless you are an experienced gunsmith - never bring a Dremel into the same room as your guns. Are you having problems with your guns?

tekarra 03-10-2010 10:21 PM

I have polished several ramps by hand using crocus cloth. Work it a bit, then stop and have a look. I concur that a Dremel tool should be kept in its case when doing the polishing.

greenjeans 03-11-2010 01:32 AM

No sandpaper, period. I do use a Dremel tool on mine. I use a felt buffing wheel with jewelers rouge and it is next to impossible to remove metal with that combination. Just polish to a high shine.

lonyaeger 03-11-2010 01:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NGIB (Post 245255)
Unless you are an experienced gunsmith - never bring a Dremel into the same room as your guns. Are you having problems with your guns?

Don....IMO you need to listen to what Dave is telling you here!

MoHawk 03-11-2010 01:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lonyaeger (Post 245405)
Don....IMO you need to listen to what Dave is telling you here!



Also known as.... If it ain't broke, don't fix it.

BILLYBOB44 03-11-2010 01:58 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by greenjeans (Post 245399)
No sandpaper, period. I do use a Dremel tool on mine. I use a felt buffing wheel with jewelers rouge and it is next to impossible to remove metal with that combination. Just polish to a high shine.

+1 This has worked for me on several semi-autos. :D

gorknoids 03-11-2010 02:51 AM

Contractors, artists, and anyone who does a lot of drawing (I'm a landscaper)are familiar with electric erasers. It's basically a Dremel tool that takes an insert composed of.....eraser. You can find them at most art stores. They work exceptionally well for polishing out machine marks, built-up residue, and what-have-you. For serious defects, jeweler's supply stores have somewhat more abrasive tools which fit the Dremel, but anything with has a small chuck will hold them.
http://www.artsuppliesonline.com/bigimg/12184.jpg

Gatekeeper 03-11-2010 03:51 AM

1 Attachment(s)
This works a lot faster:p
Attachment 11412

I've used a little flitz metal polish on a q-tip for some light polishing of internal parts. I don't trust myself to do much heavier removal. Thats what my 'smith is for.
As impatient as I am, I'd end up using the above tool:rolleyes:

Don Davis 03-11-2010 08:09 PM

lonyaeger

Which one is "Dave" ?


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