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-   -   Looking for suggestions on buying my first semiauto handgun (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f15/looking-suggestions-buying-my-first-semiauto-handgun-43179/)

Thejiro 05-29-2011 06:29 PM

Looking for suggestions on buying my first semiauto handgun
 
I have never owned or really shot guns. I am looking for a good reliable semiauto handgun that I can learn the fundamentals of marksmanship on. I am considering a 22caliber because they are relatively inexpensive as guns go and the ammo is cheap. I was hoping to get some suggestions on what to look into and to help me with my descision.

Tia
Ken

Recon 173 05-30-2011 02:29 PM

There is nothing wrong with starting off with a .22 caliber pistol at all. Ruger makes some good pistols that shoot the .22 LR cartridge and will help you develop your shooting skills. Smith and Wesson also makes some good .22 LR pistols. Either one would work well for you. Go talk to a gun dealer and see what they suggest or check out a local range when they have shooters present to see what they suggest.

Tonopah 06-03-2011 03:52 PM

Ruger
 
Ruger 22 pistols are awesome....

Jay 06-03-2011 04:20 PM

This is strictly my opinion, and has worked in many years of firearms training, and for men and ladies alike. Buy a handgun just like you would buy a pair of shoes. If Ol' Joe over here says he likes Charlie China tennis shoes, and you're looking for a new pair of shoes, do you run out and buy Joe's pick, just because HE likes 'em? Probably not. If a new shooter is asking what to buy for a carry gun, it doesn't matter what works for me, or anyone else. I suggest telling that new shooter to go to many gun shops, and/or gun shows, and handle all the guns they can get hold of. Just like they would try on shoes. Before long they'll be able to make a list of guns that feel ok, pretty good, real good, and "that really feels great in my hands". The last two are the ones to pursue, and here's why I say that....
If a given handgun doesn't feel "right" in your hands, you'll not shoot it enough to become proficient with it, because it's not comfortable, and you won't like shooting it. Just like you rarely wear shoes that are UNcomfortable. If you're not gonna become proficient with it, save your money, and buy a ball bat to carry. With proper fundamentals, he/she can learn to shoot almost any handgun, or any caliber. Very few folks can re-train their hands to make just any handgun feel comfortable. The last suggestion.........proper shooting techinques, practiced slowly, but proficiently, will breed speed. Do it slowly, and do it the right way, every time.......If you practice speed first, and introduce less efficient techniques into your training, you'll have to do it all over again to get it right.

By the way..... anyone who introduces a new shooter to our pastime by having them start with a large-caliber handgun, makes a very poor decision. Yes, some folks do ok starting out with large calibers, but the vast majority will not continue to shoot if their very 1st experience is with .50 S&W. Start with a .22 caliber something, and as your technique/accuracy improves, work up from there.

Again, just my ramblings.... but they work for me...

Shoot Safely....

mcfroggin 06-04-2011 01:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bullethole (Post 517028)
Id suggest you get a .50 caliber Desert Eagle . They give the best bang for your buck. You got alot of bragging rights when you own one!

As your first gun, no sir.

Gojubrian 06-04-2011 02:20 PM

I would look at the Browning Buckmark (my personal favorite) or the Ruger Mark 2 or 3 pistol.

If you want a Revolver, get a single six made by riger or a smith&wesson 617. :cool:

Olympus 06-05-2011 09:16 PM

Nothing wrong with a .22 as your first like others have said. It's a good caliber to start learning the fundamental with. I own several .22 pistols and frequently take them out to the range for some fundamental training and get myself out of a bad habit. They're cheap to shoot and you can have a lot of fun. Depending on where you live, me and my buddies used to always go out on Sunday afternoons in the country and we'd all bring .22s to shoot. We'd take turns playing HORSE while shooting at dirt clods, sticks, or whatever else. We had a lot of fun and it was cheap.

Ruger Mark II Target is one of my favorite all around guns to shoot. After I got into the target .22s a little more, I started collecting old High Standards. The old ones are considered by many to be the best target .22 made. The new ones aren't the same though. A lot of people like the Browning Buckmark, Beretta Neos, Walther P22, and Sig Sauer Mosquito as well. Just some other options.

I used to always drag this little guy out on our friendly .22 shooting competitions until my friends saw that it was a little bit of an unfair advantage! Hahaha!

http://i202.photobucket.com/albums/a...9/PC311598.jpg

Kain 06-05-2011 09:58 PM

As a farily person fairly new to firearms myself (<2 years) I can say my strong advise is for either a 22lr or 9mm. Both are cheap to shoot and relatively easy to find (Wally-World almost always has both in large quantities) My first gun was a Phoenix Arms HP22. Followed by a Ruger P95. I gave the Phoenix away to a friend of mine and I sold the P95 to a buddy of mine. Both were fine, reliable firearms with almost no issues. I think I shot more ammunition through both of them than the guns themselves were worth. But I didn't feel bad about abusing them because they were "cheap" guns. The Phoenix is now a "purse gun" that will likely never be fired again and the P-95 has had maybe 5k rounds put through it by someone else using it as a "break-in" gun.

I guess what I'm saying is, don't spend a lot of money on your first gun, spend it on ammunition. Also, popular guns are usually popular for a reason. They tend to fit the needs of the greatest number of people. But it dosen't guarantee it'll be right for YOU.

Dennis845 06-05-2011 11:44 PM

Two Birds with One Stone
 
Just something to ponder, I know you said inexpensive and this isn't, but... If you purchased say, a 1911 style .45 caliber pistol with a .22 cal. conversion kit, you have it all. A cheap shooting .22 cal. handgun you can train with, a CCW gun and a home defense weapon all wrapped in one. If you just want a .22 to pling cans with, the advise from these guys is excellent. Just my nickel's worth. Good shooting.

Olympus 06-06-2011 02:05 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dennis845 (Post 518296)
Just something to ponder, I know you said inexpensive and this isn't, but... If you purchased say, a 1911 style .45 caliber pistol with a .22 cal. conversion kit, you have it all. A cheap shooting .22 cal. handgun you can train with, a CCW gun and a home defense weapon all wrapped in one. If you just want a .22 to pling cans with, the advise from these guys is excellent. Just my nickel's worth. Good shooting.

While good advice, I don't know that I would recommend the .22 conversion kits for a brand new gun owner like the OP. My experience with the conversion kits are that they can be a little finnicky and might scare a new gun owner away, especially if the owner has a very limited knowledge of guns in general or tinkering with them. Granted a I haven't messed with the kits in several years, the new ones might be better than the older ones.


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