Firearm & Gun Forum - FireArmsTalk.com > Handguns > Semi-Auto Handguns > Help with a new S&W PPK/S

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Old 11-29-2012, 10:20 PM   #11
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[QUOTE=danf_fl;988510
Also make sure you are using quality ammo. If you have some inexpensive Wally World, steel cased that is painted, expect problems.

Get the brass casing.[/QUOTE]

I must respectfully disagree. A quality weapon should function perfectly with steel case ammo. The Germans used tons of it in their Walthers during the war.

I've used thousands of rounds of Wolf, and steel case MilSiurp in a dozen or more high quality handguns without any problems.

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Old 11-30-2012, 08:26 AM   #12
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Sounds to me like you were running your gun dry. Semi-automatic pistols need to be lubricated to function properly.

I suggest you read the owner's manual and keep the rails oiled. Different guns require different amounts of oil to work properly. You want enough oil to reduce friction, but not so much as to attract dirt, lint, and powder residue.

J

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Old 11-30-2012, 10:12 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locutus View Post
I must respectfully disagree. A quality weapon should function perfectly with steel case ammo. The Germans used tons of it in their Walthers during the war.

I've used thousands of rounds of Wolf, and steel case MilSiurp in a dozen or more high quality handguns without any problems.
I've seen the results of the Monarch steel cases used in a new Walther were creating problems for the new owner. The gun was purchased new and continued rapid fire was getting the Walther warm, creating FTEs. I provided some brass casings and the gun worked fine.

Most new guns and owner's require a "breaking in". The gun to smooth out parts working together. The owner to get to know how the gun functions and to build trust in the gun.

During the "break-in" I suggest quality ammo. Then there is normally no question if it was the firearm, the owner, or the ammo causing jams.
After the "break-in" period, then use whatever ammo you want.
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Old 11-30-2012, 04:40 PM   #14
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[QUOTE=danf_fl;1033132

Most new guns and owner's require a "breaking in". The gun to smooth out parts working together. The owner to get to know how the gun functions and to build trust in the gun.

During the "break-in" I suggest quality ammo. Then there is normally no question if it was the firearm, the owner, or the ammo causing jams.
After the "break-in" period, then use whatever ammo you want.[/QUOTE]


I don't disagree with that at all. I misunderstood your post, I guess. I thought you were advising against all steel case ammo in all cases. My bad!

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Old 11-30-2012, 05:59 PM   #15
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I once had a Bersa model 85 that had the same problem try polishing the feedramp.

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