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-   -   FPS important or not (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f15/fps-important-not-68284/)

JMAtactical 07-16-2012 12:19 AM

FPS important or not
 
So is the feet per second a deal breaker or not. Take a 9mm moving at about 1160 fps and compare it to a 45 moving at around 870... Is the difference enough to be concerned about. I mean either way you cant dodge a bullet... Well unless your neo from the matrix i guess

danf_fl 07-16-2012 12:41 AM

The biggest thing is being able to hit with either.

If you miss, it doesn't matter how fast the bullet was.

FPS is tied directly to physics. The greater the mass, the more it takes to get to a specific speed.

Penetration, wound channel, overpenetration are concerns.

JMAtactical 07-16-2012 12:46 AM

I ask because i am thinking of going from 9mm and 40 to 45.

danf_fl 07-16-2012 12:54 AM

Try to shoot a 4X4 next time at the range.
I have both 9mm and .45. I like the .45 cuz the competitions I used to play in considered the .45 Major factor, and the 9mm Minor factor when scoring.

(I thought they had some reason for that.)

JMAtactical 07-16-2012 12:55 AM

So which round goes through the wood

c3shooter 07-16-2012 02:15 AM

If speed was all that matters, I would be hunting Blue Whales with a .220 Swift. Hey- it's over 4,000 FPS!

The formula is speed squared times mass of the bullet- but also must account for ability of the bullet to penetrate, and a wound channel big enough to let your opponent leak to unconscious quickly. The .45 and .40 do that better than the 9mm Parabellum.

JonM 07-16-2012 02:23 AM

Only two handgun rounds i know of that speed starts to trump weight is the 7.62x25 tokarev and the fn5.7

OldManMontgomery 07-16-2012 02:45 AM

What do you desire?
 
Yes, projectile velocity IS important, but it is only one important factor. c3shooter makes a very valid point; it is not the single factor to consider and probably not the single most important.

Since we are talking about handguns in this section, one presumes you are seeking a handgun for either hunting or self-defense purposes.

The two matters are different, but they are related in terms of what defines 'useful energy'. The 'useful energy' deriving from handgun rounds is a combination of the projectile speed, projectile weight, the shape of the projectile and the nature of the target.

I am one of the old old school types who favor momentum over kinetic energy as a measure of useful energy. I also prefer rather flat nosed bullets.

For the immediate discussion, you should be relieved to know the 'useful energy' levels of both .40 S&W and .45 ACP handgun rounds are at least as viable for self defense as the level of the 9x19 NATO round. There are those of us who consider the 9x19 NATO round the weak sister of the three. However, for self defense or hunting, bullet placement is paramount. A good hit with a somewhat smaller round is better than a sloppy hit or miss with a larger round. (Of course, no one seriously suggests hunting elephant with a .22 long rifle simply because one can 'hit with it'.) I prefer a good hit with a larger round, myself.

If you are seeking a long range target pistol, velocity usually equates to less bullet drop at a given range. But when a bullet 'drops' at extended range, it always does so at a uniform rate.

locutus 07-16-2012 10:30 PM

In the real world, if there is any real difference in fight stopping ability between the 9MM, .357 SIG, .40and .45 it is too small to measure.

It's interesting to discuss whether a .40 will stop a fight quickly 87 percent of the time, and a .45 only 85 percent, but does that 2 percent really matter on the street?:p

An assailant hit with a .22LR is damaged more than an assailant missed with a .44 magnum.

Marksmanship trumps caliber every time.

JMAtactical 07-16-2012 10:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by c3shooter
If speed was all that matters, I would be hunting Blue Whales with a .220 Swift. Hey- it's over 4,000 FPS!

The formula is speed squared times mass of the bullet- but also must account for ability of the bullet to penetrate, and a wound channel big enough to let your opponent leak to unconscious quickly. The .45 and .40 do that better than the 9mm Parabellum.

Very informative


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