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Old 03-18-2013, 09:44 PM   #21
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Hey guys just a quick comment on your dry fire . I know for the glock they do make a trigger reset assembly. simply drops right in where the old trigger is. only for practice only. goto Glock store.com. he has a video on 1. combines with the laser and a laser target. sweet setup. also sells 1 for an AR.

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Old 03-18-2013, 11:54 PM   #22
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Quote:
Originally Posted by The_Kid View Post

Boxers confirm it every day. What they do on the heavy bag is what they do in the ring.

Video Link: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hKEYipyU21w
This video displays how you can ingrain habits that carry over into the fight... whereas bad habits will get you killed.
Not even close to same thing.
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Old 03-19-2013, 12:08 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vincent View Post

What's laughable is this whole post. Muscle memory is a key component to shooting proficiency and does not matter IN THE LEAST how is was developed.

By your logic, it's useless to practice playing a musical instrument unless you are on stage, in front of a crowd, nervous and jittery. What baloney...

OP-Don't let this poster influence your thinking with his obvious lack of experience with firearms. Dry fire practice is CRUCIAL in developing and maintaining a good fundamental skill set. Competetive shooters dry fire tens of thousands of times to keep good form as shooting is a perishable skill.

Practicing dry fire, drawing from retention, sight acquisition, trigger control and follow through routinely will help you hone your skills and keep you well rehearsed should the time come when you need your firearm, whether it be at the range, competition or (God forbid) a self defense situation.

Example-Ever driven a manual transmission for a long period of time, then get behind the wheel of an automatic? Notice how your foot goes for the (non-existent) clutch without even thinking about it? That's muscle memory. If you could draw, obtain a sight picture and fire the same way your foot went for the clutch...without having to think about it...how invaluable would that skill be to you should the need ever arise?

Lasers are great for that, you can actually SEE what you're doing wrong and can adjust accordingly.

Snap caps are great, if your firearm needs them. There's not a lightswitch, doorknob, lamp or picture frame in my house that hasn't been dry fired on thousands of times.

And of course...safety first!!
Musical instruments are to play all kinds of songs with different arrangements and rhythms, a gun plays only one. You practice pulling a trigger and aiming and that's enough... for me. I stick firmly to my original statement.
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Old 03-19-2013, 12:13 AM   #24
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I dry fire my pistols a few times a week, just to keep familiarized with them. Especially my newer one that I haven't shot as much. That way when I go to the range I keep up all my good habits.

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Old 03-19-2013, 01:43 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jgoertz View Post

At the risk of getting a time out, I am calling this guy a jerk. This and a couple of other posts on the forum recently make me think he is a kid troll with little or no knowledge of firearms.
You aren't alone. And I don't think you'll get timed out for it, shouldn't. I'd call someone I thought a jerk much worse, so you're doing fine. I won't ever say my opinions or thoughts are popular ones, but I'm airways honest with them and don't hold back. I live by my favorite quote...

"All can be forgiven of he whom has complete candor."

Never agreed with anything more in my life. However it is a very unpopular philosophy. So you're reaction is very understandable.
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Old 03-19-2013, 02:32 AM   #26
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I appreciated the thoughtful responses (obviously one poster added no value whatsoever). I am trying to pull together a set of exercises that I can use to keep dry firing fresh - several good ideas presented here already. To be more specific, do you follow a specific routine in dry fire each time or do you just pick one area to work on each session? How long do you make each session? Any other great tips?

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Old 03-19-2013, 11:34 AM   #27
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This could get a bit esoteric......oh well?

There's a longstanding notion that a lot subscribe to.It's that you do one "thing" until it's imprinted in your computer(brain).Nothing new there....but what's not addressed is how different folks process this exercise.

Here's an example;I've shot "fingers" with traditional archery gear for almost 50 years.The finger muscles on my right hand are like claws of steel.....no biggy.But those are different muscles and management than what it takes to pull a Dbl action revolver trigger.BUT,because they're SO conditioned from years of doing "X"......then it's a shorter rd.if you will.....to reaching higher levels of skill with a new(gun) activity.

Just using that as an example....have shot handguns almost as long as bows.The point being understanding how muscle memory fits in with your body and past experiences.Here's another example.

Lets say you wanted to get into handgun competition.Here we have two guys....both with about equal training/skill/accuracy with firearms.Both are going after the tourney trail with shooting.One has a lot of experience in single person sports,pick one...Golf,tennis,bowling.The other guy has only played team sports.Which one would you bet on when it came time to handling "match pressure"?

So look at your strengths and weaknesses.Are you the dense type(lame attempt at humor)?Then maybe practice the running around part?...or....You may have a bum leg....but you're a retired welder and can hold a pistol DEAD still for 2 minutes and peal the top off a soup can at 50 meters.So,skip the runnin and figure on accuracy.

Then decide how to maximize your learning curve,in how it "sticks".You may not need to run around the house 20 times to get your heart rate up.You may only need a cpl reps to have a skill embedded...you get the idea.This is what coaching does.The coach works to try and understand where you "need" work and what your strengths are.

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Old 03-23-2013, 07:00 PM   #28
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IMHO, 15 minutes per evening with a particular weapon is a good dry fire period.

But one must constantly guard against falling into the trap of "playing" with the weapon, instead of full concentration practice.

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Old 03-23-2013, 10:49 PM   #29
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Quote:
Originally Posted by locutus
IMHO, 15 minutes per evening with a particular weapon is a good dry fire period.

But one must constantly guard against falling into the trap of "playing" with the weapon, instead of full concentration practice.
I tend to agree. Shorter more frequent sessions are more productive than marathon sessions once a month.
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Old 03-23-2013, 11:11 PM   #30
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Never saw any use in dry firing. On the range I would insert a dummy cartridge now and then and watch the student flinch as the trigger was pressed. Much more effective, with almost instantaneous positive results.

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