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-   -   What am I doing wrong? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f14/what-am-i-doing-wrong-77725/)

Squawk 12-05-2012 12:02 AM

I took my new M&P9 VTAC to the range today and had a blast. 350 rounds in 30 minutes. No Failures.

My question is what am I doing to cause my shots to go low left? Around 7:30 of my POA.

I am the only gun owner in my family and I have never had proper instruction.

Thanks for any advice.

(This is assuming my gun is fine. I was always told its not the arrow. It's the Indian.)

magnumman 12-05-2012 12:06 AM

If it is your first time with a safe action trigger? I would blame it on that. focus on a smooth, straight back pull. It took me some time to get used to my m&p trigger but now my shots are dead on. If that is not it. Maybe try a smaller palm swell, you might be torquing a bit.


Edit: my shots started low left as well.

Squawk 12-05-2012 12:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by magnumman
If it is your first time with a safe action trigger? I would blame it on that. focus on a smooth, straight back pull. It took me some time to get used to my m&p trigger but now my shots are dead on. If that is not it. Maybe try a smaller palm swell, you might be torquing a bit.

Edit: my shots started low left as well.

I don't think so. I have shot a Glock and a few XD/XDm. This seems to be the same with all of them. I know it is me but I'm a newbie in the gun world.

I have the small grip installed so I don't think it is that. I was told by one person to dry fire practice a lot at home to develop better habits.

I had someone else tell me not to dry fire. Said it was bad for the gun but wouldn't elaborate. Someone set me straight.

GaryGlock 12-05-2012 12:20 AM

As someone said try dry firing and practicing. You can buy snap caps for around 10$ which is what I practice with. Also while your shooting randomly put a few in the magazine and you can see if your jerking when your shooting.

Watch your grip with your pinky as well. If your anticipating the shot and squeezing harder with your bottom finger you will jerk the pistol down causing your 7:30 shots. When I shoot my pistol I'm basically holding on with my middle and ring finger, and my pinky is kinda just there. Hope this helps.

Squawk 12-05-2012 12:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GaryGlock
As someone said try dry firing and practicing. You can buy snap caps for around 10$ which is what I practice with.

Watch your grip with your pinky as well. If your anticipating the shot and squeezing harder with your bottom finger you will jerk the pistol down causing your 7:30 shots. When I shoot my pistol I'm basically holding on with my middle and ring finger, and my pinky is kinda just there. Hope this helps.

Anything helps. Thanks.

canebrake 12-05-2012 12:23 AM

Do what I do with each "New-to-shooting" student;
  1. I tell them to ignore ALL the other shooters around them.
  2. I start them off with a target set at a ridiculously close range.
  3. Once they start to get rounds on paper they start to under stand how to walk them in on the 10 ring.
  4. They also begin to understand the difference between POA and POI and how to adjust to make them the same.
  5. Success breeds success, each student will grow bored with all bull's-eyes and request to move the target out to a more challenging distance. This needs to be done in baby steps.
  6. With each target move, the process starts over. Take your time, enjoy the moment. (This is sage advice for both student and instructor.)
Enjoy the exercise and understand that ALL new shooters need to have a positive experience if we wish them to turn into experienced shooters.

In our sport, if a participant doesn't have fun, they go bowling.

magnumman 12-05-2012 12:24 AM

1 Attachment(s)
The only guns you don't want to dry fire are rim fires because you can break the firing pin. If it makes you nervous and you want to play it safe, pick up some snap caps. Dry fire practice will help you see if the sights move when you pull the trigger. Try putting up a target in your basement or garage or whatever, and try to dry fire and keep the sights in the bull. You should be able to tell if you are doing something wrong and fix it from there.

Attachment 73028

And maybe try shooting at one of these

RobertsDefense 12-05-2012 12:26 AM

You are defiantly anticipating the shot/recoil. No big deal, common issue. Get some snap caps as suggested above, put an empty case on the end of the slide and try to ballance it while practicing with the caps. It is a pretty easy habbit to break with some practice. Good luck!

Squawk 12-05-2012 01:48 AM

Thanks all. Greatly appreciate the help.

danf_fl 12-05-2012 09:52 AM

Every pull on the trigger involves other steps, too.

The basics are:
Sight alignment,
Breath control,
Squeeze the trigger,
Follow through

Most people get the first three, but fail on follow through.
Follow through can be described as "Do not release the trigger until the firearm has settled down after the shot."
Watch how many people "snap" their trigger finger off the trigger after the shot breaks. That "snap" will also affect POI.


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