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-   -   Tricks up your sleeve? (http://www.firearmstalk.com/forums/f14/tricks-up-your-sleeve-39543/)

yvette 03-09-2011 06:51 PM

Tricks up your sleeve?
 
Hi,

I'm pretty new to shooting. Been going to local range for around a year now. Gotten a bit better, but somedays it's like my first time. I really crack under pressure... severe stage freight I guess. I hate it when people watch me shoot. Anyway, I really need tips, hints to calm down and take my time. Maybe some sort of mental trick. Nothing has worked so far....just reminding me to calm down definitely does not work!

Oh.....I like bigger guns...I feel I can steady myself better with them. I'm a pretty small frame girl...120? Anyway started out with a 22 and I was all over the place. The bigger the gun the more I could calm my hands down and not jerk the trigger so much. I have a 357 6" barrel now that I LOVE! But I still have a lot of trouble. The first time I shot a rifle, it really calmed me down....sitting and waiting. I loved it! Shot an AR15 well at 200yards...best shooting I've done.

Anyway, any help would be amazing!

JonM 03-09-2011 07:05 PM

get your 22 out but dont hang a target. just shoot. focus on pacing your firing by counting to 3 between shots. this takes the worry about grouping and sights and what not out of the picture and lets you focus on only one thing which is being calm while using the firearm. another thing is to load only 1 round shoot it then load another.

thats what i find works well when teaching new shooters that are having trouble with control.

IGETEVEN 03-09-2011 07:36 PM

What he said. ^^^

So let me get this straight...you saying size does matter with you? ;)

Welcome to the FTF Yvett. :D When ya get a chance could you stop by INTRODUCTIONS and say howdy to everyone, but it's your call.

I would recommend some one on one firearms training time with a certified instructor there at your range, if have someone available there. Breathing control, along with trigger control can easily be picked up with some dedicated practice, plus it will help some with the "stage fright."

There are dry-fire exercises that can done as well, to help with your control and aim.

group17 03-09-2011 08:06 PM

I would go to the range early or late so you have the range to yourself. Less worry about who's watching over your shoulder. Would calm your mind your not being judged on your marksmanship so you could can concentrate on the important stuff.

opaww 03-09-2011 08:27 PM

I tend to shake a lot when I shoot, and when I am shooting my Howa it is magnified in the scope. To help I close my eyes and take a few breaths slowly, and think of something not stressful like smelling a rose. Then I open my eyes get my sight picture inhale and exhale half way hold by breathing and squeeze the trigger.

I go to the range very early in the morning so I avoid the crowds of people that make me nervous

danf_fl 03-09-2011 08:42 PM

Concentrate on the four parts:
sight alignment
breath control
trigger
follow through.

Follow through is releasing the trigger at the same rate you squeezed it. Releasing the trigger too fast will upset your shot.

Neophyte1 03-09-2011 08:55 PM

Welcome
 
yvette: Ma'am, Welcome from ''Mecklenburg'' NC :)

dunerunner 03-09-2011 09:02 PM

Welcome Yvette! Everyone was a novice at one time, unless they were born with a gun in hand like some of our members. :D Don't worry about the others at the range. Learn good safety practices and practice, practice, practice. A few hours every other week with a good instructor mixed into your range time is invaluable.

CA357 03-09-2011 10:04 PM

Welcome to the FTF community Yvette.

Winds of Change should be by in a while and she shoots a .357 Magnum. In fact, she just posted a range report.

winds-of-change 03-09-2011 10:54 PM

Here I am!! :D

Yvette, I think most people at the range aren't really 'watching you'. I believe most are concentrating on their own shooting. I, too, am shooting a .357 6" barrel Ruger GP100. Before I ever went to the range I bought snap caps and practiced at home just squeezing the trigger, looking through the sights. It also might help you to go shooting with someone with lots of experience and listen intently to what they have to tell you. Somethings you can't learn on your own, you have to be shown.

I just shot a Ruger Mark II yesterday and I really liked it. I liked it because it was light and easy to shoot. What I would maybe suggest is to practice on one gun for now until you feel confident with it.

The words of wisdom that always helped me was 'everyone was new to guns at some time'. Believe me, no one is judging you at the range. Just go, concentrate on your gun, the sights and the target and you'll forget about the others there.

I am pretty new to guns and have loads and loads to learn but I like to shoot and have fun doing it. If I can help you in any way, please let me know. I probably can't teach you much but I'd love to learn right along with you.


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