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Old 07-05-2008, 06:31 PM   #11
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then you put them in a separate tub filled with oil and run them for another 10 minutes on ultra-sonic. Wipe the parts down & reassemble. Good for storage, carry or immediate use.
This is the important part of the process.

How does it do on metal deposits in the barrels?


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Old 07-05-2008, 07:07 PM   #12
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How does it do on metal deposits in the barrels?
When I first got the machine, I was already pretty well versed in it's use, but I was also concerned about the rifling of the barrel being cleaned.

I took my USP to the range and ran 200 rounds of the dirtiest range ammo available through it. I came home and stripped the weapon, put it in the tank and ran it for 8 minutes.

I pulled the barrel out and ran a patch through the barrel and it came out with only the most minimum of traces of fouling on it. I rinsed all the parts with hot water, as instructed, then ran them through the oil bath. When I pulled the barrel from the oil bath, I put the bore scope on it and it looked perfectly clean.

The lands and grooves were all crisp and clean, with a thin coating of oil, the chamber and feed ramp were basically spotless. I now run all my parts through on a 12 minute clean and an 8 to 10 minute oil bath. I reassemble with a clean, white rag and surgical gloves before returning the weapons to their respective case.

In almost 2 years I haven't had any issues and the all the weapons are still in pristine condition.

All in all, I really like the unit and would like to get a larger, carbine sized one for the reloading bench, if I ever get around to getting it all set up - but I still have a yard to get growing, a kitchen floor to replace and about a dozen other things on the home improvement list before I get to set up the weapons/reloading room.

JD


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Old 07-05-2008, 11:45 PM   #13
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All in all, I really like the unit and would like to get a larger, carbine sized one for the reloading bench, if I ever get around to getting it all set up - but I still have a yard to get growing, a kitchen floor to replace and about a dozen other things on the home improvement list before I get to set up the weapons/reloading room.
JD
UH JD may I suggest from 25 years of domestic bliss you learn early to work on YOUR projects a little bit at a time inbetween her projects .

If you don't you'll never get around to yours because she will always find more to be done and add to the list . O and God help you if/when kids come along .
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Old 07-06-2008, 01:55 AM   #14
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For years I have been cleaning my black powder guns in soapy water. To dry them simply rinse in boiling water. The hot water evaporates leaving a very DRY gun which then needs to be lubed. I wouldn't do this with an assembly because of the possibility of trapping moisture in small tight places, but for removeable cylinders and barrels it works fine.

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Old 07-06-2008, 04:39 AM   #15
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UH JD may I suggest from 25 years of domestic bliss you learn early to work on YOUR projects a little bit at a time inbetween her projects .

If you don't you'll never get around to yours because she will always find more to be done and add to the list . O and God help you if/when kids come along .
Great advice BigO. Sounds like you have the recipe down pat. I hope to get to the point where I can say "after 25 years".

JD
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Old 07-06-2008, 07:14 PM   #16
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Really, the best things to use on guns is nitro solvent and a good gun oil. Soap will strip the oils out of the steel and won't do anything to loosen the lead and/or copper deposits from the chamber and barrel.
That is the best thing but thats also where Ballistol comes in handy. When water and regular cleaning won't get rid of the junk in the barrel Ballistol will.

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I've also read that soap and water was used to clean guns. I don't know if it's true or just legend, but I've read - on the internet of course - that some soldiers would urinate down the barrel of their rifle if they shot corrosive ammo. Apparently the urine would counteract the effects of the powder. Probably like windex is used. Of course, you have to pay to get windex.
It probably would work. Pee and windex are both ammonia based. If the ammonia in windex breaks down the junk in the barrel then the ammonia in pee would also probably break down the fouling in the barrel.
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Old 07-16-2008, 12:48 PM   #17
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Really, the best things to use on guns is nitro solvent and a good gun oil. Soap will strip the oils out of the steel and won't do anything to loosen the lead and/or copper deposits from the chamber and barrel.
This is true for smokeless powder cased-ammo. Black powder arms are best cleaned with soapy water because of it's ability to strip the oils. An oily barrel attracts powder residue which accumulates rapidly making loading difficult. This residue is also hygoscopic and will eventually form rust. Their are products on the market which "condition" the bore of a black powder firearm with continued use, effectively reducing the build up of crud and allowing more shots between cleanings. The soap and water will not fully remove this coating as it does with petroleum-based oils.
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Old 07-31-2008, 04:03 AM   #18
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If you can get the components dry very quickly, there shouldn't be any problem removing gunpowder residue with soap and water. I wouldn't do it considering the options, (Dry cleaning solvent is the ticket) but if you can do it without causing corrosion, have at it.

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Old 08-23-2008, 11:32 PM   #19
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Default Octagon soap

I am a brown boot US Army (1950+) guy and in those days we stored our M1 Garand rifles in a weapons rack on the barracks floor only "guarded" by a unarmed soldier.

But in those days I would carry my .22 rifle to school and put it in my wall locker if I was going hunting after school. What a change in the last 60 years :>)

Back to the gun cleaning. After shooting on the range we "cleaned" our M1's in a bucket of hot water and Octagon soap followed by a good oiling. Used that method for years with no apparent problems.

I also used the M1 Garand in 1965 Viet-Nam because that damn .556 did not go thru jungle growth worth a dam. My M1 NEVER failed to operate even when it spent a lot of time under the water during the rainy season and that's why my SHTF rifle is my M1 :>)

Jim

"My M1 does my talking for me"



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